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NEWS
May 20, 1999
Bruce Fairbairn, 49, a record producer who started as a musician and produced some of rock's most successful acts, including Aerosmith, AC/DC, Van Halen, Kiss and Bon Jovi, was found dead Monday in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The cause of death was not immediately known.Pub Date: 5/20/99
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
"Mamma mia, here I go again / My my, how can I resist you?" If only you could. But, oh, those alliterative "m's," those 17 syncopated syllables - chances are that by the time you reached the end of the first sentence, ABBA's familiar melody had forcibly taken possession of every single one of your brain cells. And there it will remain, until it is driven out by a different tune that's equally ... er, unforgettable. "If you change your mind, I'm the first in line / Honey, I'm still free, take a chance on me."
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NEWS
December 20, 2007
JOEL DORN, 65 Grammy-winning producer Joel Dorn, a record producer who worked with Roberta Flack, Bette Midler, the Neville Brothers, Herbie Mann, Les McCann, Keith Jarrett and other musicians, has died. Mr. Dorn won back-to-back Grammys for record of the year in 1972 and 1973 for the Roberta Flack hits "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" and "Killing Me Softly With His Song."
NEWS
December 20, 2007
JOEL DORN, 65 Grammy-winning producer Joel Dorn, a record producer who worked with Roberta Flack, Bette Midler, the Neville Brothers, Herbie Mann, Les McCann, Keith Jarrett and other musicians, has died. Mr. Dorn won back-to-back Grammys for record of the year in 1972 and 1973 for the Roberta Flack hits "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" and "Killing Me Softly With His Song."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
"Mamma mia, here I go again / My my, how can I resist you?" If only you could. But, oh, those alliterative "m's," those 17 syncopated syllables - chances are that by the time you reached the end of the first sentence, ABBA's familiar melody had forcibly taken possession of every single one of your brain cells. And there it will remain, until it is driven out by a different tune that's equally ... er, unforgettable. "If you change your mind, I'm the first in line / Honey, I'm still free, take a chance on me."
NEWS
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Candid friends of Phil Spector admit that the bodyguards who prowled the night with the famed record producer were really in the business of protecting him from one dangerous person - himself. So it's telling that, five months ago, Spector apparently decided that the wild life was so far behind him that he didn't need a shadow. He came to that decision at a shining, hopeful moment in his life. His friends say he had been sober for three years and far removed from the old days when he was notorious as a raging, erratic genius with a penchant for guns.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 9, 1991
Look out, Mick Jagger -- your newest competition could be . . . a bunch of turtles and a plastic fashion doll.That's right -- Barbie is coming out with an album next week. And the newest hot group isn't INXS, it's TMNT. (That's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to the unhip or the grown-up.)When the Turtles appear live at the Baltimore Arena beginning tonight, complete suspension of disbelief is the name of the game: The producers of the show want audiences to believe that Michaelangelo's playing lead guitar and Raphael is wailin' on the sax.And that's with only three reptilian fingers on each turtle limb.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
Not so long ago, if you owned a guitar and wrote your own songs your chances of ending up in a studio, recording your very own album, were about as likely as being struck by lightning while cashing a winning lottery ticket on the way to pick up your Nobel prize.But good news, guitar players! Your odds have dramatically improved. All you need now is your guitar, your songs and some spare time.Oh, and be sure to bring your checkbook.For in the same tradition as would-be Great American Novelists who dip into the rent money to pay a vanity publisher to print their tome, guitar-toting dreamers by the stage-full are no longer waiting to be discovered: They're laying out big bucks -- upward of $10,000 in some cases -- to record their own albums.
NEWS
By Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis and Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Famed rock music producer Phil Spector was charged yesterday with murdering an aspiring actress in his hilltop mansion in February. After the shooting, Spector told his chauffeur, "I think I killed somebody," according to a police report of the killing. Spector was carrying a handgun, the chauffeur told police. The partial report, obtained by the Los Angeles Times, provides new details about the death of Lana Clarkson, 40, an actress and nightclub hostess, which Spector in an earlier interview attributed to suicide.
FEATURES
By Richard Cromelin and Richard Cromelin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Linda Perry looks every bit the rock star she always wanted to be, wearing leather pants and a denim shirt and striking a haughty pose as she lays a guitar arpeggio into a majestic rock arrangement. But Perry isn't playing to a packed arena. Leaning against the soundboard in a recording studio, she has an audience of half a dozen or so, including the members of Lillix, a Canadian band whose song "Tomorrow" Perry co-wrote and produced last year. Today she's adding this guitar part and helping the four young women redo some vocals for the track's release as a single.
NEWS
By Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis and Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Famed rock music producer Phil Spector was charged yesterday with murdering an aspiring actress in his hilltop mansion in February. After the shooting, Spector told his chauffeur, "I think I killed somebody," according to a police report of the killing. Spector was carrying a handgun, the chauffeur told police. The partial report, obtained by the Los Angeles Times, provides new details about the death of Lana Clarkson, 40, an actress and nightclub hostess, which Spector in an earlier interview attributed to suicide.
FEATURES
By Richard Cromelin and Richard Cromelin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Linda Perry looks every bit the rock star she always wanted to be, wearing leather pants and a denim shirt and striking a haughty pose as she lays a guitar arpeggio into a majestic rock arrangement. But Perry isn't playing to a packed arena. Leaning against the soundboard in a recording studio, she has an audience of half a dozen or so, including the members of Lillix, a Canadian band whose song "Tomorrow" Perry co-wrote and produced last year. Today she's adding this guitar part and helping the four young women redo some vocals for the track's release as a single.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 23, 2003
Laurel Canyon features Frances McDormand giving her all as a Los Angeles record producer who lives and works in a contemporary post-hippie whirl of pop art, hedonism and substance abuse. She has a disc to finish so she can't stop the carnival when her Harvard M.D. son (Christian Bale) arrives at her door with his fiancee (Kate Beckinsale), who has a Harvard M.D. and (almost) Ph.D. He's come to take a pyschiatric residency at an L.A. clinic while his bride-to-be finishes her thesis on genomics.
NEWS
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Candid friends of Phil Spector admit that the bodyguards who prowled the night with the famed record producer were really in the business of protecting him from one dangerous person - himself. So it's telling that, five months ago, Spector apparently decided that the wild life was so far behind him that he didn't need a shadow. He came to that decision at a shining, hopeful moment in his life. His friends say he had been sober for three years and far removed from the old days when he was notorious as a raging, erratic genius with a penchant for guns.
NEWS
May 20, 1999
Bruce Fairbairn, 49, a record producer who started as a musician and produced some of rock's most successful acts, including Aerosmith, AC/DC, Van Halen, Kiss and Bon Jovi, was found dead Monday in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The cause of death was not immediately known.Pub Date: 5/20/99
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
It's Saturday night in Annapolis.Tourists emerge from restaurants and saunter toward the water. Impeccably dressed midshipmen sit on benches. And drunken, rowdy 20-somethings pile into bars to bop their heads to the sound of their favorite band.This eclectic mix of visitors and locals is nothing new to Annapolis. Yet, walking down Main Street, a passerby can catch a glimmer of something new emanating from the bars. Music. Foot-thumping, gut-jerking, distinctively original music.Barely five years ago, Annapolis was known as a place to hear cover bands running through the usual play list from "Brown-Eyed Girl" to "Margaritaville."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 23, 2003
Laurel Canyon features Frances McDormand giving her all as a Los Angeles record producer who lives and works in a contemporary post-hippie whirl of pop art, hedonism and substance abuse. She has a disc to finish so she can't stop the carnival when her Harvard M.D. son (Christian Bale) arrives at her door with his fiancee (Kate Beckinsale), who has a Harvard M.D. and (almost) Ph.D. He's come to take a pyschiatric residency at an L.A. clinic while his bride-to-be finishes her thesis on genomics.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
It's Saturday night in Annapolis.Tourists emerge from restaurants and saunter toward the water. Impeccably dressed midshipmen sit on benches. And drunken, rowdy 20-somethings pile into bars to bop their heads to the sound of their favorite band.This eclectic mix of visitors and locals is nothing new to Annapolis. Yet, walking down Main Street, a passerby can catch a glimmer of something new emanating from the bars. Music. Foot-thumping, gut-jerking, distinctively original music.Barely five years ago, Annapolis was known as a place to hear cover bands running through the usual play list from "Brown-Eyed Girl" to "Margaritaville."
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
Not so long ago, if you owned a guitar and wrote your own songs your chances of ending up in a studio, recording your very own album, were about as likely as being struck by lightning while cashing a winning lottery ticket on the way to pick up your Nobel prize.But good news, guitar players! Your odds have dramatically improved. All you need now is your guitar, your songs and some spare time.Oh, and be sure to bring your checkbook.For in the same tradition as would-be Great American Novelists who dip into the rent money to pay a vanity publisher to print their tome, guitar-toting dreamers by the stage-full are no longer waiting to be discovered: They're laying out big bucks -- upward of $10,000 in some cases -- to record their own albums.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 9, 1991
Look out, Mick Jagger -- your newest competition could be . . . a bunch of turtles and a plastic fashion doll.That's right -- Barbie is coming out with an album next week. And the newest hot group isn't INXS, it's TMNT. (That's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to the unhip or the grown-up.)When the Turtles appear live at the Baltimore Arena beginning tonight, complete suspension of disbelief is the name of the game: The producers of the show want audiences to believe that Michaelangelo's playing lead guitar and Raphael is wailin' on the sax.And that's with only three reptilian fingers on each turtle limb.
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