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By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Erin Texeira and Marilyn McCraven contributed to this article | June 7, 1997
Baltimore recreation and parks chief Marlyn J. Perritt abruptly resigned yesterday, one day after the mayor questioned her leadership and ordered a review of the top management of her agency.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he heard about Perritt's resignation secondhand through his deputy chief of staff. He said that he likely will discuss the details of her departure next week."I think she has had to deal with some very difficult situations, particularly the extremely tight budget she's had to deal with and it has been stressful for her," Schmoke said.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014
I would like to talk about Maryland's Program Open Space and The Sun's editorial ("Open space falls short," March 9) and Dan Rodricks ' column on the subject ("Marylanders need to speak up for open space ," April 1). Both represent outsiders looking in while I would like to give you my view as an insider looking out. From 1982 until 1992, I was president of the Bel Air Parks and Recreation Committee. In the latter years, the 18 parks and recreation councils formed a Presidents Committee.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 5, 1991
Money for community use of school facilities on nights and weekends will run out by the end of this month, a county auditor announced yesterday.The county can either grant an extra $300.000 to the Department of Parks and recreation, which schedules programs for community groups wishing to use the schools, or terminate the programs during April, May and June, said assistant county auditor Bruce Emge. Emge was speaking as a member of a County Council task force on school spending reforms which met yesterday.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Councilman Carl Stokes called Friday for the city's comptroller to audit the Department of Recreation and Parks and to report the findings to the City Council in 90 days to 120 days. Stokes was joined at the Ambrose Kennedy Pool and Playground, one of the city's pools set to close this summer, by Councilman James B. Kraft and Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke. Stokes said he is convinced that there is "hidden money" in the parks department that could allow some recreation centers and pools set to close remain open.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
As the number of Baltimore's recreation centers continues to plummet because of budget cuts, city leaders are grappling with just how many of the programs and activities can still be offered to the more than 180,000 youngsters in the city.Increasingly, the answer seems to lie with the popular Police Athletic Leagues formed 18 months ago. But for many recreation counselors, the idea of police officers coming in to do their jobs doesn't sit well.Many are resentful, worried and suspicious and say their hard work is not appreciated.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
The cost of swimming in Baltimore pools this summer, renting city facilities and playing in city basketball leagues will increase to help cover $2.9 million in budget cuts to the city recreation department.The increases is expected to bring an additional $60,000 to city coffers and are considered the first of many budget actions to affect residents as the city wrestles with a $153 million deficit over the next four years.Among the increases approved by the city Board of Estimates yesterday are:An increase from 75 cents to $1 for admission to neighborhood pools and a rise of $1 to $1.50 for park pools.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
THE BUSINESS of providing recreation programs to all ages is a business that needs to be conducted by trained recreation professionals.The May 10 editorial, ''Police fill rec center void,'' was very disturbing to the thousands of trained recreational professionals working in Maryland to provide a variety of recreation programs from the arts to midnight basketball leagues.We are certainly in agreement with the editorial that provision of such programs can and does fight crime. However, I cannot understand the statement, ''This is important police work.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
A capacity crowd of Baltimore residents filled the balcony of City Council chambers yesterday to protest a proposed $2.9 million cut for the parks and recreation department.Over three years, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has cut $15 million from the department's budget, resulting in the closing of 18 recreation centers. At the same time, the city has started 27 Police Athletic League centers.Douglas B. Brady Jr., who retired three years ago after working 34 years for parks and recreation, complained that the PAL centers serve only those age 7 to 15. The proposed recreation cuts will affect senior citizens and tiny tots, Brady said.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
Inside the Clarence Du Burns Arena, one of the Baltimore area's premier soccer facilities, 9-year-old Matthew Wilson's eyes lock on the ball in front of him. His arms and legs twitch in anticipation of scoring.Young Matthew tunes out the faint din of cheering parents, and with lightning-fast speed catapults the ball toward the goal. He scores. Lights flash and bells ring.Matthew looks over at his buddy as the soccer pinball machine quiets down and says, "You got another quarter? I want to play again."
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
Responding to a critical report on Baltimore's ailing Department of Recreation and Parks, agency head Marlyn J. Perritt said yesterday that she will begin an immediate internal review that could result in changes in top management and citywide recreation programs.Perritt pledged yesterday that her department would become more financially independent and would market itself better. She said she has scheduled meetings with her advisory board and senior staff to discuss the department's problems.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | June 15, 2009
Northeast Baltimore teenager Sanchel Brown developed a passion for all forms of dance, from African to tap, at a local recreation center that set her upon her current path to college. But she worries that kids in her neighborhood may be denied the same opportunity because of budget cuts at City Hall. "They complain about the children always making trouble, but we don't have anything to do that's affordable," said Brown, a rising senior at Baltimore City College who is looking to apply to colleges around the state and major in dance.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun photographer | May 31, 2008
Wanda S. Durden, a former official at a government contracting firm who previously served as an interim director of Washington's parks department, was nominated as the director of Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks yesterday. Durden, 40, would replace Connie A. Brown, who retired from the position in February. Durden most recently worked as the senior director of operations for Motir Services Inc. in Washington. "The Department of Recreation and Parks is a vital, vital tool to help us with some of the systematic issues that impact us," Mayor Sheila Dixon said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
C. Lee Geddes, who during his more than three-decade career as project manager for the Harford County Parks and Recreation Department helped bring to fruition numerous award-winning waterfront projects throughout the county, died of a heart attack Monday at his Aberdeen home. He was 66. Mr. Geddes - who preferred to be known as Bob Lee Geddes - was born in Reading, Pa., and raised in nearby Shillington, Pa., where he graduated from Governor Mifflin High School in 1959. He was also a graduate of the Columbia School for the Arts in Philadelphia, where he studied broadcasting.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2006
Rick Couch has always loved wrestling. He wrestled at Chesapeake High School and then at Salisbury University. After that, he got involved in coaching recreation/junior league wrestling and has been doing that for about 20 years. "I love helping kids out, and I love the sport," said Couch, a Pasadena resident. He is among the many volunteers who coach in the 17-team Anne Arundel County Recreation and Parks wrestling league. The league, which is split into two leagues based on experience and abilities, forms a pipeline for the local high schools.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
Hoping to add to a growing list of dog parks across Maryland, several pet owners are asking Carroll County to set aside space for their four-legged friends to frolic. The county Department of Recreation and Parks is to present to the county commissioners today a proposal to fence off an area where dogs can run unleashed within the 7-acre Westminster Community Pond on Route 140 at Route 97, just outside the city limits. "It's a great opportunity for dogs and their handlers to learn social behavior with other dogs," said Bruce Falkenstine, owner of a 2 1/2 -year-old Labrador named Laser.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 10, 2003
The founder of the original Howard County Trojans youth football club and the county's Department of Recreation and Parks are being sued by a former coach seeking the club's gear and financial proceeds from 1998 through 2002. Julius Warren, a Columbia barbershop owner who lives in Ellicott City, filed the civil suit in Howard County Circuit Court late last month as head of the Howard County Youth Football Association, a corporate entity documents say was registered with the state in April 2002.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | June 15, 2009
Northeast Baltimore teenager Sanchel Brown developed a passion for all forms of dance, from African to tap, at a local recreation center that set her upon her current path to college. But she worries that kids in her neighborhood may be denied the same opportunity because of budget cuts at City Hall. "They complain about the children always making trouble, but we don't have anything to do that's affordable," said Brown, a rising senior at Baltimore City College who is looking to apply to colleges around the state and major in dance.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Just when Towson-area residents were becoming comfortable with a proposed housing development on a 12-acre property in their midst, the possibility of a parklike oasis for the site has been floated temptingly before them.The Baltimore County Planning Board voted Thursday to allow the county's Department of Recreation and Parks to decide if a park is feasible for the vacant parcel on Regester Avenue at Overbrook Road.Board members cited a potential conflict with the Towson Open Space Plan as the reason for their about-face as to what should go on the land -- said to be the last available open-space property in the area.
NEWS
By Margaret Mittelbach and Michael Crewdson and Margaret Mittelbach and Michael Crewdson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2002
NEW YORK - If one were to poll a group of travel professionals, the Bronx is probably the last place on Earth that would come up as an "eco-tourism destination." What they might be surprised to discover is that the Bronx is filled with wild animals - and we don't mean at the Bronx Zoo. Along with typical urban fauna like pigeons, squirrels and sparrows, the Bronx is visited by coyotes, wild turkeys, deer and the occasional bald eagle. In fact, the Bronx is so crowded with furred, feathered and finned species that the New York City Parks and Recreation Department posts a full-time wildlife manager there.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2001
The long-abandoned middle school on Bloomsbury Avenue might just be the most controversial building in Catonsville. Six years ago, a long debate centered over whether the building should be recycled as a middle school. That was followed by an unsuccessful fight by preservationists to save the building's wings. Now, the original 76-year-old structure in the 100 block of Bloomsbury Ave. is being renovated to become Baltimore County's largest community recreation center, Bloomsbury Community Center.
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