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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | August 23, 2012
State health officials have revised recommendations for hospitals after receiving nearly 130 comments on an initital draft on the issue. In an effort to improve breastfeeding rates The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is working to make hospitals stronger players in promoting the practice. Studies have found breast milk is the best food for infants. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends babies receive nothing but breast milk for the first six months of life and that breast milk is supplemented with food until the baby is at least one-year-old.
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FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
No parent wants to be in a position to use it, but child-safety experts agree that learning infant and child CPR is a must for every mother and father. "It's one skill that just doesn't come naturally to caregivers. It's a learned technique," says Lanny Dowell, Greater Baltimore Medical Center's parent education and doula coordinator. Courses are offered by many local hospitals and through the American Red Cross. First aid for choking is also taught in CPR classes. And some are combined with training on using defibrillators or with adult CPR. While parents can watch a video for instruction, it's helpful to practice on a mannequin, experts say. "Most people learn by doing," says Sarah Sherman, training center coordinator for the American Heart Association at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Maryland should increase its efforts to protect natural resources, reduce waste and promote renewable energy as a way to attract and retain jobs in fast-growing green sectors, according to a report by a governor-appointed task force to be unveiled Wednesday. Recommendations of the Green Jobs & Industry Task Force, part of Gov. Martin O'Malley's initiative to create or retain 100,000 green jobs by 2015, include increasing the state's reliance on wind power and solar energy, improving public transportation and promoting high-density development around transit hubs.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to unveil dozens of recommendations Wednesday intended to lure immigrant families to Baltimore and retain them. The proposals, from increasing the availability of translators at city agencies to making it easier for the undocumented to buy homes, offer insight into the mayor's pledge to attract 10,000 new families over the next decade - an effort that is focused in part on the city's burgeoning immigrant neighborhoods. "I want to make sure that Baltimore isn't behind the curve on this trend," said Rawlings-Blake, who will formally announce the recommendations today.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
A task force charged with strengthening Maryland policies regarding head trauma in student athletes called Tuesday for more staff training, parental notification of concussions and further study of ways to limit such injuries. The state school board voted Tuesday to accept the recommendations and field public comment on them. The majority of the proposals are designed to beef up a set of emergency regulations the board approved in July. Edward Sparks, co-chair of the task force and executive director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, called the group's report "a working document" that was produced after months of research on practices in other school districts across the nation, the Ivy League and the National Football League.
NEWS
August 11, 1997
A Westminster citizens group that has been studying ways to make Uniontown Road safer between Old New Windsor Road and Route 31 is recommending reducing the crest of the hill and adding left turn lanes.Westminster officials plan improvements to Uniontown Road in conjunction with a State Highway Administration project to improve West Main Street from Pennsylvania Avenue to Route 31. The SHA project has been awarded money for design but not construction.Consulting engineer Leon Kriebel presented the citizens group's recommendations to the City Council at its July 28 meeting.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
A number of recent reports have recommended changes in the way Maryland pays for, manages and evaluates school programs. Here is a look those reports:* SONDHEIM COMMISSIONWho: Panel appointed by Governor Schaefer, chaired by long-time adviser Walter Sondheim.What: Studied education reform in the state.When: Reported August, 1989.Recommendations: Proposed a detailed system of reporting school-by-school performance and a school accreditation process as a way of prodding schools to develop improvement plans.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1995
The U.S. Naval Academy's sports program, criticized on Capitol Hill for questionable spending, is headed for greater oversight and control, an academy official said.Admiral Charles R. Larson, the academy's superintendent, is expected to implement the recommendations the Navy Department proposed in its review of the Naval Academy Athletic Association. The private, non-profit group finances Navy athletics."Admiral Larson's intention is to adopt all of the recommendations that went forward if the Congress concurs with the report," said Capt.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In his latest assessment of the military's future, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff has backed away from some of his earlier modest recommendations for reducing duplication in the roles and missions of the services.The changes in the report, "Roles, Missions and Functions of the Armed Forces of the United States," by Gen. Colin L. Powell are a sign of the difficulties President Clinton and Defense Secretary Les Aspin face in realigning the military's roles as the four services try to hang onto their missions at a time of reduced funding.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
Criticized for hyping troubled companies and facing new regulations to encourage their independence, analysts are issuing more recommendations to dump stocks. Even so, some market watchers say there still aren't enough "sell" ratings. Thomson Financial/ First Call in Boston, which tracks analysts' stock ratings at about 200 brokerages, said that at the end of July, 3.4 percent of some 24,000 recommendations were "sells" or "strong sells." That compares with 1.5 percent a year ago, and 0.7 percent in early March 2000, when the market peaked.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Federal environmental officials may be overestimating farm pollution reductions in the Chesapeake Bay, contends a Washington environmental group, which also finds that phosphorus and algae concentrations in rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore have shown no real improvement over the last decade Those are the conclusions of a pair of reports released Monday by the Environmental Integrity Project. State monitoring data showed no reduction in phosphorus levels in eight waterways on the Shore from 2003 to 2013, while concentrations actually worsened in three rivers: the Nanticoke, the Sassafras, and the Transquaking.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools officials on Tuesday pledged to improve communications with Rodgers Forge residents regarding updates and revisions of a controversial proposal to renovate Dumbarton Middle School - a project that involves removal of several historic trees on the property. The $27.5 million plan calls for additions and renovations to make the 58-year-old school compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, bring the interior up to 21st-century standards and improve traffic flow and safety.
NEWS
By Larry R. Faulkner and Donald N. Langenberg | June 25, 2014
Would you trust a surgeon who learned a few tricks in medical school, then spent the first couple of years in the operating room experimenting while he figured out which techniques worked? Of course you wouldn't. But, unfortunately, that's the same level of preparation that too many of our nation's teachers receive before setting foot in the classroom. Last week, the National Council on Teacher Quality released its exhaustive study of what's going on inside America's teaching institutions.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
(UPDATE: The Orioles announced Monday evening that Matt Wieters will undergo Tommy John surgery Tuesday afternoon in Florida. For the updated article, click here .) Yes, the Orioles face another American League East team today, their third of four consecutive series against division foes. But the most important Orioles-related thing happening in Florida today will not be at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. It will occur at a physician's office in Gulf Breeze, Fla., when renowned surgeon Dr. James Andrews re-examines catcher Matt Wieters' strained right elbow.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A task force assigned to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland schools will recommend to Gov. Martin O'Malley that the summer break be extended, a measure that has been embraced by one Eastern Shore school district but opposed by most of the state's superintendents. State officials said that a task force, convened by the Maryland General Assembly last year to study the issue, voted 11-4 this week to recommend that schools open after Labor Day, a move that has been championed by Comptroller Peter Franchot for its economic benefits to local businesses and the state's tourism industry.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 15, 1997
NEW YORK -- The Securities and Exchange Commission is preparing to issue recommendations on what companies that sell asset-backed bonds must tell investors about the offerings.The recommendations, to be issued perhaps by year's end, will address long-standing concerns among investors who say they aren't getting enough information to figure how much to pay for the bonds and how much yield they should get.Even when information is available, some investors say they don't have enough time to examine documents such as the preliminary prospectus, called a red herring.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Howard County Council members plan to take until September before moving to change county zoning laws based on recommendations of a citizens task force. "I think it's going to take someone sitting down with us. I'd like to come back in September," said Councilwoman Mary Kay Sigaty, a west Columbia Democrat who with North Laurel-Savage Democrat Jen Terrasa created the Public Engagement and Land Use Task Force. Terrasa pointed out that many of the 46 recommendations reached this month require use of county technology, which is being modernized.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
The Social Security Administration has failed to establish an adequate process for handling discrimination claims from employees and has sparked concerns about conflicts of interest in some of those cases, according to a scathing federal report obtained Thursday by The Baltimore Sun. Auditors at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, charged with enforcing workplace discrimination laws, said the agency failed to follow regulations when handling...
NEWS
April 16, 2014
In her commentary, Susan Peschin criticizes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for not finding evidence of benefit for screening for dementia as based on sound science ( "Alzheimer's again gets short shrift," April 14). On what else should such a profound public health policy be made? It is interesting she mentions breast cancer , the disease over which we have been fighting the most bitter screening war. For although it makes intuitive sense to screen and catch diseases early, for all our good intentions, the more we learn, the more we are finding that screening has been way oversold in breast cancer and a number of other diseases.
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