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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Dr. Arthur R. "Auts" Jasion, a surgeon who had been chairman of the plastic and reconstructive surgery section at Franklin Square Hospital Center, died of pneumonia July 3 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 68. He was born Arthur Raymond Jasionowski in Baltimore. He was the grandson of Polish immigrants who moved to Baltimore in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1944, the family changed its name to Jasion. Dr. Jasion was raised in Canton, where his parents owned and operated a grocery store at Lakewood Avenue and Fleet Street, near Patterson Park.
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HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
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SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Tim Wittman, the Spirit's No. 2 scorer and most versatile player, will undergo reconstructive surgery on his right knee and miss the rest of the season.The extent of Wittman's injury, suffered during Sunday's win overthe Cleveland Crunch, was determined by a magnetic resonance imaging test at Union Memorial Hospital. He has a torn anterior cruciate ligament.Dr. Les Matthews will do an arthroscopic exploratory exam tomorrow and then perform major reconstructive surgery in about three weeks.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
City officials promised to cover the financial costs to the Charles Village residents displaced by the collapse of East 26th Street, and that tab now sits just shy of $100,000, city officials said Thursday. It will continue to grow, as well, even though the residents are back in their homes. The costs — mostly for hotel rooms for the residents of the 19 homes that were evacuated — are in addition to the city's $18.5 million estimate for the street's reconstruction, said Caron Brace, a spokeswoman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, whose office released the figures.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
The twin who survived a marathon surgical separation from her sister last week was back in the operating room yesterday for several hours of reconstructive surgery on her head and scalp. During the seven-hour procedure, surgeons at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center patched an opening in 13- month-old Lea Block's dura mater - the fibrous outer covering of the brain - and closed a hole in the soft tissue above it using skin from the back of her head. Surgeons were unable to do the planned reconstruction during the separation surgery because of complications largely involving her sister, Tabea, who died in the operating room after suffering a cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
Patients with severe leg injuries fare equally well - or poorly - whether they have reconstructive surgery or lose their damaged limbs to amputation, says a study published today. The sobering truth, said doctors in Baltimore and elsewhere, is that 40 percent of patients remain severely disabled two years after their injuries, and half do not return to work, no matter which route they take. "If you have reconstruction, you're going to have more surgery, more hospitalizations and are at risk for complications of those surgeries," said Dr. Alan L. Jones, chief of orthopedic surgery at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Hilary Waldman and Hilary Waldman,The Hartford Courant | May 30, 2004
Cancer patients often leap two gigantic hurdles in the race against disease. First comes treatment to stay alive. Next is life after treatment. And for patients such as Sandra Smith, who lost most of her jaw and the floor of her mouth to oral cancer, living now includes smiling, speaking clearly and chewing tender meat with replacement parts that move and function almost as well as the originals. Smith and about 6 million other people across the United States are beneficiaries of advances in reconstructive surgery that some doctors say they could not have imagined 10 years ago. The ability to create Smith's new, living jawbone; to rebuild breasts without destroying abdominal muscles; and to restore function to limbs or fingers damaged by accident hinges on the relatively newfound ability of doctors to stitch together veins and arteries whose diameters are about the size of the tip of a ballpoint pen. "Reconstructive surgery has never been more exciting," said Dr. Allen Van Beek, a Minnesota plastic and reconstructive surgeon and president of the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation, an arm of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
SPORTS
March 9, 1992
Baseball Philadelphia Phillies -- Announced that P Ken Howell will undergo reconstructive surgery on April 1 to tighten his shoulder muscles and will be out for at least a year.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 11, 1995
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Dr. James Andrews re-examined the right knee of Orioles outfielder Jeffrey Hammonds yesterday, and cleared him to practice whatever he needs to do to get ready for the season.Hammonds, who had reconstructive surgery on the joint last October, must continue wearing a knee brace for the next three weeks.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
UNIONDALE, N.Y. -- Defenseman Darius Kasparaitis, out at least four more weeks after reconstructive knee surgery, signed a three-year deal believed to be worth a little more than $1 million per season with bonuses factored in.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Richard C. "Dick" Schneider, a retired construction manager and railroad buff, died Aug. 7 of cancer at Hospice and Community Care of Mount Joy, Pa. He was 67. The son of a Defense Department worker and a registered nurse, Richard Carl Schneider was born in Ridley Park, Pa., and raised in Friedensburg, Pa., where he graduated in 1964 from Blue Mountain High School. He attended Pennsylvania State University for three years before beginning a more than 40-year career in heavy highway construction.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Federal investigators on Thursday reconstructed the scene of this week's collision between a CSX cargo train and a truck, hoping to piece together more information on the derailment and explosion that rocked businesses and homes in the Rosedale area. Crews with the National Transportation Safety Board plan to stay in Baltimore County for several more days before heading back to their headquarters in Washington to continue their probe of Tuesday's crash, according to board member Robert Sumwalt.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
A Sun front-page headline has never before caused me to catch my breath in astonishment, but "Closing the door on history: Budget squeeze threatens upkeep, renovation of aging Md. buildings owned by the U.S. " (Feb. 9) finally did. Is there a "budget squeeze" at federally owned historic sites in Maryland? If so, what have all the weeks and months of construction at the Hampton National Historic Site been about? Close observation of the site as well as a neighbor of 50 years attest to the fact that the Hampton site is well cared for and that the current costly changes are detracting from the site rather than enhancing or preserving it. Removing deep-seated granite to re-locate a road by jack-hammering it for weeks cannot be for historic preservation.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
The Maryland House Travel Plaza on I-95 near Aberdeen will close for reconstruction on Sept. 15 for at least a year, the Maryland Transportation Authority said Thursday. When the Maryland House closes at midnight on Saturday, Sept. 15, the Chesapeake House Travel Plaza near North East in Cecil County will remain open for business, with a full complement of new food concepts opening in phases through early October, MDTA said in a news release. Food service, however, will be limited the week of Sept.
NEWS
Patrick Maynard | July 25, 2012
A multi-month session of earthquake-related repairs to Baltimore's Basilca of the Assumption will start next week, after being delayed from its original start date, a representative for the Archdiocese of Baltimore wrote in an email on Wednesday. "The repairs to the 200-year-old structure will not begin until August 1.," wrote Sean Caine, referring to a series of fixes that are budgeted to cost $3-5 million. "At that time the Basilica will be open for Masses and tours with access restricted to the undercroft -- where Masses will take place [Mondays through Fridays]
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
The ramp from northbound I-83 to the inner loop of the Baltimore Beltway closed Thursday afternoon to reconstruct Wednesday's fatal accident that claimed the life of a 5-year-old boy but has reopened, authorities say. The accident occurred about 3 p.m. Wednesday when a sport utility vehicle rear-ended a sedan occupied by a man, his wife and their two children. A 9-year-old girl suffered a broken leg and remains hospitalized along her parents. Their son, Jake Owen, was killed in the crash.
NEWS
December 24, 2001
Columbia Bank names Dilworth vice president John L. Dilworth has been named vice president of acquisition, development and construction lending at Columbia Bank, a commercial bank with headquarters in Howard County. Dilworth will work with builders and developers in the Baltimore-Washington area. He had been a vice president at SunTrust Bank. ENTAA's Kleiman appointed to committees Dr. Lee Kleiman, a partner in ENTAA Care and director of the practice's facial plastic surgery division, has been appointed to the Craniofacial Reconstructive Surgery Committee and the New Technology Committee of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
SPORTS
December 17, 1994
Maryland guard Kelley Gibson, considered one of the top women's basketball recruits in the country this season, will undergo season-ending knee surgery in January.Gibson, who will be redshirted, tore her anterior cruciate ligament in the Terps' third game, Nov. 30. She will have reconstructive surgery, followed by six to nine months of rehabilitation.The Terps (5-2) play their next game at Loyola on Thursday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
She started drawing caricatures of cops, funny pictures of her colleagues at the Essex precinct, as a break from investigating street robberies. Then someone noticed, "Oh, you can draw. " Soon after, Detective Evelyn Grant turned her talent to drawing suspected holdup men and other criminals as a police sketch artist. Now she's trying something more challenging - reconstructing faces, either in drawings or clay busts, by examining a skull. She joined the Baltimore County Police Department as a cadet at 18 and became a sworn officer in 2002.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The doors of Baltimore's new Union Station, now Pennsylvania Station, swung open a century ago this week to welcome enthusiastic crowds of Baltimoreans, travelers and gawkers alike. Its completion was considered a great civic triumph after years of agitation from Baltimoreans, both prominent and humble, and newspapers calling for a new station that was worthy of the city. The present station, the third on the site, was constructed of granite, terra cotta and built on a structural steel frame.
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