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Recidivism

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NEWS
August 14, 2013
Any reduction in recidivism rates is good news ( "Under Maynard, prisons have crises, but fewer repeat offenders," Aug. 10). People are less likely to return to prison if they have jobs, a safe place to live, and the will to succeed. Children are reunited with parents, and communities become stronger when there is less criminal activity. Achieving this kind of success is not easy. It requires a serious commitment from the person who was formerly incarcerated as well as state and local entities, plus the knowledge base of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
The U.S. Justice Department's announcement last week that it would seek clemency applications from thousands of federal prisoners was a major departure for an administration that has made minimal use of its powers to grant inmates early release. But the potential freeing of thousands of inmates is not completely unknown for the federal justice system — and advocates for shorter sentences say experience shows prisoners can be released without harming the public. Previous changes to sentencing rules have led to early release for tens of thousands of inmates serving time for crack convictions.
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NEWS
October 8, 2013
We applaud agency officials who have made prisoners' reentry to the community a priority by providing employment training and other services to them prior to release ( "Closing prison's revolving door," Oct. 2). But Maryland could realize even lower reoffending rates if it adopts proactive policies and invests more in programs with track records of keeping people out of prisons and jails. One policy change that could lead to lower reoffending rates is ending the automatic prosecution of youth as adults for certain crimes.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
We applaud agency officials who have made prisoners' reentry to the community a priority by providing employment training and other services to them prior to release ( "Closing prison's revolving door," Oct. 2). But Maryland could realize even lower reoffending rates if it adopts proactive policies and invests more in programs with track records of keeping people out of prisons and jails. One policy change that could lead to lower reoffending rates is ending the automatic prosecution of youth as adults for certain crimes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2013
Timing is everything — in love, comedy, trapeze acts, pastry and politics. Of course, to be successful in any of those ventures, you need keen senses, a super awareness of things, even prescience. But no matter how big your brain, your timing is critical. On this count, a couple of candidates for Maryland governor need work. Anthony Brown, the lieutenant governor, is so eager for a promotion, he declared his candidacy way before anyone cared. The early jump helps him lock up campaign contributions, but he risks peaking too soon.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
The U.S. Justice Department's announcement last week that it would seek clemency applications from thousands of federal prisoners was a major departure for an administration that has made minimal use of its powers to grant inmates early release. But the potential freeing of thousands of inmates is not completely unknown for the federal justice system — and advocates for shorter sentences say experience shows prisoners can be released without harming the public. Previous changes to sentencing rules have led to early release for tens of thousands of inmates serving time for crack convictions.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 25, 2004
Drug courts successfully treat drug users, reduce criminal recidivism and save money, according to studies of two Maryland drug courts released yesterday. The studies, by Oregon-based NPC Research, looked at drug courts in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County, two of the longest-established of Maryland's 11 drug courts. The studies were released as the administration of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. looks to divert more drug users into treatment instead of jail, and as Maryland's judiciary is planning to add 10 more around the state.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The percentage of Maryland ex-offenders likely to return to prison within three years of release has fallen by double digits since 2000, state prison officials reported Monday. Secretary Gary D. Maynard, the top official at the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, credited the prison system's improved educational and job skills training programs, as well as stronger partnerships with state agencies that provide medical and mental health services to inmates and upon their release.
NEWS
By James Foley | October 14, 1996
HAGERSTOWN -- Some 1.6 million Americans are incarcerated, an unprecedented number, and a doubling in just over 10 years. Yet actual crime rates have been declining and the economy has been improving. The explanation probably involves growing public intolerance of crime and frustration over ineffective corrections.The baby-boom ''echo'' will bring forth in the next 10 years a tidal wave of 18-to-24-year olds, the age group with the highest crime rate. Female crime rates are also rising steadily.
EXPLORE
By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 20, 2011
One of the most vexing quandaries about the penal system is keeping the same folks from returning again and again and again. Recidivism, if you will. With that in mind, Harford County started a mediation program in May as another effort to lessen the chances that recently-released prisoners will fall into the same patterns that can only lead them back to jail. To underscore the importance of the program, Harford County leaders recently gathered as a way to highlight the program and what it can may for those returning to society and which can only be a good thing for the law-abiding folks.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The percentage of Maryland ex-offenders likely to return to prison within three years of release has fallen by double digits since 2000, state prison officials reported Monday. Secretary Gary D. Maynard, the top official at the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, credited the prison system's improved educational and job skills training programs, as well as stronger partnerships with state agencies that provide medical and mental health services to inmates and upon their release.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Any reduction in recidivism rates is good news ( "Under Maynard, prisons have crises, but fewer repeat offenders," Aug. 10). People are less likely to return to prison if they have jobs, a safe place to live, and the will to succeed. Children are reunited with parents, and communities become stronger when there is less criminal activity. Achieving this kind of success is not easy. It requires a serious commitment from the person who was formerly incarcerated as well as state and local entities, plus the knowledge base of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2013
Timing is everything — in love, comedy, trapeze acts, pastry and politics. Of course, to be successful in any of those ventures, you need keen senses, a super awareness of things, even prescience. But no matter how big your brain, your timing is critical. On this count, a couple of candidates for Maryland governor need work. Anthony Brown, the lieutenant governor, is so eager for a promotion, he declared his candidacy way before anyone cared. The early jump helps him lock up campaign contributions, but he risks peaking too soon.
EXPLORE
By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 20, 2011
One of the most vexing quandaries about the penal system is keeping the same folks from returning again and again and again. Recidivism, if you will. With that in mind, Harford County started a mediation program in May as another effort to lessen the chances that recently-released prisoners will fall into the same patterns that can only lead them back to jail. To underscore the importance of the program, Harford County leaders recently gathered as a way to highlight the program and what it can may for those returning to society and which can only be a good thing for the law-abiding folks.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
After reading Andrea Walker 's story about Marge Walker and Goodwill Industries, I felt that it should have appeared in a more prominent place in your newspaper ("Goodwill has grown; so have needs," May 29). Nonprofits like Goodwill perform outstanding service to the community. We spend hundreds of thousands of dollars incarcerating men and women for various crimes, often with little thought of their need for housing and job-training upon release to help them transition back into society and reduce the possibility of recidivism.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
After reading Andrea Walker 's story about Marge Walker and Goodwill Industries, I felt that it should have appeared in a more prominent place in your newspaper ("Goodwill has grown; so have needs," May 29). Nonprofits like Goodwill perform outstanding service to the community. We spend hundreds of thousands of dollars incarcerating men and women for various crimes, often with little thought of their need for housing and job-training upon release to help them transition back into society and reduce the possibility of recidivism.
NEWS
March 23, 1994
As politicians have been busy this year proposing and pondering tough new ways to fight crime, they have not ignored juvenile offenders, particularly those who commit felonies. But what to do with the thousands of youths each year who get caught in minor infractions that could be the first steps toward more serious criminal activity? Fortunately for Howard County families, the local police department offers the "Diversion" program in which first-time juvenile offenders can sidestep the usual criminal justice track while atoning and taking responsibility for their misdeeds.
NEWS
By Irving J. Taylor and Kurt L. Schmoke | July 25, 2010
Assuming one agrees that necessity is the mother of invention, this is an opportune time for state government to devise new policies that will make our communities healthier and safer. One focus of those new policies should be the scourge of illegal drugs. For many years, and from our different professional perspectives, we have urged government to adopt an approach that treats illegal drug use as primarily a public health problem rather than a criminal justice problem. One of us is a psychiatrist and health administrator with more than 60 years of experience working with substance-abusing people.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 1, 2007
Martin O'Malley mentioned Baltimore one time in his sleepy little State of the State speech yesterday in Annapolis. Geezy-peezy. For a guy who thinks the state of Maryland is strong (the second-wealthiest state in the nation) but "not as strong as we should be," he might have mentioned one of the main reasons why -- the city he just served as mayor for seven years. OK, six. He really spent the last year campaigning for governor, with his adopted hometown clearly in the rearview mirror for much of that time.
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