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Reconciliation

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NEWS
March 7, 2010
The present functioning of the Democrat-controlled Congress concerning health care reform points to the inherent dangers of the unlimited power of its majority upon our republic. The ensuing consequences of the tyranny of a majority thwarting the will of the people were most feared by both Jefferson and de Tocqueville. They thought it to be an impious and detestable act for a legislative majority to use their authority of absolute power to pass laws they considered just but their constituents considered unjust.
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NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 4, 1992
Washington. -- After years of swimming against a cold tide of Jewish rage and resentment, Jesse Jackson appears to be moving toward the warm waters of reconciliation.Both sides want it. Mr. Jackson may not speak for all African-Americans, but he is respected enough that harmony between him and prominent Jewish leaders would calm much of the growing tension between African-Americans and American Jews.But the road to reconciliation between these important historical allies is bumpy and blocked by historical debris, including, I believe, historical differences in the importance each group puts on words and deeds.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 6, 2014
A plea for about a dozen people who know who they are: Will you see "12 Years a Slave" now? It just won the Oscar for Best Picture. It just came out on DVD. Please see it. I'll even spring for the popcorn. You see, I keep encountering folks, mostly African-American, who have decided that they won't -- or can't -- see this movie. Some say they don't want to be made angry. Others say they don't want to be traumatized. I don't blame them for respecting the power of this film.
NEWS
By Anthony H. Cordesman | December 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The principal recommendations of the Iraq Study Group are very unlikely to produce success. The report recognizes that the situation in Iraq is deteriorating and that the current strategy is unworkable - but then, so does virtually everyone else. The key problem is that events may be spiraling out of control, and the key to success is not outside action but Iraqi action. As a result, the most important single sentence in the Iraq Study Group's executive summary is its introductory caveat - "if the Iraqi government moves forward with national reconciliation."
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | April 20, 2005
It is not the most remembered contest in boxing, let alone American sports. But if you were a teen in New York City in the early 1960s, where Friday night fights were as big as Monday Night Football is today, you'd probably remember the historic March 24, 1962, world championship bout between Emile Griffith and Benny "The Kid" Paret. The televised match at Madison Square Garden would decide once and for all a rivalry between the two welterweights, who split two earlier bouts. In the 12th round, Griffith let loose with a barrage of head shots and Paret slumped against the ropes, lapsing into a coma.
NEWS
October 17, 1995
ONE MAY QUIBBLE with President Clinton's tactics in going to Texas to speak about the racial divide in the hearts and minds of Americans, black and white, on the same day hundreds of thousands of African American men assembled on The Mall in Washington. His address might have had more impact had it come the day before or the day after the Million Man March. But tactics aside, Mr. Clinton's willingness to speak out frankly on the most searing issue in the whole American experience was exemplary.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, looking ahead to his second inaugural, called yesterday for a new "spirit of reconciliation" in Washington and across the country.The nation's continued progress is at stake, he said, as is its place in the world through the next century."How can we prove in America that we can all get along -- without giving up our basic beliefs but in finding a ground of mutual respect?" the president asked about 100 national religious leaders at the White House. "It seems to me that may be the single most significant decision facing the United States."
NEWS
August 27, 1996
SOUTH AFRICA set one model for a traumatized nation coming to terms with its past in its Commission of Truth and Reconciliation. South Korea has set the opposite, in the trials of two ex-presidents, military officers and titans of industry. One seeks reconciliation, the other justice. It is a terrible choice for a nation to have to make.Former President Chun Doo Hwan was sentenced to death for masterminding the 1979 coup and massacre of 200 demonstrators; former president Roh Tae-woo received 22 1/2 years; 13 other officers received prison terms; eight of Korea's biggest tycoons were sentenced to prison for bribing Roh.This is an incredible downfall for the strong men who accommodated the restoration of democracy with the election of President Kim Young-sam.
NEWS
By LIZ SLY and LIZ SLY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 13, 2005
BAGHDAD, IRAQ -- U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan arrived unexpectedly in Iraq on his first visit since the invasion, calling for national reconciliation in the country. Meanwhile, a Baathist Web site that had earlier reported the death of Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, the most senior Baathist leader still on the run, apologized yesterday and said that he was, in fact, still alive. Annan referred to the need to curb violence - both in Iraq and neighboring Jordan, where suicide bombings Wednesday killed at least 57 people in three hotels in the capital, Amman.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
I was touched but also troubled by Lisa Akchin's recent commentary on racial reconciliation ( "Moving from fear to friendliness," July 25). She comments on her own reflexive fear in the past of acknowledging black men on the street, and from her own experience touches on ways to improve race relations in these troubled times. She writes also of the great need for social bridge building and details our loss, because of the myriad ways to avoid honestly confronting racial issues, of the capacity for public friendliness in our daily lives.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
There have been a number of hopeful signs recently regarding the public's recognition of the value of reaching beyond partisan disagreement ("Nostalgia for the age of statesmen," Oct. 23). One comes from "the greatest generation," the other from a college student. The first was a commentary in The Washington Post by former senator and Republican presidential candidate Robert Dole, who wrote movingly of the late Democratic Sen. George McGovern as "the man who never gave up. " Mr. McGovern and Mr. Dole shared the experience of battlefield service during World War II, but they disagreed sharply over the wisdom of the Vietnam War. Yet they both believed in acting to meet human needs as members of the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, where they worked together to expand domestic school lunch programs and reduce international poverty and hunger.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict underwent another evolution this week when the Fatah-backed Palestinian National Authority, which controls the West Bank, and Hamas, the radical Islamic movement that rules the Gaza Strip, announced they would put aside their differences to make common cause for an independent Palestinian state. Whether the two groups can really end years of mutual enmity and distrust remains to be seen, but the mere fact that they are talking about cooperating again could spell trouble for U.S. diplomacy in the region.
NEWS
March 7, 2010
The present functioning of the Democrat-controlled Congress concerning health care reform points to the inherent dangers of the unlimited power of its majority upon our republic. The ensuing consequences of the tyranny of a majority thwarting the will of the people were most feared by both Jefferson and de Tocqueville. They thought it to be an impious and detestable act for a legislative majority to use their authority of absolute power to pass laws they considered just but their constituents considered unjust.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 2008
BAGHDAD -- During a surprise visit here yesterday, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice praised Iraqi leaders for making progress on several key goals of the troop buildup, including the approval of a controversial new de-Baathification law. Speaking alongside Iraq's foreign minister, Hoshyar Zebari, inside the Green Zone, Rice praised the passage of the law, which is intended to undermine the Sunni Arab-led insurgency and to draw more Sunnis into the...
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | December 25, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Now that the security situation has improved in Baghdad, everyone here is wondering if the dismal political situation can improve, too. The goal of the U.S. military "surge" was to create a more secure atmosphere that would enable Iraqi political leaders to figure out how to reconcile. Indeed, a political "surge" is badly needed. It is the ticket to creating a viable Iraqi army, and to stabilizing the country. That, in turn, is the key to drawing down U.S. troops. After two weeks in Iraq, I can report that the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is as dysfunctional as ever, the prime minister's staff a collection of incompetents from his Shiite Dawa Party who are criticized by many in his own government.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | April 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- In the latest warning from Washington that America's patience is wearing thin, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates told Iraqi government officials yesterday that they need to pass legislation aimed at easing sectarian tension before the U.S. military conducts a formal evaluation of its current troop increase in Iraq this summer. Gates stopped short of announcing an outright deadline, but he used some of his most forthright language to date to make clear to the Iraqi government that American soldiers would not remain on Baghdad streets indefinitely.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 2001
CHRISTIANA, Pa. - On a map, this small, nondescript town of 400 families, surrounded on all sides by Amish farm country, is hard to find. Yet banners on Christiana telephone poles wave proudly "Freedom Began Here!" And famous abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass once wrote, "The battle for liberty began in Christiana." It was here 150 years ago today that one of the most violent confrontations over slavery in antebellum America took place: the Christiana Riot, where a Baltimore County slaveowner in pursuit of his runaway slaves was killed, his body pelted with bullets and hacked with corn knives.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 3, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Top U.S. diplomatic and military officials urged Iraq's lawmakers yesterday to speed up political progress, a sign of Washington's concern that security gains could be squandered amid legislative infighting. The comments were reminiscent of those heard repeatedly last spring and summer as pressure mounted on Iraq's parliament to pass legislation considered crucial to fostering national reconciliation. Also reminiscent was the political discord in parliament. Now, as before, lawmakers are divided into sectarian blocs, and boycotts and walkouts continue to hamper movement on major bills.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2007
Baghdad -- As Iraq's government trumpeted yesterday a dramatic decline in violence, describing it as a sign that sectarian warfare is waning, U.S. officials warned that the gains will be short-lived if the nation's leaders do not use the relative calm to advance political reconciliation. Also yesterday, Iraqi officials arrested 43 people, including two Americans, after guards protecting a convoy injured a woman, setting the stage for a showdown over foreign security companies' immunity from prosecution here.
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