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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
Back in the early days of compact discs, some classical music shoppers were known to be wary of the unfamiliar record labels that started popping up in the bins, especially the ones with rock-bottom prices. One budget label, in particular, stood out for its straightforward look, abundance of titles and largely unknown performers: Naxos. What became clear very quickly after that company's launch in 1987 was that the music-making could be taken very seriously. And the product just kept growing and improving.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service recently certified a new freshwater-division white perch record and an Atlantic division cobia record. On Sept. 5, James Stiars of Baldwin caught a 1.7-pound white perch in Loch Raven Reservoir, breaking the previous record of 1.62 pounds set by John Williams in 2008, also in Loch Raven. "It was my first cast of the day," Stiars told the DNR. "I was using a Shad Rat crank-bait, and I thought I had a largemouth bass on the line.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A National Archives and Records Administration employee pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling government property — including a recording of Babe Ruth's voice — and selling it on eBay, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Leslie Charles Waffen, 66, worked for the NARA since 1969, swiped at least 955 sound recordings worth $30,000 and stashed them in his home or sold them online, according to prosecutors, who charged Waffen last week with stealing from the United States.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Stevenson has already beaten one of two teams that shared last year's Middle Atlantic Conference title and will go for the sweep with a visit to Lycoming on Saturday. The Mustangs (4-0, 3-0 in the league) defeated Lebanon Valley, 20-14, two weeks ago, but coach Ed Hottle admitted that tangling with the Warriors, who have won 15 league championships, is the litmus test of the season. “They're the big dog in the conference,” Hottle said Wednesday. “They're the defending conference champion, and they're the team we aspire to be. They're perennially very good in the conference, they're well-coached, they're big and physical, they don't make mistakes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 18, 1992
Glenn Gould did not like to be touched.It was partly that neurasthenic fear of physical contact that led him (at the age of 31) to abandon the stage in 1964. But the great Canadian pianist did not abandon his audience. For Gould's retreat to recording and TV studios allowed him to work tirelessly to perfect a vision of musical performance unaffected by the vagaries of time and space.Gould -- who died 10 years ago at the age of 50 -- was not only a great artist, he was also a commercially viable one. That is why his record company, Sony Classical, has just initiated a huge two-year project to reissue almost everything Gould committed to the microphone and the camera.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 22, 1991
When famous musicians die, there's usually a flurry of activity as the record companies try to release their final recordings. This is the case in the continuing efforts of Deutsche Grammophon to showcase the late Leonard Bernstein and Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the most popular conductor-composer and pianist of the second half of the 20th century.When Bernstein died, he left his second Mahler cycle -- there was an earlier one for CBS (now Sony) records -- uncompleted because he was not able to record the Symphony No. 8 (the "Symphony of a Thousand")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 23, 1994
The history of collecting is littered with unfathomable excess. From Imelda Marcos' shoes to Margaret Woodbury Strong, who collected bathtubs (but was never known to take a bath), there are people who collect with such obsessive repetition that one can scarcely believe they're human.Among the common manifestations of this phenomenon are those who collect moments that exist at the vanishing point, but are captured on video and sound recordings. There are times when I look about my house and am astonished to see the history of Western music collected four times over.
BUSINESS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
To the owners of Record & Tape Traders, it was only rock 'n' roll.But they liked it, and they sold it. Hot bands like R.E.M. and Nirvana, captured live on the bootleg compact discs that are prized by hard-core fans and collectors.Now the chain of Baltimore-area record stores has been swept into a nationwide crackdown on illegal recordings, and the two owners could be dancin' to the Jailhouse Rock."It was a cool thing to us. It was a cool thing to our customers," said one owner, Steven Smolen, explaining why he sold the unauthorized concert recordings -- despite having been placed on probation for similar charges in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 22, 2002
This past Wednesday would have been Glenn Gould's 70th birthday. Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the irreplaceable pianist's death. To mark the two occasions, Sony Classical has released a must-have, double commemoration: "Glenn Gould: A State of Wonder" (Sony Classical S3K 87703) - Gould's two downright historic recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations, from 1955 and 1981. It's fitting that the Goldberg Variations turned out to be the musical bookends of Gould's life. The 1955 recording, full of astonishing finger work and fresh insights into Bach's genius, made him an instant star.
NEWS
By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | May 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - A tape made hours after the Sept. 11 attacks that recorded statements of air-traffic controllers on Long Island was destroyed and never given to authorities, a federal investigation found yesterday. The hourlong tape of six controllers who tracked the planes flying toward the World Trade Center was shredded a few months later by a manager at the New York Air Route Traffic Control Center in Ronkonkoma. The manager, identified by officials as Kevin Delaney, told investigators that making the tape contradicted Federal Aviation Administration policy and that the recordings were "of minimal value" because controllers also gave written statements about the hijackings.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Howard County Council member Courtney Watson attempts to justify her inaccurate and formulaic attacks on the record of her Republican opponent in the county executive race, Sen. Alan Kittleman, record with "I believe that calling out an opponent's record is fair in an election. " Isn't it time someone closely examines her record for a calling-out? How many more not-so-temporary trailer classrooms have been installed during her tenure on the Howard County school board and the council?
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
TORONTO - Earning home-field advantage throughout the postseason was the Orioles' final goal of the regular season, but since winning the American League East 10 days ago, their greater focus was positioning themselves for a deep postseason run. They chased the Los Angeles Angels down to the final three days of the regular season for the American League's best record, but following the Orioles' 4-2 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays on Friday night...
NEWS
September 24, 2014
Legislation introduced Monday in the City Council would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year. Though the proposal leaves many questions unanswered regarding how evidence from the devices could be used, who would have access to it and, not insignificantly, how the new equipment would be paid for, we think on balance that the benefits of the technology far outweigh the costs both in terms of improving police-community relations...
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
SPORTS
Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
John Harbaugh walked toward the back of the bench to exhort the fans, wagged four fingers in the air to signal the start of the final quarter and welcomed big defensive tackle Haloti Ngata to the sideline with a flying chest bump that left the Ravens' head coach falling backward.   Despite one of the most trying weeks in franchise history, Harbaugh told general manager Ozzie Newsome on Wednesday that he sensed his team was ready to play well and was he ever prophetic. The Ravens broke the trend of close games against their biggest rival by dominating the Pittsburgh Steelers, 26-6, in front of an announced 71,181 at M&T Bank Stadium and a prime-time television audience.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
SHREWSBURY TOWNSHIP, Pa. - A few days before Rita Hofler and her 17-year-old son, Kevin Gehring, were found shot to death here, the woman's estranged husband began to make a series of digital voice recordings. Retired Loyola College professor Donald B. Hofler talks about his finances and his funeral arrangements. He says that, at age 70, he no longer wants to live. And, in a recording played yesterday in a Pennsylvania courtroom, he discusses his plan to kill his wife of 15 years. "Rita's supposed to come over tomorrow," Hofler, who is charged in the slayings, says in a low, groggy voice on the recording.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
At least 18 months before an arson fire that killed seven members of the Dawson family in East Baltimore, the father was chasing drug dealers off his front stoop to protect his children, court records show. And in the month before the family's house was set ablaze Oct. 16, Carnell Dawson and his wife, Angela, made repeated calls to police for help. Their voices - often frustrated or desperate - can be heard on tape recordings provided by police to The Sun. In one call, made by Carnell Dawson on Oct. 1, he complains that several dealers had surrounded his house and were menacing his family, apparently in retaliation.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As one of the shortest players on the Morgan State football team, Herb Walker Jr. has a nickname among his Bears teammates: "Smurf. " The running back, who recently confessed to being 1 inch shorter than his already diminutive listed height of 5 feet 8, has heard worse from defenses. The insults don't bother him as much as the assumptions behind them. Opponents tell Walker he's "soft. Or I don't run hard," he said. "But they'll feel me when I get the ball. " Neither label fit after the 19-year-old Walker set a school record a week ago. In Morgan State's 26-23 loss Saturday to Holy Cross, 26-23, the sophomore rushed for 271 yards and two touchdowns on 29 carries.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
If increasingly extreme weather events around the world weren't alarming enough, the latest monitoring by the World Meteorological Organization shows last year was the worst ever for rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their report released Tuesday demonstrates why efforts to curb climate change deserve to be a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. The WMO tracks not just the greenhouse gases emitted by power plants, motor vehicles, factories and other major contributors but what the net effect is on the atmosphere since a certain amount of carbon dioxide is naturally absorbed by plants and oceans.
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