Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRecreation Centers
IN THE NEWS

Recreation Centers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
At a community forum led by City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Wednesday night, residents expressed concerns over a variety of issues, including the parks and recreation department. The group of about 60 residents gathered in the Baltimore City Community College's Liberty Campus auditorium to ask a panel of city officials about issues including blighted houses, dirt bike laws, attracting new retail businesses to their neighborhoods and the potential closure of city recreation centers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Thank you to The Sun for your hard-hitting, front page article highlighting the abuse of power by some members of the Baltimore City Police Department ("Undue force," Sept. 28). "A disturbing pattern" and "frightful human toll" are apt expressions used in the article to which we must add "unacceptable racist practices against African Americans" to seemingly describe a culture in the Baltimore City Police Department which we all know continues to this day. We citizens of Baltimore need proof that severe measures are being taken to correct Baltimore's "national reputation of not being a professional and effective department," as you state in the article.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Ten city recreation centers in areas with "high concentrations of at-risk youth" will remain open for extended hours throughout the summer to provide a haven for children. The governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention is funding the extended hours, said Shaun Adamec, a spokesman for Gov. Martin O'Malley. O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will announce the locations of the recreation centers at a news conference this afternoon. The city recently extended hours for swimming pools for Wednesday and today to help residents cope with the heat wave.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Several Baltimore City Council members expressed skepticism Monday about a plan to sell some downtown parking garages, while others began lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration to claim funds from the sale for recreation centers in their districts. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said he has concerns about the administration's proposal to raise up to $60 million for recreation centers by selling four of the city's 17 parking garages. Young noted the four garages are money-makers - bringing in $400,000 annually - and questioned whether it's wise to forgo future revenue for a quick cash infusion.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
A day after a hearing with Recreation and Parks officials, residents and City Council members were questioning the mayor's plans for consolidating and renovating or closing the city's 55 recreation centers. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has said that two dozen centers could be turned over to private operators or closed at the end of December. At the hearing, Bill Tyler, chief of recreation, said his agency's objective was to keep all the centers open with their full hours and staff.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
City swimming pools would open on a staggered schedule this summer, three fire companies would be closed daily and the 311 call center would be available less frequently under the preliminary budget unveiled Wednesday by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Rawlings-Blake would not raise taxes, but residents would be required to pay for bulk trash pickups beginning Jan. 1. The mayor's operating budget would increase spending by about 1 percent, to $2.29 billion, while filling a gap between projected revenue and expenses by cutting $65 million in services.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | July 17, 1991
Amid warnings that the city is operating nearly twice as many recreation centers as it can afford to properly staff, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday endorsed a consultant's report that recommends closing as many as eight city recreation centers and consolidating others.At the same time, however, Mr. Schmoke said he would like to keep more recreation centers open on Saturdays to give children who are not in school someplace to go."I can tell you I'm a big proponent of having centers open on Saturdays, but we can't do that and maintain" all the rec centers the city now operates, the mayor said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | February 24, 2007
The proposal was supposed to enrich the programming at the Roosevelt Recreation Center in Hampden, city officials and social service providers said. College students were to be brought in as tutors at the center's already popular after-school program. Another bonus: Instructors from Baltimore City Community College would be at the disposal of those studying to take the General Educational Development test. But some particularly vocal Hampden residents saw only drawbacks, decrying the plan as a takeover of the facility - an illustration of the challenge facing city recreation officials who want to supplement their tight budgets with nonprofit assistance.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
/TC Saying increased recreational programs are more effective than curfews, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday announced that 33 city recreation centers and 23 swimming pools will have expanded hours immediately in hopes of keeping idle youths off the streets.Mr. Schmoke, who has opposed curfews in recent weeks, said the new hours should offer new activities for people 14 years old and older."Our studies show that more recreation programs are better than curfews," the mayor said yesterday as he stood on the athletic field at the Liberty Recreational Center on Maine Avenue in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1996
Faced with competition from better-equipped Police Athletic Leagues and a shrinking city budget, Baltimore's recreation centers are on track to shut down completely or offer children deteriorating facilities and broken-down equipment.To fix the problem, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is ordering the department to pay more of its own way.Schmoke has assembled a 12-member task force of city leaders, private citizens and business executives to figure out how the Department of Recreation and Parks can generate money.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Two men were killed and another critically injured in a shooting at a recreation center playground in the city's Edgewood neighborhood Sunday, police said. Officers were dispatched to the scene, at Allendale Street and Colborne Road near the Edgewood-Lyndhurst Recreation Center, at 6:52 p.m., police said. Cedric Stancil, 18, of the 4700 block of Williston St., was pronounced dead at a local hospital at about 7:40 p.m. Four hours later, Jamal Campbell, 20, of the 2300 block of Winchester St., was also pronounced dead.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jason Tashea | February 18, 2014
Mayor Rawlings-Blake's State of the City address last week called for the creation of curfew drop-off centers. This policy aims to lower delinquency and victimization among our city's youth, while getting at-risk youth needed services. These are goals worth achieving; however, curfew centers are not a proven solution to either issue. First, youth delinquency primarily occurs after school and not during curfew hours. In Baltimore City, a curfew violation applies to youth under 17 years old who are either out during school hours or who are out past 11 p.m. on a weekday or 12 a.m. on a weekend.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
A failing Baltimore City Public School system, and lack of both after school programs and recreation centers will continue to increase gang recruitment unless the city acts now. It's not a coincidence that Quintin Poindexter was led behind Windsor Hill Elementary School and killed ( "Family watched, helpless, as gang took their son," Aug. 6). The Baltimore City Schools are becoming gang recruiting institutions and their playgrounds are becoming the killing fields. The city has closed down most recreation centers, and many after school programs are non-existent.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 4, 2013
Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby said he is trying to set up a community meeting, possibly next week, to discuss the closing of the Roosevelt Park Recreation Center for up to a month to repair a broken water line. The city Department of Recreation and Parks closed the Roosevelt Park center at Falls Road and West 36th Street on March 28 after the kitchen drainage pipe broke, said spokeswoman Kia McLeod. A sign on the front door says, "Center closed until further notice due to mechanical repair emergencies.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Inside the former Barclay Recreation Center on Saturday, the smell of fumes filled the air as a band of volunteers spent the morning putting on a fresh coat of paint in anticipation of its reopening under new management later this year. The city's Department of Recreation and Parks shut down the center last August after 32 years and handed it over to the neighboring Barclay Elementary and Middle School. Volunteers from the area finally started working earlier this year to get the facility back up and running.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | September 4, 1991
Former Mayor Clarence H. "Du" Burns yesterday proposed charging fees at more city recreation centers as an alternative to closing them completely -- something he said incumbent Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has been all too willing to do.Stepping up his campaign to oust Mr. Schmoke in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary, Mr. Burns said the city should convert some existing rec centers into specialized facilities that charge a fee for programs such as swimming clinics or basketball instruction. The income from the fees would allow the city to subsidize the other recreation centers.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore's recreation chief Bill Tyler is leaving city government to work in Montgomery County, city officials said Friday. Tyler, who earned $94,000 annually, was in charge of implementing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to consolidate recreation centers — closing and privatizing some — in an effort to cut costs while better focusing on the recreation centers that would remain open. Tyler's last day in Baltimore is Feb. 15. He will be the Southern Parks Division Chief of Montgomery Parks, officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has hired a new director of recreation and parks, choosing an experienced manager who has headed similar agencies in three cities. Ernest W. Burkeen Jr., 64, who previously ran recreation and parks departments in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Detroit, will begin in Baltimore Dec. 17, the mayor is scheduled to announce Tuesday. "Ernest Burkeen is a nationally respected leader in his field with a great track record of success improving parks and recreational opportunities for urban communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.