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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Label 56, the Baltimore-based record label that released music by End Apathy - the band fronted by alleged Sikh temple shooter Wade Michael Page - released a statement Monday afternoon, regarding Page's relationship with the label. It reads: Label 56 is very sorry to hear about the tragedy in Wisconsin and our thoughts are with the families and friends of those who are affected. We have worked hard over the years to promote a positive image and have posted many articles encouraging people to take a positive path in life, to abstain from drugs, alcohol, and just general behavior that can affect ones life negatively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
If you're in need of a jolt and your Friday morning coffee isn't doing the trick, watch this video for Ed Schrader's Music Beat's song "Radio Eyes. " The song comes from "Sub Pop 1000," the Record Store Day compilation from the famous Seattle record label. There are still a few copies available here . Not much to say here other than this song rips, and the video (directed by Philip Leaman and Zoie Omega) is appropriately silly and fun. Schrader might perform it on Saturday when he joins the Dan Deacon Ensemble, Snails, Moss of Aura and Alle Alle for a show at Current Space.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
The Rev. William Smith Jr., a well-known Baltimore church organist who established the Christian record label Ice Music Group and founded two choirs and a church, died March 1 of cancer at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Windsor Mill resident was 53. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Park Heights neighborhood. He was a 1974 City College graduate and attended Towson University and the Peabody Conservatory. He was a graduate of the Living Word Bible College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
In the mid- to late-1990s, Scottish singer Shirley Manson and her Wisconsin-based band Garbage were alt-rock darlings, MTV rotation regulars, platinum chart-toppers and a band that had little problem selling out headlining tours. The rush of success that came with two massively popular albums - 1995's self-titled debut (featuring "Stupid Girl") and 1998's follow-up "Version 2.0" (featuring "I Think I'm Paranoid") - raised the band's profile and the expectations of Garbage's record label, Interscope.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
Cash from Baltimore's drug trade helped bankroll a rising New York record label that is now at the center of a federal money-laundering investigation and a heated war of words between some of rap's biggest stars, newly filed court records allege. The probe by authorities in New York casts the well-worn drug path to Baltimore as a trade route that provided start-up funds for music company Murder Inc. and portrays the label behind the careers of performers Ashanti and Ja Rule as secretly run by a convicted drug lord currently jailed in Maryland on a federal gun crime.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
A Tarot card might have foretold that Ellwood "Bunky" Bartlett would win $32.6 million in the 2007 lottery. Unfortunately, the spirit world provided no omens that might have helped the 45-year-old practicing Wiccan better manage his good fortune. This week, as much of the East Coast is waiting for the winners of the record $656 million jackpot to step forward, Bartlett of Westminster agreed to talk about the things that have gone wrong - and right - in his life during the past three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | November 13, 2008
Lately, an affected retro soul sound has garnered platinum sales and Grammy Awards for British acts such as Duffy and Amy Winehouse. But Marc Broussard, a boyish-faced Louisiana native, manages to add an emotional depth to his approach, giving his throwback soul an inviting immediacy and a lived-in feel. His voice is warm and rugged, slightly frayed around the edges. It's a sound that belies his 26 years. It's also a sound that has garnered critical kudos, if not big sales. Broussard imbues his soul-pop hybrid with a blues-suffused richness seldom heard in modern pop. Keep Coming Back, his new album and debut for Atlantic Records, sounds as if it could have been recorded in Muscle Shoals, Ala., circa 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Every spring, indie bands head to Austin, Texas, in droves for the South by Southwest Music and Media Conference. So do the industry folks. The festival, which turns 25 this year, is considered the end-all, be-all for up-and-coming bands. Thousands of acts turn up to test their mettle in front of even more critics, label folks and fans. A good string of performances could push a band into the national spotlight; one bad show can be enough to send them home, tail between legs. This year, several Baltimore bands are entering the fray — most making repeat showings, playing highbrow showcases and fringe spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 16, 2007
Blues man Eric Lindell remembers quitting his job and taking up a full-time career in music. Back in 1994, he was living in Sonoma County, Calif., working at a bakery and gigging by night. It was a scary switch, he said. "It really is some deep water out there," said Lindell, 38. "It's a fine line to walk, too ... to get out there and hustle some original music." For years, Lindell scraped out a living on the road, playing as much as possible and recording and releasing albums independently.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
If you're in need of a jolt and your Friday morning coffee isn't doing the trick, watch this video for Ed Schrader's Music Beat's song "Radio Eyes. " The song comes from "Sub Pop 1000," the Record Store Day compilation from the famous Seattle record label. There are still a few copies available here . Not much to say here other than this song rips, and the video (directed by Philip Leaman and Zoie Omega) is appropriately silly and fun. Schrader might perform it on Saturday when he joins the Dan Deacon Ensemble, Snails, Moss of Aura and Alle Alle for a show at Current Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Clare Fischer, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Three years ago, pop punks All Time Low thought they were about to make it big. Riding the coattails of their successful studio album "Nothing Personal," which debuted in July 2009, they had just signed to major label Interscope Records. Finally, with a well-known label, they could break into mainstream radio and grow their fan base. Now, they know better. The only album they released through Interscope, "Dirty Work," was received by much of their longstanding fan base as too glossy and tongue-in-cheek, and sales were far lower than expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Label 56, the Baltimore-based record label that released music by End Apathy - the band fronted by alleged Sikh temple shooter Wade Michael Page - released a statement Monday afternoon, regarding Page's relationship with the label. It reads: Label 56 is very sorry to hear about the tragedy in Wisconsin and our thoughts are with the families and friends of those who are affected. We have worked hard over the years to promote a positive image and have posted many articles encouraging people to take a positive path in life, to abstain from drugs, alcohol, and just general behavior that can affect ones life negatively.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
A Tarot card might have foretold that Ellwood "Bunky" Bartlett would win $32.6 million in the 2007 lottery. Unfortunately, the spirit world provided no omens that might have helped the 45-year-old practicing Wiccan better manage his good fortune. This week, as much of the East Coast is waiting for the winners of the record $656 million jackpot to step forward, Bartlett of Westminster agreed to talk about the things that have gone wrong - and right - in his life during the past three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Every spring, indie bands head to Austin, Texas, in droves for the South by Southwest Music and Media Conference. So do the industry folks. The festival, which turns 25 this year, is considered the end-all, be-all for up-and-coming bands. Thousands of acts turn up to test their mettle in front of even more critics, label folks and fans. A good string of performances could push a band into the national spotlight; one bad show can be enough to send them home, tail between legs. This year, several Baltimore bands are entering the fray — most making repeat showings, playing highbrow showcases and fringe spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
In the early 1990s, a teenage punk fan named Damian Kulash wanted to release a compilation CD of songs from his favorite Washington bands. But Kulash, a Washington native and disciple of the city's DIY movement, needed cash to fund the project. He went to Dischord Records founder Ian MacKaye, the figurehead of the Washington punk scene, and asked for a loan. MacKaye agreed to give Kulash $2,000 — but not before laying a guilt trip on the kid. "He said, 'If you don't pay back this money, I won't have it to lend to somebody else, and you will singlehandedly be the person who shut down the D.C. scene.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
The Rev. William Smith Jr., a well-known Baltimore church organist who established the Christian record label Ice Music Group and founded two choirs and a church, died March 1 of cancer at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Windsor Mill resident was 53. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Park Heights neighborhood. He was a 1974 City College graduate and attended Towson University and the Peabody Conservatory. He was a graduate of the Living Word Bible College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
Reviewing concerts has always been second nature for Greg Szeto - even if no one read his work. In college, Szeto would see shows and habitually scribble down his thoughts on whatever was on hand, including note pads and paper napkins. But he wanted to showcase his comments, concert reviews and random remarks on music. "I wanted an outlet that was more visible and structured, so I could focus and channel those thoughts into something more interesting," he said. Two years ago, Szeto, a 27-year-old who lives downtown, found that online when he started the music blog Aural States (auralstates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 12, 2004
If you've been following her recording career for the last 15 years or attended any of her shows in that time, then you won't be surprised by Regina Belle's new musical transition. In the '80s and '90s, the New Jersey native climbed the charts with such mellifluous urban-pop numbers as "Baby Come to Me," "Make It Like It Was" and "A Whole New World," the Grammy-winning duet with Peabo Bryson from the 1995 Disney film Aladdin. But on her new album, the elegant Lazy Afternoon, Belle pushes her jazz roots to the top, injecting new life into Broadway show tunes and standards made famous by Barbra Streisand, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
Reviewing concerts has always been second nature for Greg Szeto - even if no one read his work. In college, Szeto would see shows and habitually scribble down his thoughts on whatever was on hand, including note pads and paper napkins. But he wanted to showcase his comments, concert reviews and random remarks on music. "I wanted an outlet that was more visible and structured, so I could focus and channel those thoughts into something more interesting," he said. Two years ago, Szeto, a 27-year-old who lives downtown, found that online when he started the music blog Aural States (auralstates.
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