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By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1994
Packing auditoriums and lobbies of the Baltimore Convention Center, recovering drug addicts embraced and shared a message this weekend that there is hope -- even for the most hard-core among them.More than 16,000 people attended the 24th annual world convention of Narcotics Anonymous -- its largest and one of the biggest conventions ever held in Baltimore.City officials were not available to confirm whether it was the largest convention, but convention center volunteers said it ranked among the biggest.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Jon B. Singer, a successful Baltimore businessman who was active in Jewish philanthropic causes that ranged from helping those suffering from drug abuse to mentoring young men and women starting businesses, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 31 at his Pikesville home. He was 71. "His compassion and generosity knew no bounds. Even though he ran several businesses and was a devoted family man, he always found time to help those who were in need," said Jerry Sutton, who was executive director of House of Hope, a Reisterstown Road recovery facility that Mr. Singer founded for Jewish men struggling to overcome drug addiction and substance abuse.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
Supported by neighbors in West Baltimore, a transitional home for 28 recovering drug addicts will rise in their midst and be ready for occupancy next summer.Carrington House, a $991,000 three-story residence at 3500 Clifton Ave., will offer a structured recovery program for up to two years for formerly homeless men who have jobs or are on their way to employment and self-sufficiency.The groundbreaking for the house will be celebrated from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday "to let people learn more and have some fun, jazz and barbecue," said M. Gregory Cantori, executive director of Light Street Housing Corp.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
The sniffling began about 15 minutes into Chris Herren's speech. As the former NBA player recounted his battle with drug addiction, students throughout Southern High School's auditorium looked around to see who was crying. No one needed to look far. For the past four years, Herren — whose story of substance abuse was the subject of a 2011 ESPN documentary, "Unguarded" — has moved crowds with his gritty message at high schools, colleges and prisons nationwide. His talk at Southern High came at a time when county police say they're dealing with an increase in heroin use. Since the start of year, Anne Arundel County has seen 17 fatal drug overdoses — 13 of them involving heroin — according to county police spokesman Justin Mulcahy.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2002
The nondescript building on North Clinton Street in Highlandtown was a daily contradiction. Upstairs, at meetings of Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous, addicts described their struggles to stay clean. And downstairs was a neighborhood bar. When the building went up for auction, Larry DeAngelis, a recovering heroin addict who runs of a string of halfway houses, had an idea: Why not turn the place into a bar without a bar? The result -- a restaurant and hangout for recovering addicts called Stepping Stones -- still has knotty pine walls, a loud jukebox and lots of smoke.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
A task force of city officials, planners and social services providers met last night to discuss ways to regulate group homes for recovering addicts, recently released prisoners and homeless people. They have until Feb. 28 to come up with a set of recommendations. Group homes came under scrutiny after the slaying of three men in a home for recovering drug and alcohol abusers in Remington. A fourth man was wounded in the Jan. 10 attack, which police say was sparked by a $300 marijuana debt.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Her fight to make Walbrook Junction a healthy place for children has gripped Georgine Edgerton so long that she was elevated last year to the Baltimore Women's Hall of Fame.But even at 71, this is no time to quit.Edgerton is now talking up the Light Street Housing Corp., a private, nonprofit provider of affordable housing, to her neighbors in West Baltimore. The agency wants to build an anti-drug center to replace two abandoned houses that have drawn the homeless, addicts, prostitutes, arsonists, rats and neighbors' scorn.
NEWS
June 5, 2008
Should live-in drug and other treatment centers in Baltimore be allowed to locate in residential areas without any advance approval from the community? As a matter of fairness and federal law, the answer is yes. Although the issue has been batted around for years, a Justice Department investigation should persuade the City Council to do the right thing and change the city's discriminatory zoning policies. Under a long-standing city law, smaller group homes for recovering addicts, alcoholics or mentally disabled people need City Council approval before they can open in neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | November 29, 1991
For the uninitiated, walking into a new Severna Park shop for recovering addicts is more than puzzling. It's downright curious.Whoever heard of a God Box? Or a Recovery Rabbit?But to those familiar with the 12-step programs for alcoholics and others, the ideas reflected in the store's wares are as familiar asthe day they had their last drink or snorted their last line."The truth will set you free . . . but first it will p-- you off," readsthe slogan on one T-shirt."Everything I ever let go of had claw marks on it," rues another, picturing a cat clinging, spread-eagled, to a brick wall.
NEWS
August 2, 2004
FOR NEARLY a decade, Baltimore has been getting a pass on its discriminatory and illegal zoning laws that govern substance abuse treatment centers and group homes for recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. Finally, the city has seen fit to address this problem. The administration of Mayor Martin O'Malley has wisely recognized that reforms are considerably overdue. But more to the point, it has realized that maintaining the status quo would land the city in court, trying to defend an indefensible city ordinance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
G eorge Gregory "Blue" Epps, a recovering addict and an addiction counselor whose struggle was depicted in "The Corner," the book which later became a critically acclaimed HBO miniseries, died of undetermined causes Nov. 15 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Highlandtown resident was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for a cause of death," said his wife of nine years, the former Valerie Bolling. Mr. Epps was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
George Gregory "Blue" Epps, a recovering addict and an addiction counselor whose struggle was depicted in "The Corner," the book which later became a critically acclaimed HBO miniseries, died of undetermined causes Nov. 15 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Highlandtown resident was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for a cause of death," said his wife of nine years, the former Valerie Bolling. Mr. Epps was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore. As a youngster, he showed a talent for painting and drawing.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
About 100 recovering drug addicts marched on City Hall yesterday to protest public funding cuts that will cripple a well-known recovery program. Chanting the name of the organization, I Can't We Can, they drew the attention of City Councilman Bernard "Jack" Young, who said he is powerless to help but "stands in solidarity." Other city employees stopped to watch the group pray and tell stories about addiction and survival. Al Moy?, who credits the program with his recovery from addiction, said lives and public safety are at risk if I Can't We Can closes its doors.
NEWS
June 5, 2008
Should live-in drug and other treatment centers in Baltimore be allowed to locate in residential areas without any advance approval from the community? As a matter of fairness and federal law, the answer is yes. Although the issue has been batted around for years, a Justice Department investigation should persuade the City Council to do the right thing and change the city's discriminatory zoning policies. Under a long-standing city law, smaller group homes for recovering addicts, alcoholics or mentally disabled people need City Council approval before they can open in neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 17, 2007
Marshall H. Pinnix Sr., a retired insurance executive, volunteer and a Sherlock Holmes fan, died Dec. 8 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care of complications from brain surgery. The longtime Stoneleigh resident was 80. Mr. Pinnix was born and raised in Oxford, N.C. After graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1949 with a bachelor's degree in accounting, he moved to New York City when he took an accounting position with Texaco Oil Co. He lived in Puerto Rico and Dakar, Senegal, before leaving Texaco and moving to Baltimore in 1955, when he went to work as an assistant vice president for Mercantile Safe Deposit and Trust Co. In the early 1980s, he left the bank and became a group manager and senior financial analyst at Alexander and Alexander, now AON Corp.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | February 28, 2007
The victims were middle-aged recovering addicts living in a group home in North Baltimore's Remington neighborhood. The gunmen, police believe, were young drug dealers who had come to collect. Nathaniel Gulliver walked to a nearby ATM and drained his bank account to help his friend, Antwon Arthur, pay off a $300 marijuana debt. But the $140 he had to offer wasn't enough. The gunmen corralled five residents into a second-floor room and fatally shot Gulliver, Arthur and Steven Matthews. Two other residents escaped.
NEWS
By From staff reports | June 3, 2000
In Baltimore City Girl, 8, hit by car while crossing street, is in critical condition An 8-year-old girl was in critical condition with a head injury at Johns Hopkins Hospital last night after being hit by a car when she dashed into traffic in the 1100 block of Calvert St. Philisha Johnson, who was staying with her mother in a Mount Vernon area shelter for homeless families, tried to follow her mother, Annette Butler, across the street to a 7-Eleven convenience...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Declaring America's "war on drugs" a failure, retired U.S. Sen Harold Hughes exhorted recovering addicts and alcoholics yesterday to fight brazenly for more treatment programs and health coverage.To do that, he said, recovering addicts need to move beyond their tradition of anonymity into political activity.Mr. Hughes, a one-time Iowa truck driver who was jailed several times for drunkenness before beginning 39 years of sobriety, visited Baltimore yesterday to launch what he hopes will be a national movement of political activism by a group accustomed to secrecy.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 22, 2005
You know who you are. Kenneth, Leon, William, Joseph and Walter. You know why I'm calling your names out in print today. And Arthur, Tina, Gordon, Andre, Tory and Shawn - where are you? Give us a call. Last we heard, you were all looking for help. You all recently contacted the coordinator of a Baltimore program that tries to pull ex-offenders (former drug dealers, drug addicts) out of the horrid cycle of jail-to-street-to-jail and get them into something better - something like a good job, something like a decent life.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 21, 2005
DEAR BALTIMORE drug dealers: It's like this. You either want to live a long, relatively happy life or die young and horribly (or, if you're lucky, maybe middle-aged and horribly). You either want to have a home, family and friends (maybe even DirecTV), or go back to prison. You either want to end up like Clinton Young, dead from multiple gunshot wounds, or like Eric Jordan, an ex-offender who works for a mortgage company and lives at the city-county line in "Almost Catonsville." There are more and better ways for you to get out of the life for good now -- even if you're reading this in a prison cell -- so you have choices.
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