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By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Seven Baltimore-area student-athletes were among the 13 state recipients chosen for the 2013 Minds In Motion Scholarships, provided by The Allstate Foundation. A luncheon held in their honor will take place June 4 at M&T Bank Stadium, where each of the winners will receive a $1,000 scholarship. Dr. Lillian Lowery, state superintendent of schools, will be the guest speaker. This is the sixth year for the scholarship program, which awards $1,000 toward post-secondary education to each of the female and male senior student-athletes chosen who attend an MPSSAA school and participate in MPSSAA recognized sports.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Baltimore has received a $1.1 million federal grant to create a plan for the reconstruction or revitalization of Hanover Street's Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge and other parts of the busy South Baltimore corridor, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. The project is one of 72 nationwide that will receive funding under the federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery program for 2014, U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced Friday. Earlier this week, Sens.
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NEWS
August 13, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman announced last week that the Video Lottery Facility Local Development Council has selected 11 recipients to receive a total of $100,000 in community support grants. Funds for the grants come from the Maryland Live Casino gaming tax. The top-funded projects include the Villages of Dorchester, which received $22,725 to purchase street lights and a security camera system; the Boys & Girls Clubs, which received $15,000 for its Severn location; the PTA from Severn Elementary School, which obtained $15,000 for technology purchases such as iPads; and Hebron-Harman Elementary School PTA, which received $10,000 to create an outdoor learning space and purchase iPads.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2014
Maryland officials are poised to again review their Medicaid rolls for those who no longer qualify. The state ceased such reviews for six months as it worked to open the new online marketplace for people to buy public and private insurance plans and adjust to new rules. The absence of such reviews was estimated to cost taxpayers up to $30 million, though officials believe the amount will be lower. "There will be some kind of analysis," said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, state health secretary.
NEWS
December 4, 2011
It was big news in Oregon last week when a local TV reporter discovered he could use a supplemental nutrition card to buy a Starbucks frappuccino. In Washington, Republicans suggested that banning millionaires from becoming eligible for food stamp benefits could help finance an extension of the payroll tax cut. And even here in Maryland, local talk show hosts were wagging their fingers over a recent report that Maryland has a relatively high food stamp overpayment rate of 6.11 percent, a problem that is far more attributable to administrative error than fraud.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 16, 2012
The Social Security Administration announced Tuesday that 56 million retirement beneficiaries are set to get a cost-of-living raise of 1.7 percent next year. The same goes for the 8 million people receiving disability payments from the agency. The raise is tied to inflation. Checks this year went up 3.6 percent, after two years when inflation was so low that beneficiaries didn't get a raise at all. In addition, the agency announced that the level of earnings subject to the Social Security tax is going up $3,600 to $113,700 next year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- They wore baseball caps and golf shirts and, some of them, hearing aids. They talked about wives and ex-wives, reminisced about 10-cent bottles of beer and just laughed a lot. Only the pointed gold medals dangling from their necks hinted that this was a convention of old heroes.There was Lewis Lee Millett, his Army crew cut still sharp at age 77, who in Korea led a bayonet charge up a hill against enemy fire. And Ronald Ray, 56, who in Vietnam shielded his men from a grenade by diving in front of it. And Jack Montgomery, a small, quiet man of 80, who in World War II killed 11 Germans and captured 32 others in a single battle.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The nation's 62-year-old welfare system, condemned last year by federal law, will formally die tomorrow, and a season of state legislative debate has brought new clarity to the decentralized system rising in its place.If the emerging programs share a unifying theme, it can be summarized in a word: work. States are demanding that recipients find it faster, keep it longer and perform it as a condition of aid. Most states regard even a low-paying, dead-end job preferable to the education and training programs they offered in the past.
NEWS
May 2, 1991
The Sexual Assault Recovery Center, 1010 St. Paul St., and Margaret Savko, a volunteer at the center, have been named the recipients of the sixth Annual Governor's Victim Assistance Award.Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Victim Assistance Network chose the recipients.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | February 20, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer said today he has stopped writing his sometimes controversial letters to constituents because the recipients had gone public with them."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Maryland must spend as much as $30.5 million more to provide Medicaid coverage to Marylanders because the state's glitch-riddled health exchange website can't tell whether they are still eligible. It's another problem exacerbated by the software that has been causing headaches since the exchange website launched on Oct. 1 for those trying to get into the expanded Medicaid program or buy private insurance with subsidies. This issue identified in a legislative report only applies to people already in Medicaid, the federal-state program for the poor.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Tisha Guthrie applied for a housing voucher in 2004 when she became legally blind. After waiting five years for approval, she says, she still struggled for a long time to find quality housing. She had lived in one Mount Vernon apartment for a year before she began a seven-month search for a place in Baltimore County, where she thought she'd find more adequate housing in a quieter setting. "I'd stop by leasing offices and it'd be going well, but when I told them I have vouchers, they'd turn me away," she said.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Tracey Coleman understands that many people are skeptical about the federal food stamp program, and she agrees that some reform may be needed. But the 43-year-old Essex woman also knows food stamps have kept her family fed since her husband was laid off from the Sparrows Point steel plant last year. And she doesn't believe the broad cuts Congress is considering are the right thing to do. "It's made a difference in our life," said Coleman, who is raising three children, including a daughter who is autistic.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman announced last week that the Video Lottery Facility Local Development Council has selected 11 recipients to receive a total of $100,000 in community support grants. Funds for the grants come from the Maryland Live Casino gaming tax. The top-funded projects include the Villages of Dorchester, which received $22,725 to purchase street lights and a security camera system; the Boys & Girls Clubs, which received $15,000 for its Severn location; the PTA from Severn Elementary School, which obtained $15,000 for technology purchases such as iPads; and Hebron-Harman Elementary School PTA, which received $10,000 to create an outdoor learning space and purchase iPads.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | September 7, 2008
The Internet Crime Complaint Center issued another warning about the hit man e-mail scheme that first surfaced a couple years ago and, more recently, earlier this year. The center said it continues to receive thousands of reports on the hit man e-mail, but it warns that the content has evolved since late 2006. The two new versions of the scheme started appearing in July. One e-mail instructed recipients to contact a designated telephone number, and the other e-mail claimed the recipient or a "loved one" would be kidnapped unless a ransom was paid.
NEWS
July 24, 2006
During a decade of welfare reform, many states have shown tremendous progress - not only in reduced numbers on the welfare rolls but also in better prospects for families and children once a parent has gained steady and meaningful employment. But recent proposed federal regulations meant to help implement the next phase of reform seem to turn progress on its head. The new rules, which go into effect Oct. 1, represent changes to the welfare reform program that were passed as part of the Deficit Reduction Act this year.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
For most of the summer, Nick Wiesing, 14, spends his time working on a farm near central New York. His new friend, Patrick Higgins, 18, would spend a typical week working at a senior living center or relaxing in the air conditioning at his house in Pennsylvania. This summer, though, they both spent a week of their vacation in Anne Arundel County renovating a home in Brooklyn Park by day and sleeping on the floor of a Severn church by night. They're among more than 300 teens who converged on Anne Arundel last week on a Christian mission to help others through home repairs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 27, 2013
Sometimes all you can do is shake your head when you hear what people go through in this life. I'm not even talking about extraordinary circumstances, either. I don't mean surviving wars or train wrecks, climbing mountains or traversing deserts. I just mean the tough, daily grind of the poor — trying to make ends meet, to keep your stomach from growling, to keep your eye on a dream while the world seems to collapse around you. Twenty-one-year-old Jeané Baker managed to do this.
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