Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReceivership
IN THE NEWS

Receivership

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
Debt collection law firm Mann Bracken, which threw the courts and collections industry into disarray after abruptly shutting its doors last month, has been placed into receivership by the Montgomery County Circuit Court. The firm's attorney, James M. Hoffman, said a receiver was appointed Thursday at Mann Bracken's request. Receivership is an alternative to filing for bankruptcy protection. Mann Bracken said in January that it could not continue handling the cases it had filed against consumers on behalf of creditors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Hundreds more problem properties in Baltimore are finding new buyers as the city steps up the use of decades-old law designed to root out negligent owners. The law, which community groups pioneered in the early 1990s, allows property owners to be sued for code violations and lose their buildings if they fail to make repairs. But until recently, transferring homes to new owners through a court-appointed receiver happened in just a few dozen cases each year. Now as part of its Vacants to Value initiative, the city is putting more focus on the law, swelling the auction lists.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 1, 1991
The Office of Thrift Supervision has placed Augusta Federal Savings Bank of Baltimore, which has a branch in Carroll County, in receivership and chartered a new federal mutual institution to take its place.The new institution, Augusta Federal Savings Association, will assume certain assets and liabilities of the old thrift and will operate in conservatorship under the management of the Resolution Trust Corp.The receivership did not result in any interruption of Augusta Federal's day-to-day operations.
BUSINESS
By By Jamie Smith Hopkins | The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2010
Debt-collection law firm Mann Bracken, which threw the courts and the collections industry into disarray after abruptly shutting its doors last month, has been placed into receivership and will have its assets liquidated. Receivership, an unusual step in Maryland, is an alternative to filing for bankruptcy protection. The firm's attorney, James M. Hoffman, said a receiver was appointed Thursday by the Montgomery County Circuit Court at Mann Bracken's request. "Mann Bracken believed that the Circuit Court receivership was the best way to benefit clients, creditors and third parties," said Cheryl E. Rose, the receiver.
NEWS
By Alan Craver and Alan Craver,Staff Writer | October 8, 1992
Industrial Lighting Holding Co. of Elkridge has gone into receivership after defaulting on several bank loans, according to documents filed in Howard Circuit Court.The Elkridge National Bank asked the court to name a receiver for the company after it did not repay nearly $315,000 in loans.Circuit Judge James B. Dudley signed an order on Oct. 2 appointing Financial Conservators Inc. as the receiver for the company.Financial Conservators will protect the remaining assets of the company and manage it until the bank gets its money back.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge approved yesterday a deal for another health plan to take over the patients and physician network of PrimeHealth Corp., which has been in receivership for 2 1/2 years. The approval by Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan came despite the objections of PrimeHealth's owners and a last-minute higher bid from another insurer. State Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, the receiver who has been running PrimeHealth, sought Kaplan's permission to turn over PrimeHealth's Medicaid patients to Americaid, which covers about 100,000 Medicaid members in the state, in return for $630,000, which would go to PrimeHealth creditors.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has rejected a request to end the receivership of a health maintenance organization but chided state insurance officials for failing to file tax returns and collect $500,000 owed the firm. In an 11-page ruling, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan denied a motion by Christian Chinwuba to end the receivership of PrimeHealth, a Lanham-based HMO that serves hundreds of low-income patients in the Baltimore area. Chinwuba, a radiologist who founded the health care company four years ago, had contended that state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen never had the right to take control of the company and that, in any case, it was no longer insolvent.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1991
The state has abandoned its attempt to put Blind Industries and Services of Maryland into temporary receivership, settling for an independent audit of the agency's operations over the last 29 months.City Circuit Court Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan, in ordering the review of programs and finances, said yesterday that the state will have to pay for the audit but may be compensated by the quasi-public agency if any wrongdoing or mismanagement is uncovered.In a lawsuit filed by the Maryland attorney general last week, the state asked that the state Department of Education be appointed as a receiver to oversee assets of the Blind Industries, a Baltimore-based non-profit group providing education, training and jobs for blind adults.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2004
With the city school system heading toward insolvency, the unthinkable becomes thinkable. Radical fixes are tossed about with deadly seriousness - such as state takeovers and replacing the school board. Here's what authorities said yesterday about the legal ramifications of some of the proposals on the table. Fire the school board. State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick can do so, with the approval of the governor. But there's a catch, said lawyers for the state Board of Education.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
The health care company at the center of a criminal probe of former state Sen. Larry Young has been placed in receivership, putting it under the immediate control of state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen.Under a court-approved consent agreement made public yesterday, Larsen will control the day-to-day operations of PrimeHealth Corp. of Lanham, a health maintenance organization that won a license and a lucrative state contract with the help of Young.The company agreed to the takeover order but did not admit to any wrongdoing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
Debt collection law firm Mann Bracken, which threw the courts and collections industry into disarray after abruptly shutting its doors last month, has been placed into receivership by the Montgomery County Circuit Court. The firm's attorney, James M. Hoffman, said a receiver was appointed Thursday at Mann Bracken's request. Receivership is an alternative to filing for bankruptcy protection. Mann Bracken said in January that it could not continue handling the cases it had filed against consumers on behalf of creditors.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will seek legislation that could place the troubled Baltimore school system in fiscal receivership, saying yesterday that he wanted broader authority to bypass a city school board that has been reluctant to impose pay cuts to close a widening deficit. "Let the word go out: All obstacles to fiscal accountability must go," Ehrlich said as he formally rejected a schools restructuring proposal as grossly inadequate. "If that includes the school board, that includes the school board."
NEWS
February 25, 2004
THERE IS NO question that the Baltimore school system is in a deep financial bind, that the cash-flow problem must be addressed quickly and thoroughly, and that the school board has demonstrated its ineffectiveness. So when Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday he wanted legislation that would allow him to force the system into receivership, why did he leave the impression that he had an unspoken agenda? A place to begin looking for an answer to that would be the letter his budget chief, James C. "Chip" DiPaula Jr., sent to the school board, in which the righteous indignation was heaped on with a trowel.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2004
With the city school system heading toward insolvency, the unthinkable becomes thinkable. Radical fixes are tossed about with deadly seriousness - such as state takeovers and replacing the school board. Here's what authorities said yesterday about the legal ramifications of some of the proposals on the table. Fire the school board. State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick can do so, with the approval of the governor. But there's a catch, said lawyers for the state Board of Education.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge approved yesterday a deal for another health plan to take over the patients and physician network of PrimeHealth Corp., which has been in receivership for 2 1/2 years. The approval by Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan came despite the objections of PrimeHealth's owners and a last-minute higher bid from another insurer. State Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen, the receiver who has been running PrimeHealth, sought Kaplan's permission to turn over PrimeHealth's Medicaid patients to Americaid, which covers about 100,000 Medicaid members in the state, in return for $630,000, which would go to PrimeHealth creditors.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has rejected a request to end the receivership of a health maintenance organization but chided state insurance officials for failing to file tax returns and collect $500,000 owed the firm. In an 11-page ruling, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan denied a motion by Christian Chinwuba to end the receivership of PrimeHealth, a Lanham-based HMO that serves hundreds of low-income patients in the Baltimore area. Chinwuba, a radiologist who founded the health care company four years ago, had contended that state Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen never had the right to take control of the company and that, in any case, it was no longer insolvent.
NEWS
February 25, 2004
THERE IS NO question that the Baltimore school system is in a deep financial bind, that the cash-flow problem must be addressed quickly and thoroughly, and that the school board has demonstrated its ineffectiveness. So when Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday he wanted legislation that would allow him to force the system into receivership, why did he leave the impression that he had an unspoken agenda? A place to begin looking for an answer to that would be the letter his budget chief, James C. "Chip" DiPaula Jr., sent to the school board, in which the righteous indignation was heaped on with a trowel.
NEWS
May 7, 1993
An unusual auction took place recently on the steps of the Clarence E. Mitchell Courthouse. Four abandoned houses, removed from their owners and ordered into receivership by the District Court, were auctioned to developers eager to rehabilitate them into residential units.This kind of legal redistribution of vacant houses will become a routine procedure in coming months. A total of 71 other vacant houses are to be auctioned by Save A. Neighborhood Inc., a non-profit organization the Community Law Center created to help the court dispose of vacant problem houses under a new city receivership law.The Community Law Center is using this new weapon quite successfully.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
The founders of a health maintenance organization taken over by the Maryland Insurance Administration are questioning some of the $1.5 million in "administrative costs" incurred by state consultants in the past two years. During a receivership hearing this week before Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, lawyers for the former operators of PrimeHealth Corp. challenged consultants over spending, including nearly $100,000 on items such as lawn mowing and house cleaning. Goldmark Friendship, the holding company for PrimeHealth, issued a statement yesterday on the spending.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
The founder of a health-care firm seized by the state Insurance Department is suing Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, contending that the Baltimore City Circuit Court judge acted illegally in approving a highly critical financial review of the company. Christian Chinwuba, a Lanham radiologist and majority owner of PrimeHealth Corp., has filed the suit against Kaplan seeking $150 million in compensatory and punitive damages. Through his secretary, Kaplan declined to comment yesterday. The suit, filed late last week in Kaplan's court, comes as the state Insurance Administration is moving to sell the health maintenance organization to Universal Health Plan, a new company.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.