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By Margo Harakas and Margo Harakas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
Americans are increasingly unplugged, using on average five cordless electronic products every day. In just three years, says Ralph Mallard, executive vice president of the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corp., America's reliance on cordless electronics has increased nearly 75 percent. Everything from cell phones, camcorders and laptop computers to razors, toothbrushes and remote-controlled toys are powered by rechargeable batteries. That means a heap of toxic material, including cadmium and lead, to dispose of once the batteries are spent.
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED | July 10, 2008
I am considering a new Dell XPS model with all the processing hardware built right into the monitor, plus a wireless keyboard, mouse and Blu-Ray player. What is your opinion of this system compared with using a separate desktop computer and monitor? Essentially, the top-of-the-line Dell XPS unit that I am considering has no options - it comes with just about everything except a backup hard drive, which can be added. Price is about $2,099. - Chuck Woods There's nothing in the world wrong with the technical specifications for the machine you want.
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | April 24, 2008
I am using a UPS (uninterruptable power supply) with my plasma TV. I believe that's what you recommended in an earlier column. However, a friend says that I don't need to use the UPS. What's the deal? - James Allen My recommendation is that a UPS is darn near a necessity for HDTVs that use a projection bulb (rear projection or the type that project the image to a screen). Otherwise, if power goes out, the fan that cools the bulb after shutdown won't work and you stand a really good chance of ruining a bulb that costs between $200 and $500.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | April 24, 2008
I am using a UPS (uninterruptable power supply) with my plasma TV. I believe that's what you recommended in an earlier column. However, a friend says that I don't need to use the UPS. What's the deal? - James Allen My recommendation is that a UPS is darn near a necessity for HDTVs that use a projection bulb (rear projection or the type that project the image to a screen). Otherwise, if power goes out, the fan that cools the bulb after shutdown won't work and you stand a really good chance of ruining a bulb that costs between $200 and $500.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | February 18, 1991
Several companies are offering new lines of rechargeable batteries, to try to get consumers to throw away their disposable alkalines for good.Companies like Sanyo and Gates have brought out new brands, under the names Sanyo and Millennium, with changes they hope will make them more appealing to consumers.Rechargeables have been available for decades, but aside from their use in small appliances like hand-held vacuums and tools, they have yet to catch on with the public.Technical refinements in the recharging units have shortened the time needed to replenish the batteries' strength.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 22, 1990
Forget Santa. Rechargeable Rick is main man on Christmas at our house.Rick, who looks like a D battery with biceps, is the cartoon figure Panasonic Industrial Co. has chosen to tell us how to keep rechargeable batteries happy.I became acquainted with Rick after making a substantial contribution to Panasonic. I went to a toy store and forked over a ridiculous amount of money for "remote control" vehicles. Then I paid an even more absurd sum for the batteries and the recharger needed to keep the toys zipping around.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
Twelve-year-old Greg Lemich had thrown away countless used alkaline batteries from portable electronic games and stereos before he even thought of trying out the rechargeable batteries he got as a present.The problem was, the Mayfield Woods Middle School seventh-grader didn't understand how rechargeable batteries worked, and he wasn't sure whether it was worth his time to use them.But after months of research, Greg became a convert. His project, "Should I Switch to Using Rechargeable Batteries?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000
Sony CD player puts 21st-century features in a portable package Staring at Sony's new D-EJ915 CD Walkman ($250), it's hard not to exclaim: "How on Earth did they do that?!" This impressive portable CD player manages to cram the drive mechanism, the electronics and two rechargeable batteries into a space not much thicker than a short stack of CDs. Besides the impressive hardware compression, the D-EJ915 offers other 21st-century features. It has a backlighted electro-luminescent LCD remote with all the controls found on the player.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | February 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- After five to seven years, rechargeable batteries typically become rechargeable no more. Tossed into the trash, they begin an extended discharge into ground, air and water, where their potential to do harm is vast.Responding to growing concern about the environmental consequences of these common products, Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. announced yesterday a new program to take back the rechargeable batteries used in its popular cordless mixers, screwdrivers, vacuum cleaners, drills, can openers and other products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2001
When digital cameras first became available, people would often crowd around me at a party to look at my gadget's tiny display after I took a photo. High tech can be a cool status symbol, whether it's a handheld computer or a robotic dog that can bark in three different languages. That's cool. But some technologies seem flat-out boring. Batteries, no matter how nifty, are unlikely to draw a crowd at your next party. Imagine sidling up to someone and saying, "My new lithium ion battery is giving me a 40 percent longer operating cycle on my laptop than the old nickel cadmium battery."
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 20, 2007
There are few sights sadder than a kid with a new robot, truck, talking doll or hand-held poker game that won't play because Mom, Dad or Grandma forgot one simple thing: the batteries. Sadly, millions of youngsters will be disappointed Christmas morning by this or some other glitch that makes electronic gift-giving a source of parental peril as well as pleasure. But whether it's a battery-powered toy, a computer, a camera or a new high-def TV, there's still time to make sure it works when the family unwraps it - and you'll spend your day enjoying the gift instead of debugging it. First things first.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 30, 2007
If you like sitting out on the patio at night but want to add a little light to your surroundings, there's another choice besides candles and tiki torches. While solar path lighting has been around for years, manufacturers only recently have introduced outdoor table lamps with rechargeable solar batteries. "The beauty of these lamps is that they don't look much different from indoor table lamps that are usually chosen based on decor style," writes Skip Teeters, outdoor lighting product manager for Hampton Bay and Home Depot, which recently came out with rechargeable solar table lamps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
My brother-in-law Bill is so tight, when his old Honda Civic is coasting down a hill, he slips it out of gear and idles the engine to save gas. I'm not that cheap, but now I've gone him one better. Last month I bought a 2002 Prius, Toyota's gasoline-electric hybrid compact. When I'm coasting, or braking, or even sitting at a red light in my new car, I'm burning no gasoline at all. Better still, the Prius quietly recaptures some of that momentum and braking energy that's wasted as heat in conventional cars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Margo Harakas and Margo Harakas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
Americans are increasingly unplugged, using on average five cordless electronic products every day. In just three years, says Ralph Mallard, executive vice president of the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corp., America's reliance on cordless electronics has increased nearly 75 percent. Everything from cell phones, camcorders and laptop computers to razors, toothbrushes and remote-controlled toys are powered by rechargeable batteries. That means a heap of toxic material, including cadmium and lead, to dispose of once the batteries are spent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 12, 2002
High-tech gifts generate lots of excitement on Christmas morning, but they present a certain peril that traditional presents just don't generate. When your child unwraps a Barbie doll, a football, a Frisbee or a Slinky, you never have to worry about whether it's going to work. With computers, DVD players, video game consoles and other gadgets, there's always that element of doubt: What's going to happen when I turn it on? If there's a problem, you can wind up with a very disappointed family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2002
Treat it wrong and it can set your pants on fire. Treat it right and you can talk a little longer on your cell phone. Batteries aren't glamorous. In fact, you seldom think of them until they stop working. Then your cellular phone won't ring. Your laptop computer stops working. Your car won't start. And that fancy little palm-sized computer of yours is just a lump in your pocket. Batteries are the Rodney Dangerfield of technology. But give them a little respect and you can save hundreds of dollars a year.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 20, 2007
There are few sights sadder than a kid with a new robot, truck, talking doll or hand-held poker game that won't play because Mom, Dad or Grandma forgot one simple thing: the batteries. Sadly, millions of youngsters will be disappointed Christmas morning by this or some other glitch that makes electronic gift-giving a source of parental peril as well as pleasure. But whether it's a battery-powered toy, a computer, a camera or a new high-def TV, there's still time to make sure it works when the family unwraps it - and you'll spend your day enjoying the gift instead of debugging it. First things first.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2001
When digital cameras first became available, people would often crowd around me at a party to look at my gadget's tiny display after I took a photo. High tech can be a cool status symbol, whether it's a handheld computer or a robotic dog that can bark in three different languages. That's cool. But some technologies seem flat-out boring. Batteries, no matter how nifty, are unlikely to draw a crowd at your next party. Imagine sidling up to someone and saying, "My new lithium ion battery is giving me a 40 percent longer operating cycle on my laptop than the old nickel cadmium battery."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000
Sony CD player puts 21st-century features in a portable package Staring at Sony's new D-EJ915 CD Walkman ($250), it's hard not to exclaim: "How on Earth did they do that?!" This impressive portable CD player manages to cram the drive mechanism, the electronics and two rechargeable batteries into a space not much thicker than a short stack of CDs. Besides the impressive hardware compression, the D-EJ915 offers other 21st-century features. It has a backlighted electro-luminescent LCD remote with all the controls found on the player.
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