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June 17, 2013
The piano students of Susan Liberati, who teaches piano in Forest Hill, recently held their annual piano recital.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A stress injury to a finger has caused pianist Helene Grimaud to cancel performances, including one in Baltimore. She had been scheduled to open the Shriver Hall Concert Series on Sept. 21. Stepping in for Grimaud will be Angela Hewitt, who last appeared on the series in 2012. A noted Bach specialist, Hewitt will perform "The Art of Fugue" (complete) for the Shriver Hall recital, a work she has recently recorded.  
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
His name may not register with concert-goers as quickly as some others, but Nelson Freire is easily recognized as one of the most respected pianists on the world scene. Without a hint of showiness or artificial attitude, Freire invariably brings a sterling technique and stylistic authority to the keyboard, as he did in a recital Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The pianist established at the outset, in the Siloti arrangement of Bach's G minor Organ Prelude, that the tone would be warm and richly colored all night, that the phrasing would speak eloquently.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
  It isn't news that Anthony McGill is a masterful clarinetist, but his recital Sunday evening for Music in the Valley still surprised. The pristine technique, the breadth of tone coloring, the expressive richness of phrasing -- all of these gifts seemed more impressive than ever. The chief take-away from the concert is that the New York Philharmonic is awfully lucky. McGill, who has been co-principal clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade, was just appointed the Philharmonic's principal.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Trumpet recitals are among the rarest of events in the classical music realm. It's just a guess on my part, but I imagine that recitals by female trumpeters have tended to be ever so slightly rarer. Which is to say that Sunday evening's appearance by Tine Thing Helseth for the Shriver Hall Concert Series was extra cool. The Oslo-born trumpeter, joined by an exceptional pianist, Bretton Brown, brought with her a vivid program. There aren't a ton of works originally composed for trumpet and piano.
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By Stephen Wigler | April 25, 1996
Robert Schumann's great suite for piano, "Kreisleriana," takes its inspiration from the weird tales of E.T.A. Hoffman and, like that great writer's fiction, has the lingering impact of a vivid dream."
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A stress injury to a finger has caused pianist Helene Grimaud to cancel performances, including one in Baltimore. She had been scheduled to open the Shriver Hall Concert Series on Sept. 21. Stepping in for Grimaud will be Angela Hewitt, who last appeared on the series in 2012. A noted Bach specialist, Hewitt will perform "The Art of Fugue" (complete) for the Shriver Hall recital, a work she has recently recorded.  
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
  It isn't news that Anthony McGill is a masterful clarinetist, but his recital Sunday evening for Music in the Valley still surprised. The pristine technique, the breadth of tone coloring, the expressive richness of phrasing -- all of these gifts seemed more impressive than ever. The chief take-away from the concert is that the New York Philharmonic is awfully lucky. McGill, who has been co-principal clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade, was just appointed the Philharmonic's principal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 12, 2002
The Baltimore Classical Guitar Society opens its season with a recital by Croatian-born Ana Vidovic, first-prize winner at the 1998 International Francisco Tarrega Competition in Spain and several other competitions. Currently studying at the Peabody Institute, Vidovic also has five CDs behind her and a sizable list of concert credits. Her recital is at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Museum Drive at N. Charles and 31st streets. Tickets are $25. Call 410-247-5320. The season continues in November with an appearance by Hungarian brothers Peter and Zoltan Katona - the Katona Twins Guitar Duo. December will bring the society's popular annual benefit concert featuring the 25-member Baltimore Classical Guitar Orchestra, as well as soloists and smaller ensembles.
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By Tim Smith | October 24, 2002
If the name Pieter Wispelwey doesn't ring a bell, it should - loudly and clearly - after you catch his recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series this weekend. The Dutch cellist has emerged over the past decade or so as an unusually imaginative artist, forever rethinking music of the past and happily, incisively exploring the music of today. Wispelwey will tackle all five of Beethoven's cello sonatas in this visit, accompanied by pianist Dejan Lazic. It's a great opportunity to dig into a major portion of the cello repertoire, with a telling guide leading the way. The sonatas provide effective mileposts for various points in Beethoven's creative life, from his early, new-kid-on-the-block days to his years of anguish over deafness and other personal problems.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
WQXR in New York reports that Anthony McGill, one of the most eloquent clarinetists of our day, will join the New York Philharmonic in September as principal. McGill has been co-principal clarinetist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade and a Peabody Conservatory faculty member since 2008. There is extra interest in the Philharmonic post since McGill is the third musician to be hired since the retirement, after six decades, of Stanley Drucker in 2009. The first two accepted the position, but subsequently changed their minds.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Music in the Great Hall wrapped up its 40th anniversary season Sunday afternoon at Towson Unitarian with two powerhouse artists -- flutist Marina Piccinini and pianist Michael Sheppard.  I could only stay for the first half of their recital (a performance of Rachmaninoff's "Vespers," one of my faves, beckoned at another locale), but it was a decidedly eventful first half. Piccinini, a Peabody Conservatory faculty member with a busy international career, established the sweetness and purity of her tone at the outset in the familiar Minuet and Dance of the Blessed Spirits from Gluck's "Orphee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Trumpet recitals are among the rarest of events in the classical music realm. It's just a guess on my part, but I imagine that recitals by female trumpeters have tended to be ever so slightly rarer. Which is to say that Sunday evening's appearance by Tine Thing Helseth for the Shriver Hall Concert Series was extra cool. The Oslo-born trumpeter, joined by an exceptional pianist, Bretton Brown, brought with her a vivid program. There aren't a ton of works originally composed for trumpet and piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
The more you study Bach, the deeper your admiration becomes. At first, it's the sheer structural ingenuity of the music that startles and engrosses -- all those repeated A/B patterns; the inevitable, incredibly eventful harmonic journeys from tonic to dominant and back again; the complexity and perfection of the contrapuntal dialog. From drinking in Bach's brilliant manipulation of form, it's a small step to being almost overwhelmed by the sense of something downright spiritual permeating the masses of notes, something grand and ennobling.    One of the coolest things about Bach is how all that technical and expressive beauty is as apparent in a work for solo violin as in a large-scale piece for chorus and orchestra.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sunday night's installment of this season's "Downton Abbey" will be most talked about because of what happened below stairs while everyone else was attending a recital by the legendary Dame Nellie Melba. I figured dear old Melba deserved a wee bit more respect than she got at Downton, where, in addition to that dreadful business involving a beloved servant, some of the upper-crusties walked out on the diva to play cards and some others who stayed made snide remarks. Tres déclassé.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
His name may not register with concert-goers as quickly as some others, but Nelson Freire is easily recognized as one of the most respected pianists on the world scene. Without a hint of showiness or artificial attitude, Freire invariably brings a sterling technique and stylistic authority to the keyboard, as he did in a recital Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The pianist established at the outset, in the Siloti arrangement of Bach's G minor Organ Prelude, that the tone would be warm and richly colored all night, that the phrasing would speak eloquently.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1990
Chris Merritt, a leading tenor of Italian bel canto opera, returned to a Baltimore synagogue last night and as the cantor said, brought a fine Hanukkah gift two days early.Merritt sang sweetly and strongly but not only the famous lyrical Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini canon he's making his cornerstone. In a nearly sold-out Beth El Congregation recital, Merritt showed he could be just as effective, and in some cases more emotional, by singing a lovely soft ending as in Henri Duparc's "Soupir" or a pleasant Rossini melody, "La Promessa."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Against the darkened altar of St. Joseph's Monastery Church Sunday, pianist Eckart Heiligers played an exquisite trio of Haydn, Scriabin and Schumann sonatas and a slightly unchurchlike concoction by Heinz Holliger.Seventy people applauded on their feet at recital's end, delighted to have been the first to hear Heiligers since he won the Yale Gordon Concerto Competition two days before at the Peabody Conservatory. They seemed to agree with series organizer Paul Jan Zdunek that Heiligers is somewhat of a "secret treasure' in Baltimore.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
No matter how often officials at the MacArthur Foundation keeps pointing out that they bestow "fellowships," people insist on calling them "genius awards" -- sort of the way people keep saying "Obamacare" instead of "Affordable Health Care Act. "  One reason why the "genius" tag has stuck, of course, is that so many of those receiving these annual pats on the back (at $625,000 a pat) really do seem like geniuses. They're certainly not like you and me. Jeremy Denk, one of the recent 2013 honorees, is a case in point.
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June 24, 2013
The piano students of Patti Griffin recently held their annual recital at Jarrettsville United Methodist Church. Participating were, front row from left, Emma Hunsinger, Aidan Apicella, Alex Coudon, Aiyanna Hawkins and Ryleigh Sullivan; second row, from left: Patti Griffin, Juliette Fell, Maddie Jester, Jessica Stevens, Rachel Waskiewicz and Coby Bracken; back row, from left: Natalie Fell, Ryan Waskiewicz, Anthony Bradley, Julianna Stevens and Paige...
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