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NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | August 26, 1994
Troy Carver will cap weeks of hard work when he takes the stage tomorrow night in the First Assembly of God's fourth annual passion play, "No Other Name but Jesus."Besides having the lead role in the production, Mr. Carver is helping direct it, record the musical score and coordinate its filming.The undertaking has left the 25-year-old weary but looking forward to the culmination of many long hours in his Manchester recording studio, UK Recording."It's been a tremendous job," he said. This year marks his second of playing Jesus and his fourth with a role in the play.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
NBA veteran Metta World Peace hasn't been seen in the NBA since the New York Knicks waived him in February, but it appears he's been in the recording studio since then - and he's showing some love to Baltimore while in there. Hot New Hip Hop dropped the artist formerly known as Ron Artest's new single, "Baltimore," last night, with a little bit of an explanation as to why the Queens-born forward is singing about Baltimore. “People often ask why am I obsessed with Baltimore,” Artest told the site.
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NEWS
June 14, 1998
The Unified Jazz Ensemble, a quartet that plays at 49 West Coffeehouse in Annapolis, has won a career enhancement award from Billboard Music, the recording and music publishing subsidiary of Billboard magazine.The award, for best instrumental performance of an original piece, was given for "Hypothesis" by its saxophone player, Jeff Antoniuk.The prize is $1,000 and 25 free hours of studio time at Billboard's recording facilities in Oklahoma City.The performance of "Hypothesis" also will be included on a compact disc of winners in Billboard's annual songwriting contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Names are not what they seem for the Baltimore rock quintet Vinny Vegas. Start with the band's name: It is not the alter ego of lead singer Scott Siskind, but rather an obscure reference to a professional wrestler from the early '90s. Then there's the title of the group's debut album, November's “The Big White Whale,” whose vinyl release will be celebrated at a Vinny Vegas-headlining show at Metro Gallery on Saturday. Despite cover art that depicts a diver next to a massive whale, Siskind said the title has nothing to do with Herman Melville's novel.
NEWS
March 29, 1999
Lillian Shedd McMurry, 77, who stumbled on a cache of old blues records in 1949 and was so taken by the pure, haunting sound that within a year she had opened a recording studio, died March 18 at a hospital near her home in Jackson, Miss.As the founder of Trumpet Records, she had been the first to record two giants of the Delta blues, Sonny Boy Williamson and Elmore James.Pub Date: 3/29/99
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
Michael Jackson, the Ravens wide receiver, already has one office in the city -- on 33rd Street. Now he is setting up another -- in East Baltimore.At a downtown news conference yesterday, Jackson announced that his new record production company, Big Play Entertainment, will be based on Biddle Street in East Baltimore. The football star said the company will provide record deals -- and eventually jobs -- to Baltimore-area residents."Wherever I am, I feel it is my home, and it's my job to give back to it," said Jackson, who will be the company's president and primary financial source.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
The upstart recording studio in the heart of Hampden had big aspirations in the rap business and a tough-sounding label name - Stash House Records - to help make its mark in a world where street credibility and thuggish machismo can drive sales. Federal prosecutors now say the name was fitting. In court papers unsealed last week, authorities accused two men of using the Stash House Records studio, formerly tucked among the boutique shops, cafes and used furniture stores on "The Avenue," as a place to sell and store heroin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 17, 2007
As a performer, Angelique Kidjo is too free-spirited for the recording studio. She likens it to jail. So during the making of her latest album, the sparkling Djin Djin, the world-fusion artist worked closely with producer Tony Visconti to capture the vibrancy and spontaneity of her stage shows. "The recording studio, it's too fake for me," says Kidjo, who headlines Lisner Auditorium in Washington tonight. "I come from a live background, you know. You're out there, and you're performing, and you record as you go along.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 19, 2008
Clustered on a grubby West Baltimore sidewalk, a dozen MCs spit rhymes into a microphone and sweat under the Saturday afternoon sun. Pedestrians and nearby street vendors pay little mind to the group of young men in their teens and early 20s. But a heated verbal battle is playing out in the middle of the pack. A confident and commanding Emmanuel "Tu-Khindz" Johnson faces a hesitant challenger in Sterling "Lil Geezy Hot" Barksdale. As cameras roll, Johnson unleashes a steady stream of barbs and ego-boosters.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,khunt@courant.com | September 16, 2008
So, rock star, you've got your own little recording studio and you're laying down some hot tracks while admiring how great you sound on tricked-out studio monitors. Big deal. Anyone can bring home those studio monitors - in our world, they're known as powered loudspeakers - and create an instant sound system with an iPod, computer or even a television. Here are two reasons the nonmusician might like pro-type studio monitors in your home: Imagine tossing your favorite stereo system in a trash compactor and out pop two bookshelf speakers, each with an amplifier, volume control, on-off switch and power cord, ready to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Biographical sources differ on when Maria Callas was born -- one book covers all bases by listing her birth date as "Dec. 2, 3 or 4, 1923" -- but every reputable source agrees that this soprano, who would have turned 90 this week, ranks among the best of the best. (Google is going with Dec. 2, which explains its nice graphic today .) Callas worship is a cliche by now (Terrence McNally built a whole play, "The Lisbon Traviata," around it), but for those of us fully under the spell of "La Divina," there's nothing cheap or silly about it. We find in Callas an incredibly satisfying artistry that gets to the heart and soul of opera -- of music, period.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,khunt@courant.com | September 16, 2008
So, rock star, you've got your own little recording studio and you're laying down some hot tracks while admiring how great you sound on tricked-out studio monitors. Big deal. Anyone can bring home those studio monitors - in our world, they're known as powered loudspeakers - and create an instant sound system with an iPod, computer or even a television. Here are two reasons the nonmusician might like pro-type studio monitors in your home: Imagine tossing your favorite stereo system in a trash compactor and out pop two bookshelf speakers, each with an amplifier, volume control, on-off switch and power cord, ready to play.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 19, 2008
Clustered on a grubby West Baltimore sidewalk, a dozen MCs spit rhymes into a microphone and sweat under the Saturday afternoon sun. Pedestrians and nearby street vendors pay little mind to the group of young men in their teens and early 20s. But a heated verbal battle is playing out in the middle of the pack. A confident and commanding Emmanuel "Tu-Khindz" Johnson faces a hesitant challenger in Sterling "Lil Geezy Hot" Barksdale. As cameras roll, Johnson unleashes a steady stream of barbs and ego-boosters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 17, 2007
As a performer, Angelique Kidjo is too free-spirited for the recording studio. She likens it to jail. So during the making of her latest album, the sparkling Djin Djin, the world-fusion artist worked closely with producer Tony Visconti to capture the vibrancy and spontaneity of her stage shows. "The recording studio, it's too fake for me," says Kidjo, who headlines Lisner Auditorium in Washington tonight. "I come from a live background, you know. You're out there, and you're performing, and you record as you go along.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | April 29, 2007
At Renegade Productions Inc. in Hunt Valley, 6,000 square feet of space contains hair and makeup stations, a "green" standby room (that happens to be purple), a casting room and a cavernous studio complete with professional lighting and thick black and green curtains that sweep around its perimeter. That soundproof studio can be transformed into nearly anything. For several Comcast commercials it was turned into what was supposed to be Cal Ripken's living room. For a Time Warner Cable training video, it became a baseball stadium, an amusement park and the Serengeti region of Africa.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Vaughan Mason's personalized license plate displays his lifelong credo for success: "FAILURE." Before you raise a jaundiced eye, keep in mind that he's a musician who is still getting paid for work he did in the 1970s and '80s. And if you were part of the nightclub or roller-skating scene then, chances are you're familiar with one of his efforts: Bounce. Roccccccccccccccck. Skate. Rolllllllllllllllllllllll. Bounce. It's been almost 27 years since Mason recorded the pulsating ode to roller-skating, "Bounce, Rock, Skate, Roll," which took him from living on the sofa of a friend's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn (five houses down from Spike Lee, no less)
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
NBA veteran Metta World Peace hasn't been seen in the NBA since the New York Knicks waived him in February, but it appears he's been in the recording studio since then - and he's showing some love to Baltimore while in there. Hot New Hip Hop dropped the artist formerly known as Ron Artest's new single, "Baltimore," last night, with a little bit of an explanation as to why the Queens-born forward is singing about Baltimore. “People often ask why am I obsessed with Baltimore,” Artest told the site.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Vaughan Mason's personalized license plate displays his lifelong credo for success: "FAILURE." Before you raise a jaundiced eye, keep in mind that he's a musician who is still getting paid for work he did in the 1970s and '80s. And if you were part of the nightclub or roller-skating scene then, chances are you're familiar with one of his efforts: Bounce. Roccccccccccccccck. Skate. Rolllllllllllllllllllllll. Bounce. It's been almost 27 years since Mason recorded the pulsating ode to roller-skating, "Bounce, Rock, Skate, Roll," which took him from living on the sofa of a friend's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn (five houses down from Spike Lee, no less)
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
The upstart recording studio in the heart of Hampden had big aspirations in the rap business and a tough-sounding label name - Stash House Records - to help make its mark in a world where street credibility and thuggish machismo can drive sales. Federal prosecutors now say the name was fitting. In court papers unsealed last week, authorities accused two men of using the Stash House Records studio, formerly tucked among the boutique shops, cafes and used furniture stores on "The Avenue," as a place to sell and store heroin.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
Hip-hop musician Senica Lee can rap about a range of topics, from poverty and violence to automobiles and oil changes. The latter topics have been earning the 22-year-old Glen Burnie resident some local fame since he won a contest sponsored by Win Kelly Mitsubishi in Clarksville. His competition was nine other musical acts. "Senica was so overwhelming in meeting with us, with his energy and ... his star quality," said Kevin Bell, president of the Win Kelly Automotive Super Stores. In addition to giving Lee the prize of $1,500 and using his music in radio and television commercials, the company hired him to appear in five TV ads for its Mitsubishi, Kia and Chevrolet dealerships.
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