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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The developer of a five-acre, mixed-use development at the southwest corner of the intersection of West Cold Spring Lane and Interstate 83 is considering adding a fifth floor of residential units to the project. "A transit-oriented development should have a lot of density," said Judy Siegel, chair of the Linthicum-based Landex Companies, after a presentation to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel on Thursday. It was the second time that early-stage plans for the development, at 2001 W. Cold Spring Lane, were shown to the panel.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1997
It's arts and crafts day at the Fort Worthington Police Athletic League center, and, as usual, the small room is bustling with creative minds trying to turn thoughts into reality.Willie Chance, 15, is trying to win a citywide drawing contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Tavon White, 7, is creating a perfectly wrapped Christmas box to decorate the hallway.Six-year-old Latisha Potts just wants a chance to be creative. At home, she says matter-of-factly, "we don't have crayons."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
At the Crispus Attucks rec center Wednesday, young children were sprawled on mats watching "The Cat in the Hat" while dreamily waving their small feet in the air. Nearby, older children bounced around a basketball court or rehearsed their parts in a presentation for parents. Their performance will mark much more than the end of summer camp. After more than 40 years of operation in West Baltimore's Madison Park neighborhood, Crispus Attucks is slated to close this month - one of at least four centers that will be shuttered under the city's long-planned overhaul of its recreation facilities.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Several Baltimore City Council members expressed skepticism Monday about a plan to sell some downtown parking garages, while others began lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration to claim funds from the sale for recreation centers in their districts. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said he has concerns about the administration's proposal to raise up to $60 million for recreation centers by selling four of the city's 17 parking garages. Young noted the four garages are money-makers - bringing in $400,000 annually - and questioned whether it's wise to forgo future revenue for a quick cash infusion.
NEWS
January 27, 2012
No matter how many articles are printed about the problems faced by the youth of Baltimore, they always seem to get pushed to the back burner ("Occupy right to question youth jail plan," Jan. 23). Gov.Martin O'Malley's plans to build a juvenile jail need to be pushed out the window. Instead of using millions of dollars to design jails for youth, take a couple hundred thousand and open recreation centers. Why? Because they work! Growing up in West Baltimore, Liberty Recreation on Maine Avenue was a second home to me. I played on basketball teams, played ping pong, shot pool, and did arts and crafts.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has hired a new director of recreation and parks, choosing an experienced manager who has headed similar agencies in three cities. Ernest W. Burkeen Jr., 64, who previously ran recreation and parks departments in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Detroit, will begin in Baltimore Dec. 17, the mayor is scheduled to announce Tuesday. "Ernest Burkeen is a nationally respected leader in his field with a great track record of success improving parks and recreational opportunities for urban communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
Despite early City Council concerns about his nomination as director of recreation and parks, Marvin F. Billups Jr. sailed through his confirmation hearing last night, pledging to restore city parks and playgrounds to national prominence. If Mayor Martin O'Malley's nominee is approved by the full council Monday, Billups will inherit a park system that even advocates say is in dire shape. Billups, 58, a division chief in Prince George's County for the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, faces the tasks of restoring several deteriorating recreation centers from dangerous conditions and trying to enhance a once-prominent park system that a national study recently said had declined.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
A former Montgomery County recreation official will take the reins at the city's beleaguered Recreation and Parks department, officials announced Tuesday. Gregory A. Bayor, who oversaw special events and cultural programs for Montgomery County for over a decade, was appointed permanent director of the city's recreation and parks department by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake. Bayor, who starts immediately, will be charged with improving programming and crafting a strategic plan for the department, which came under fire for a lack of leadership and transparency by a volunteer transition team appointed by Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
December 13, 2011
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is getting a lesson in one of the major downsides of privatizing government services: When you ask outside groups to take over something the city has always done, their agendas won't always be the same as yours. That's what's happening with the mayor's plan to privatize some of Baltimore's recreation centers. One of the nonprofits that is bidding to take over two centers would provide programs not just for the kids that have traditionally been the rec centers' focus but also ex-criminal offenders and psychiatric patients.
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