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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Several Baltimore City Council members expressed skepticism Monday about a plan to sell some downtown parking garages, while others began lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration to claim funds from the sale for recreation centers in their districts. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said he has concerns about the administration's proposal to raise up to $60 million for recreation centers by selling four of the city's 17 parking garages. Young noted the four garages are money-makers - bringing in $400,000 annually - and questioned whether it's wise to forgo future revenue for a quick cash infusion.
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NEWS
January 27, 2012
No matter how many articles are printed about the problems faced by the youth of Baltimore, they always seem to get pushed to the back burner ("Occupy right to question youth jail plan," Jan. 23). Gov.Martin O'Malley's plans to build a juvenile jail need to be pushed out the window. Instead of using millions of dollars to design jails for youth, take a couple hundred thousand and open recreation centers. Why? Because they work! Growing up in West Baltimore, Liberty Recreation on Maine Avenue was a second home to me. I played on basketball teams, played ping pong, shot pool, and did arts and crafts.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has hired a new director of recreation and parks, choosing an experienced manager who has headed similar agencies in three cities. Ernest W. Burkeen Jr., 64, who previously ran recreation and parks departments in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Detroit, will begin in Baltimore Dec. 17, the mayor is scheduled to announce Tuesday. "Ernest Burkeen is a nationally respected leader in his field with a great track record of success improving parks and recreational opportunities for urban communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
A former Montgomery County recreation official will take the reins at the city's beleaguered Recreation and Parks department, officials announced Tuesday. Gregory A. Bayor, who oversaw special events and cultural programs for Montgomery County for over a decade, was appointed permanent director of the city's recreation and parks department by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake. Bayor, who starts immediately, will be charged with improving programming and crafting a strategic plan for the department, which came under fire for a lack of leadership and transparency by a volunteer transition team appointed by Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
The city would have to scale back efforts to remove trash from rivers under a preliminary budget scenario drafted by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake's administration, the public works director said Monday. The Department of Public Works would no longer maintain costly nets that filter garbage from waterways and would clean storm drains less frequently under the budget plan, Director David E. Scott told Rawlings-Blake, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Comptroller Joan Pratt.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Howard County offices, courts, recreation centers and the animal shelter will be closed on Thanksgiving, and the day after. All county facilities will reopen at regular business hours on Monday, Nov. 28. No trash or recycling pickup services will be offered on Thanksgiving. Normal Thursday service will move to Friday, and for residents whose regular pickup is Friday, service is scheduled for Saturday. The landfill will reopen Friday. Parking meters are free on Thanksgiving, but all parking regulations and fees will be in effect Friday.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
THE BUSINESS of providing recreation programs to all ages is a business that needs to be conducted by trained recreation professionals.The May 10 editorial, ''Police fill rec center void,'' was very disturbing to the thousands of trained recreational professionals working in Maryland to provide a variety of recreation programs from the arts to midnight basketball leagues.We are certainly in agreement with the editorial that provision of such programs can and does fight crime. However, I cannot understand the statement, ''This is important police work.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Kudos to City Council President Jack Young for admitting that there are "so many other important programs and services which lack much needed support in the city" than the Baltimore Grand Prix ("Young urges mayor to end Grand Prix," Jan. 12). The city can start with the recreation centers that supply a safe haven for learning and recreational activities for our vulnerable youth. Youngsters need these outlets and exposure to better things than hanging out on the corners. The centers are supported by their communities, their schools, churches and local families.
NEWS
By Jeff R. Degitz Guest columnist | December 8, 1991
In this time of budget cuts and reductions in services, I would liketo highlight one cost-saving agreement that has been in existence since 1974.I am referring to the Joint-Use Agreement for School-Recreation Centers in Carroll County, signed by the Board of Education and the Department of Recreation and Parks.The goal of this agreement is to make public school buildings andgrounds available after school hours, including evenings and weekends, to be used as neighborhood and community recreation centers.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
The Housing Authority shut down a recreation center for two Annapolis public housing developments Monday after it was found that roof leaks had allowed water to enter the electrical system, creating a potential fire hazard. The city's electrical inspector, Clint Pratt, said he declared the Eastport building "unfit for habitation" and ordered the Housing Authority to replace the roof before reopening the building. The move is the latest problem arising from deteriorating conditions at the authority's 10 properties - which have brought criticism of the authority and its executive director, P. Holden Croslan.
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