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NEWS
By Linda Chavez | August 14, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Political pundits don't have much to talk about during the dog days of summer when even the president of the United States goes on a month-long vacation, so lt's lucky for us Arnold Schwarzenegger is runnlng for governor in California. Now, news junkies can spend the rest of August watching their favorite talking heads debate whether the Terminator is a closet liberal, an anti-immigrant immigrant or if he has the proper gravitas to govern what most non-Californians regard as the wackiest state in the Union.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
If you weren't watching MSNBC Tuesday night, you missed not only a great night of American politics, but also a glimpse of some of the forces that will shape the big war of 2012 that's heating up. First of all, thanks and much praise to MSNBC for putting so many resources into covering the effort by Wisconsin Democrats to take back the state senate through a recall vote of six Republican senators. The effort was a long shot given that one of the districts in which the recall took place had been GOP for over a 100 years.
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NEWS
By Allison Hoffman and Allison Hoffman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2003
In America, children are raised to believe that anyone with enough ambition, talent and luck can grow up to become president. In California, voters are about to find out that anyone with $3,500 and 65 friends can at least try to become governor. By yesterday afternoon, with eight days to go before the deadline for declaring a candidacy in the Oct. 7 recall election, 258 people statewide had taken the first step of filing papers with their county registrars. Hollywood billboard fixture Angelyne has pulled papers with the Los Angeles County registrar.
NEWS
By FRANK GRUBER | November 17, 2005
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Now that Californians have rejected Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's four initiatives along with two others that he endorsed, there will be much talk about how precipitous was his fall. He was a man, after all, whose popularity not long ago was driving a movement to amend the Constitution to allow the foreign-born to be president. But Governor Schwarzenegger never was that popular. Sure, there was a lot of excitement when he became governor - the "governator" and all that.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2003
NORWALK, Calif. - Add another wacky element to the carnival-like recall election of Gov. Gray Davis in California: Millions of voters will be voting on punch cards, those of pimpled, dimpled chad fame so discredited by Florida in 2000. The punch card was outlawed in California, as of March 2004, because of the Florida chaos. But many counties have not had time to switch to new machinery. Rather than risk a headlong rush toward unfamiliar electronic equipment - a hallmark of Florida's later voting disaster in 2002 - nearly half of California's 58 counties, including Los Angeles, are sticking with punch cards for the recall vote.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair, according to exit polling and early returns in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger, in his first try for elective office, scored a resounding victory in spite of a withering string of last-minute newspaper reports about his alleged improper sexual conduct. Among the keys was his backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from white women, the exit poll showed.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the last scene of the movie The Candidate, a stunned Robert Redford, having run an image campaign with no appreciable political experience and having just been informed he had won, asks: "What do we do now?" After fellow actor Arnold Schwarzenegger's election as governor of California in the recall of the hapless Democratic Gov. Gray Davis, the same response from him would seem appropriate. Some of the things he has said he will do, such as wrestling down a state budget that is at least $8 billion in the red while rolling back Mr. Davis' onerous tripling of California's car license fee, will require more magic than Mr. Schwarzenegger managed to weave in gaining the governor's chair.
NEWS
By Dan Morain, Joel Rubin and Megan Garvey and Dan Morain, Joel Rubin and Megan Garvey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 12, 2003
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California's top election official said yesterday that the recall election is expected to cost about $66 million - the high end of previous estimates - and warned that there will be missteps along the way to a final certification of the outcome, which may be as late as Nov. 15. "Let me be candid: There are going to be problems," said Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, noting that county election officials generally need four to...
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 16, 2003
A federal appeals court ordered California's Oct. 7 recall vote on Gov. Gray Davis postponed, ruling yesterday that if it proceeded on schedule, voters would face an unacceptable risk of errors caused by antiquated punch-card voting machines. The six counties that use punch-card machines, including Los Angeles and San Diego, already were scheduled to replace them in time for the March 2 presidential primary, which would become the likely date of the recall election if yesterday's decision stands.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Dismissing concerns yesterday that error-prone punch-card ballots could significantly affect California's chaotic recall race, a federal appeals court put the historic election back on the calendar for Oct. 7. In setting aside a decision last week by three of its most liberal judges, an 11-member panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also unanimously said California is too far down the road to delay the attempt to oust Gov. Gray...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the last scene of the movie The Candidate, a stunned Robert Redford, having run an image campaign with no appreciable political experience and having just been informed he had won, asks: "What do we do now?" After fellow actor Arnold Schwarzenegger's election as governor of California in the recall of the hapless Democratic Gov. Gray Davis, the same response from him would seem appropriate. Some of the things he has said he will do, such as wrestling down a state budget that is at least $8 billion in the red while rolling back Mr. Davis' onerous tripling of California's car license fee, will require more magic than Mr. Schwarzenegger managed to weave in gaining the governor's chair.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES -- In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger overcame a stream of last-minute newspaper reports about alleged improper sexual conduct to gain elective office on the first try. Among the keys to his victory were backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from women, exit polling showed.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair, according to exit polling and early returns in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger, in his first try for elective office, scored a resounding victory in spite of a withering string of last-minute newspaper reports about his alleged improper sexual conduct. Among the keys was his backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from white women, the exit poll showed.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
Television turned yesterday's election in California into a mixture of civics lesson and all-out celebrity gawk yesterday, as the networks and news channels attempted to figure out what the recall election really meant. Based on exit polls, the answer wasn't all that tough to discern. A breath past 11 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, the news channels and networks projected Arnold Schwarzenegger to have won big in his bid to become governor. In the words of NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw last night, California experienced "a political earthquake."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Dismissing concerns yesterday that error-prone punch-card ballots could significantly affect California's chaotic recall race, a federal appeals court put the historic election back on the calendar for Oct. 7. In setting aside a decision last week by three of its most liberal judges, an 11-member panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also unanimously said California is too far down the road to delay the attempt to oust Gov. Gray...
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 16, 2003
A federal appeals court ordered California's Oct. 7 recall vote on Gov. Gray Davis postponed, ruling yesterday that if it proceeded on schedule, voters would face an unacceptable risk of errors caused by antiquated punch-card voting machines. The six counties that use punch-card machines, including Los Angeles and San Diego, already were scheduled to replace them in time for the March 2 presidential primary, which would become the likely date of the recall election if yesterday's decision stands.
NEWS
By FRANK GRUBER | November 17, 2005
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Now that Californians have rejected Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's four initiatives along with two others that he endorsed, there will be much talk about how precipitous was his fall. He was a man, after all, whose popularity not long ago was driving a movement to amend the Constitution to allow the foreign-born to be president. But Governor Schwarzenegger never was that popular. Sure, there was a lot of excitement when he became governor - the "governator" and all that.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
Television turned yesterday's election in California into a mixture of civics lesson and all-out celebrity gawk yesterday, as the networks and news channels attempted to figure out what the recall election really meant. Based on exit polls, the answer wasn't all that tough to discern. A breath past 11 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, the news channels and networks projected Arnold Schwarzenegger to have won big in his bid to become governor. In the words of NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw last night, California experienced "a political earthquake."
NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Never mind the budget deficit and the energy crisis. In perhaps the most image-conscious state in the nation, Gray Davis' most serious offense may be that he has no discernible style. The eye grows weary of his endless parade of gray suits, his Mister Rogers hair, his turkey neck and his puffy eyes. "He would definitely be a candidate for some of the improvements we do," says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Robert Kotler. "Style? What style?" asks Danny Marsh, co-owner of Sy Devore, the Los Angeles menswear store that outfitted the Rat Pack.
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