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Reconstructive Surgery

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 15, 2012
Johns Hopkins doctors have received approval from the university's institutional review board to begin doing face transplant surgeries, becoming the second hospital in Baltimore to offer the complex procedure. There have been only 22 such operations around the world, including the most extensive one ever performed earlier this year at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Read details in this Baltimore Sun story . The procedures now can include not only tissue but underlying bones from a donor.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Dylan Bundy was the first Saturday night to say he still has work to do before he legitimately can be considered an option for the Orioles' major league club. Making his second rehabilitation start for short-season Single-A Aberdeen, the club's top prospect, working his way back from reconstructive elbow surgery a year ago, was dominant Saturday during a 3-1 loss in 11 innings. He threw five scoreless innings and allowed just two hits against Brooklyn, recording nine strikeouts, including five of the first six batters he faced.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 2008
Breast cancer patients who had reconstructive surgery using implants immediately after mastectomies were twice as likely to develop infections as women who immediately had breast reconstruction using their own tissue, according to a study published yesterday. The article in Archives of Surgery, which examined the medical records of breast surgery patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis from mid-1999 to mid-2002, found that 50 of 949 patients got an infection at the surgical site within a year after surgery.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
While the Orioles had hoped that third baseman Manny Machado could avoid offseason surgery on his left knee, it became obvious to the club since the season ended that a non-surgical recovery could result in a greater chance of Machado injuring the knee again. That resulted in the decision, announced Thursday night by the team , for Machado to undergo reconstructive surgery to repair a torn medial patellofemoral ligament in his left knee on Monday. The estimated recovery time for the surgery is four to six months.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
The simple fix for dog owners' passionate outrage over the Maryland Court of Appeals' ruling that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous" is to pass a law classifying all dogs that way ("Pit bull fight may stretch into dog days of summer," May 31). No longer should any owner, no matter what breed or mix their dog, get one free attack or bite before the animal is considered dangerous. After all, courts do not give people one free attack on someone before declaring them dangerous. As Dan Rodricks ' commentary noted, there are approximately 4.7 million people bitten by dogs each year, resulting in 29,000 reconstructive procedures.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 1, 2012
Forgive my absence from these pages, but I recently suffered a dislocated fracture of my ankle while saving a kitten from a speeding car. The bad news is, it required reconstructive surgery and I have to spend the next six weeks on my butt. The good news is, Christina Applegate will be playing me in the Hallmark made-for-TV movie about my heroic self-sacrifice. There is nothing like a broken ankle to help you realize that just about everyone you know has had one. And, like the doctor said after asking me how it happened, broken ankles are boring, but the stories behind them never are. Hence the kitten tale, which I made up. The truth is I slipped on the kitchen floor, but that is too boring to repeat.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
Cosmetic surgery might look easy and danger-free on television programs. It might be readily available through the nearest doctor's office. But it is still surgery, and surgery carries risk. "On television, people are always having extreme makeovers," said Dr. David Song, chief of plastic surgery at University of Chicago Hospitals. "People don't understand it's real surgery with real risks." On top of that, cosmetic procedures are a lucrative fee-for-service business. Insurance typically does not cover them, except for reconstructive surgery, so people pay cash if they want their face lifted or tummy tucked.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
It was April Fools' Day 1992, during a scholarly trip to California, when Walters Art Gallery curator Joaneath Spicer learned her breast cancer had recurred. She hung up the phone in a daze. "I remember going in the bathroon. And it's very satisfying to see that there is no sign -- to see that you are yourself."Over the next month as she prepared for a mastectomy, the promise of breast reconstruction helped Dr. Spicer preserve her belief that life would one day return to normal.Unlike many women facing the same choice, the curator was not deterred by ambivalence about whether breast reconstruction is a matter of sanity or vanity -- a debate that threatens to influence insurance coverage.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Dylan Bundy was the first Saturday night to say he still has work to do before he legitimately can be considered an option for the Orioles' major league club. Making his second rehabilitation start for short-season Single-A Aberdeen, the club's top prospect, working his way back from reconstructive elbow surgery a year ago, was dominant Saturday during a 3-1 loss in 11 innings. He threw five scoreless innings and allowed just two hits against Brooklyn, recording nine strikeouts, including five of the first six batters he faced.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
While the Orioles had hoped that third baseman Manny Machado could avoid offseason surgery on his left knee, it became obvious to the club since the season ended that a non-surgical recovery could result in a greater chance of Machado injuring the knee again. That resulted in the decision, announced Thursday night by the team , for Machado to undergo reconstructive surgery to repair a torn medial patellofemoral ligament in his left knee on Monday. The estimated recovery time for the surgery is four to six months.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 15, 2012
Johns Hopkins doctors have received approval from the university's institutional review board to begin doing face transplant surgeries, becoming the second hospital in Baltimore to offer the complex procedure. There have been only 22 such operations around the world, including the most extensive one ever performed earlier this year at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Read details in this Baltimore Sun story . The procedures now can include not only tissue but underlying bones from a donor.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
The simple fix for dog owners' passionate outrage over the Maryland Court of Appeals' ruling that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous" is to pass a law classifying all dogs that way ("Pit bull fight may stretch into dog days of summer," May 31). No longer should any owner, no matter what breed or mix their dog, get one free attack or bite before the animal is considered dangerous. After all, courts do not give people one free attack on someone before declaring them dangerous. As Dan Rodricks ' commentary noted, there are approximately 4.7 million people bitten by dogs each year, resulting in 29,000 reconstructive procedures.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 1, 2012
Forgive my absence from these pages, but I recently suffered a dislocated fracture of my ankle while saving a kitten from a speeding car. The bad news is, it required reconstructive surgery and I have to spend the next six weeks on my butt. The good news is, Christina Applegate will be playing me in the Hallmark made-for-TV movie about my heroic self-sacrifice. There is nothing like a broken ankle to help you realize that just about everyone you know has had one. And, like the doctor said after asking me how it happened, broken ankles are boring, but the stories behind them never are. Hence the kitten tale, which I made up. The truth is I slipped on the kitchen floor, but that is too boring to repeat.
HEALTH
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Sarita Murray looks younger than her 44 years. She greeted visitors to her Northwest Baltimore home on a recent afternoon wearing a short black tutu, oversized pearls around her neck and a fitted white T-shirt bearing an image of a woman's eye made up in shimmery pink shades, much like Murray's on this day. The eye is the logo for her breast cancer awareness group, Blink Pink, launched a year ago. Stacked boxes of pink confetti competed...
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | May 23, 2009
WASHINGTON - Maryland senators are seeking more than $1.4 billion this year in earmarked federal spending for hundreds of special-interest projects, according to first-ever public disclosure reports. Big-ticket items on the senators' wish lists include the Chesapeake Bay, transportation and government construction projects. The Democrats also want to steer more than $170 million combined to private defense contractors. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin has filed requests totaling $1.14 billion, and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is asking for $942.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 2008
Breast cancer patients who had reconstructive surgery using implants immediately after mastectomies were twice as likely to develop infections as women who immediately had breast reconstruction using their own tissue, according to a study published yesterday. The article in Archives of Surgery, which examined the medical records of breast surgery patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis from mid-1999 to mid-2002, found that 50 of 949 patients got an infection at the surgical site within a year after surgery.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
Elisabeth Reed, a writer in Santa Fe, N.M., is an attractive 59-year-old who looks perhaps a decade younger. This, she believes, is because she never smoked, eats well and plays tennis regularly. Oh yes, there's one other possible explanation. Five years ago, she had a face-lift. "Someone showed me a picture of myself, and I saw a little droop in my neck that I'd had since I was 28. I thought it was high time to get rid of it," she explained. "What I hadn't realized, though, is that there are politics involved in cosmetic surgery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Dr. Arthur R. "Auts" Jasion, a surgeon who had been chairman of the plastic and reconstructive surgery section at Franklin Square Hospital Center, died of pneumonia July 3 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 68. He was born Arthur Raymond Jasionowski in Baltimore. He was the grandson of Polish immigrants who moved to Baltimore in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1944, the family changed its name to Jasion. Dr. Jasion was raised in Canton, where his parents owned and operated a grocery store at Lakewood Avenue and Fleet Street, near Patterson Park.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
Cosmetic surgery might look easy and danger-free on television programs. It might be readily available through the nearest doctor's office. But it is still surgery, and surgery carries risk. "On television, people are always having extreme makeovers," said Dr. David Song, chief of plastic surgery at University of Chicago Hospitals. "People don't understand it's real surgery with real risks." On top of that, cosmetic procedures are a lucrative fee-for-service business. Insurance typically does not cover them, except for reconstructive surgery, so people pay cash if they want their face lifted or tummy tucked.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
Elisabeth Reed, a writer in Santa Fe, N.M., is an attractive 59-year-old who looks perhaps a decade younger. This, she believes, is because she never smoked, eats well and plays tennis regularly. Oh yes, there's one other possible explanation. Five years ago, she had a face-lift. "Someone showed me a picture of myself, and I saw a little droop in my neck that I'd had since I was 28. I thought it was high time to get rid of it," she explained. "What I hadn't realized, though, is that there are politics involved in cosmetic surgery.
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