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NEWS
By John W. Frece | February 7, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., certain that the public is sick of big government and costly social programs, has developed a budget-cutting plan that would put welfare recipients to work, shrink the state work force and shift Medicaid costs to the federal government, nursing homes and patients themselves.The conservative Kent County delegate said that, as the House leader, he felt obliged to come up with a plan to slow state spending before giving in to growing pressure to raise taxes from other legislative leaders, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and a variety of advocacy groups.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration plans to issue sweeping new rules today that will require states to move much larger numbers of poor people from welfare to work. The rules represent the biggest changes in welfare policy since 1996, when Congress abolished the federal guarantee of cash assistance for the nation's poorest children. Since then, the number of welfare recipients has plunged more than 60 percent, to 4.4 million people from 12.2 million. For the first time, the rules set a uniform definition for permissible work activities and require states to verify and document the number of hours worked by welfare recipients.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to discourage the formation of long-term welfare families, the Clinton administration's welfare-reform task force intends to recommend that teen-agers who qualify for aid be prohibited from receiving it unless they live with a parent or other responsible adult, sources said yesterday.The change is intended to eliminate what some analysts view as an incentive for unmarried young women to have children: the ability to establish their own households with the aid of welfare payments.
NEWS
March 11, 2003
AS THE NATION'S unemployment rate has risen, welfare caseloads in many states have been creeping up after years of reform-fueled declines. Welfare-to-work worked, of course, when the economy was booming; but now, industries that provide many opportunities for the working poor are struggling. In February alone, the U.S. economy shed 300,000 jobs -- more than 200,000 of them in service industries, according to labor figures released Friday. States' efforts to reduce their poorest citizens' dependence on handouts will suffer if the bust continues, welfare experts worry; as always, the last hired are among the first fired or laid off. So tomorrow, when the Senate Finance Committee takes up welfare reform, uppermost in members' minds should be recession-proof alternatives that build on the success of the current program.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 1997
ST. LOUIS -- Five months ago, businessman Robert Shapiro became a powerful recruit in the campaign to transform welfare.Shapiro was listening in August when President Clinton challenged every boss who had ever grumbled about public assistance to "try to hire someone off welfare, and try hard."He called in his company's personnel planners and directed them to find jobs -- careers even -- for welfare recipients.While they were at it, Shapiro said, they should lean on the companies that supplied his business with goods and services to do the same.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democratic leaders unveiled their own welfare legislation yesterday -- offering variations on some Republican proposals, including a five-year limit on benefits, heavy emphasis on work and greater flexibility for states.But, unlike GOP bills, the Democratic measure would maintain the 60-year government guarantee that anyone who qualifies for welfare benefits can get them, regardless of the cost to the government. And it would prohibit states from dropping benefits below 1988 levels.
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | June 15, 1995
Madison, Wis. -- AS THE SENATE takes up the issue of welfare reform, Gov. Tommy Thompson has a blunt message for the lawmakers back in Washington: "The first thing I'm going to say is something that most people don't really want to hear, and that is, it costs more to change the system."In the long run, of course, putting welfare recipients to work should save money. But not any time soon. Job training, health benefits, child care, transportation -- they're all necessary, expensive and unpopular.
NEWS
By Bruce L. Bortz | October 22, 1992
IMAGINE a race for the U.S. Senate in which the average citizen probably can't identify a single issue separating the candidates. That pretty well describes the little-talked-about tussle between Barbara Mikulski and Alan Keyes.Marylanders had their chance. During the Senate campaign's sole televised debate Monday night, the candidates' differences were more than evident, as was Mr. Keyes' superior oratorical skill. Alas, the Keyes-Mikulski debate followed the third and final presidential debate on Maryland Public Television, and precious few Marylanders stayed tuned.
NEWS
March 11, 2003
AS THE NATION'S unemployment rate has risen, welfare caseloads in many states have been creeping up after years of reform-fueled declines. Welfare-to-work worked, of course, when the economy was booming; but now, industries that provide many opportunities for the working poor are struggling. In February alone, the U.S. economy shed 300,000 jobs -- more than 200,000 of them in service industries, according to labor figures released Friday. States' efforts to reduce their poorest citizens' dependence on handouts will suffer if the bust continues, welfare experts worry; as always, the last hired are among the first fired or laid off. So tomorrow, when the Senate Finance Committee takes up welfare reform, uppermost in members' minds should be recession-proof alternatives that build on the success of the current program.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Resurrecting a popular social program from the Great Depression, Congress is advancing a $400 million pilot project that would require welfare recipients and the unemployed to work in government jobs rebuilding their communities.The welfare reform legislation is a modern-day spinoff of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's famous Works Progress Administration.The WPA paid more than 3 million of the nation's unemployed to construct roads, bridges, airfields and schools between 1935 and 1943.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Kate Shatzkin and David L. Greene and Kate Shatzkin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush proposed yesterday to change the landmark 1996 welfare law to toughen work requirements for recipients and to subsidize programs that encourage the poor to marry. The plan would also extend a ban that bars legal immigrants from receiving aid for five years. The reforms enacted under President Bill Clinton - which ended welfare as a permanent safety net and for the first time forced recipients to find jobs - succeeded, Bush said, but work remains. "We ended welfare as we've known it, yet it is not a post-poverty America," the president said at a Catholic church in a low-income section of Washington.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 1997
ST. LOUIS -- Five months ago, businessman Robert Shapiro became a powerful recruit in the campaign to transform welfare.Shapiro was listening in August when President Clinton challenged every boss who had ever grumbled about public assistance to "try to hire someone off welfare, and try hard."He called in his company's personnel planners and directed them to find jobs -- careers even -- for welfare recipients.While they were at it, Shapiro said, they should lean on the companies that supplied his business with goods and services to do the same.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1997
In Baltimore, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is losing sleep as he listens to the clock, ticking away. As dawn breaks in Randallstown, Sheryl Lindsay finishes her shift, grateful that the unforgiving clock is not ticking for her.Last month, the welfare time limit began running in Maryland, giving government officials five years to put half of their caseload of welfare recipients to work. If the march of time is agonizing for officeholders, it is ominous for Sheryl Lindsay and anyone who might ever have to fall back on public assistance.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1996
EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. -- In this Mississippi River city populated mostly by welfare mothers and their children, government is a lifeline, not a bad word.For a generation, East St. Louis has been a postmark of urban blight. To conservatives who live outside its borders, it serves as a shorthand for everything wrong with liberal solutions. Socially concerned liberals come here periodically to use the city as a canvas to paint stark pictures of the inequities of American life.Half the people in East St. Louis live in government housing, so federal bureaucrats are their landlords.
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | June 15, 1995
Madison, Wis. -- AS THE SENATE takes up the issue of welfare reform, Gov. Tommy Thompson has a blunt message for the lawmakers back in Washington: "The first thing I'm going to say is something that most people don't really want to hear, and that is, it costs more to change the system."In the long run, of course, putting welfare recipients to work should save money. But not any time soon. Job training, health benefits, child care, transportation -- they're all necessary, expensive and unpopular.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democratic leaders unveiled their own welfare legislation yesterday -- offering variations on some Republican proposals, including a five-year limit on benefits, heavy emphasis on work and greater flexibility for states.But, unlike GOP bills, the Democratic measure would maintain the 60-year government guarantee that anyone who qualifies for welfare benefits can get them, regardless of the cost to the government. And it would prohibit states from dropping benefits below 1988 levels.
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | March 22, 1994
President Clinton has an unlikely choir of new Democrats and old Republicans singing from the same welfare-reform hymnal. The refrain is to ''end welfare as we know it'' by requiring recipients to work after a limited time on the welfare rolls. Many governors, including Governor Schaefer, have joined in the chorus. The Maryland General Assembly considering a bill to mandate work after 18 months.This movement has been heralded as a fresh, tough approach to the catastrophic social problem of welfare dependency.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1996
EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. -- In this Mississippi River city populated mostly by welfare mothers and their children, government is a lifeline, not a bad word.For a generation, East St. Louis has been a postmark of urban blight. To conservatives who live outside its borders, it serves as a shorthand for everything wrong with liberal solutions. Socially concerned liberals come here periodically to use the city as a canvas to paint stark pictures of the inequities of American life.Half the people in East St. Louis live in government housing, so federal bureaucrats are their landlords.
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | March 22, 1994
President Clinton has an unlikely choir of new Democrats and old Republicans singing from the same welfare-reform hymnal. The refrain is to ''end welfare as we know it'' by requiring recipients to work after a limited time on the welfare rolls. Many governors, including Governor Schaefer, have joined in the chorus. The Maryland General Assembly considering a bill to mandate work after 18 months.This movement has been heralded as a fresh, tough approach to the catastrophic social problem of welfare dependency.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to discourage the formation of long-term welfare families, the Clinton administration's welfare-reform task force intends to recommend that teen-agers who qualify for aid be prohibited from receiving it unless they live with a parent or other responsible adult, sources said yesterday.The change is intended to eliminate what some analysts view as an incentive for unmarried young women to have children: the ability to establish their own households with the aid of welfare payments.
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