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NEWS
December 19, 2005
On balance, it's good news that, more than 100 days after Hurricane Katrina laid waste to New Orleans, President Bush finally got around almost to doubling the $1.6 billion already promised for rebuilding and raising its neglected and damaged life-support system, its hundreds of miles of levees. This time around, administration officials vowed last week, these banks will be built to last, reinforced with concrete and stone and raised to the heights that they were supposed to reach before they dramatically sank into the earth.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2010
The walls might seem to be crumbling at the Warehouse, but Andy MacPhail, the Orioles' president of baseball operations, remains steadfast — or is that stubborn? — in his belief that his long-term rebuilding plan is still on track. That probably sounds a little nutty if you've been watching the team trip over itself the past five weeks. The Orioles got off to the second-worst start in club history. They entered Saturday's doubleheader in Minnesota with the worst record in the major leagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
The author Ishmael Beah grew up listening to his grandmother tell folk tales that explained, among other things, why a spider has a narrow waist. He quickly realized that beneath the whimsy were hidden life lessons he was expected to master. "I would [sit] around the fire every evening and ask my grandmother what the stories meant, and she would refuse to tell me," Beah said. "The stories were like medicine. I was supposed to find the meanings for myself and let them strengthen me. " The boy needed all the strengthening he could get when he was kidnapped at age 13, drafted as a child soldier into Sierra Leone's civil war, and forced to commit atrocities.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 20, 2009
The call is out for energetic community volunteers to rebuild the popular Waverly playground destroyed by an arsonist last year. "We need at least 1,000 persons to step forward," said Marisa Canino, president of Friends of Our Playground. "The fire was a senseless act of arson and we instantly moved to start rebuilding. I can't belive we are so close." Work crews began preliminary regrading and site work last week. The once-popular playing area - north of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Family Center YMCA at Stadium Place, the former location of the old Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street - burned Sept.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | February 10, 2008
Arizona Diamondbacks Low point: Went 51-111 in 2004. Rebuilding approach: Clear veterans to create space for homegrown stars, patch holes with trades or cheaper free agents. Key moves: Drafted ace Brandon Webb, three starting infielders and super-prospect Justin Upton between 2000 and 2006, traded for outfielder Chris Young in 2005 and pitcher Dan Haren in 2007, signed outfielder Eric Byrnes as a free agent. 2007 record: 90-72, won NL West Cleveland Indians Low point: Went 68-94 in 2003.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
To rebuild a largely impoverished, post-industrial city at the end of the 20th century, start with the idea of a village.Returning to the traditional, closely linked structure of a small town is the central concept in 112 initiatives developed by local committees working to obtain for Baltimore a coveted designation as a federal empowerment zone.More than 400 community activists, business leaders and government officials have spent the past two months coming up with proposals to win the designation that could bring as much as $100 million in new federal grants.
NEWS
By ALAN RABINOWITZ | December 27, 2005
Like many Americans, I want to see the region that was devastated by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita transformed into something more sensible environmentally and fairer in socioeconomic terms. There appears to be a lack of urgency prevailing in the complex of governmental and nonprofit organizations, all of which are struggling with the ill-defined and overlapping responsibilities and jurisdictions that characterize America's federal-state-local systems. And where are the voices of those in that myriad of agencies that might be dealing creatively and positively with an improved big picture?
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 28, 1994
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- The Beautiful People are back at the St. Georges Yacht Club, bikinied by the pool and Izoded on the tennis courts.They shift effortlessly from French to Arabic to English; urbane chatter all the more incongruous for its setting.The yacht club sits amid hulking concrete skeletons of battle, the pocked and burned cityscape of the suicidal civil war of Lebanon.But then, this is Beirut. Its red-painted nails never were totally obscured by the grime of war.Lebanon's capital city is being reborn after the 15-year civil war that ended in 1990, including the Israeli invasion of 1982.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein | January 14, 1991
"Surprised?" said coach Wes Unseld, mulling a reporter's question Saturday night after his surging Washington Bullets had routed the Boston Celtics, the team with the best record in the National Basketball Association, 116-99.And then breaking into a slight grin, he said, "Yes, I'm surprised to a degree."Unseld had been asked if the Bullets' upward mobility, eight victories in the past 11 games, had come sooner than anticipated.In most preseason polls, the rebuilding Bullets were ticketed for the lottery and picked to finish higher than only the Miami Heat in the Atlantic Division.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | April 18, 2014
It's been almost a year since Stevenson won the Division III national championship in men's lacrosse, and coach Paul Cantabene still hasn't taken a vacation. Besides being the head coach, Cantabene is also associate athletic director and chairman of the Hall of Fame, recruiting and scheduling committees. But nothing drives him more than lacrosse. "I'm still working on that vacation," said Cantabene, laughing. "The offseason has been similar, but at the same time tougher. There are more obligations, and recruiting is harder.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Southwestern junior Taylor Holmes remembered on Saturday how she and her Sabres teammates felt that no one in the city gave them a chance early in the season to make it to the Baltimore City Division II championship. With only four players back, a new coach and eight transfers, the Sabres had a lot to overcome, but they slowly silenced their critics. A win over Carver just before Christmas break gave the Sabres confidence and showed them, and their opponents, that they could contend for the title.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
Last summer, we sang the praises of Maryland Rep. John K. Delaney's proposal to create a $750 billion fund to rebuild and expand America's neglected public infrastructure. Turns out the freshman Democrat's measure continues to build on its bipartisan support - now with a companion bill introduced in the U.S. Senate. What makes the 6 t h District Democrat's Partnership to Build America Act so appealing is that it hits two birds with one stone. The fund would be financed by borrowing money privately - allowing private companies to repatriate foreign profits by purchasing $50 billion in 50-year bonds that will pay for the badly-needed road, transit, water, sewer, energy and other projects.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Thursday's wrestling match was a good measuring stick for Winters Mill and host Owings Mills. For one, it was a step in the right direction. For another, maybe a little hiccup. The visiting Falcons (1-3) fell behind early but rallied to win 11 consecutive matches to defeat the No. 11 Eagles (3-2), 49-24. Both teams dropped matches to Leonardtown (14-1) before facing each other. "What you saw tonight were two historically strong teams in a rebuilding mode," said Winters Mill coach John Lowe, whose team won the Class 2A-1A state title last year.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 13, 2013
Some long-gone oysters from prehistoric times are going to play a role in restoring the Chesapeake Bay's current crop of bivalves. Maryland has purchased 112,500 tons of fossilized oyster shells for $6.3 million from a quarry in the panhandle of Florida, officials announced Friday. The first 25-car trainload has been offloaded into barges in Baltimore for the last leg of its journey to Harris Creek , a tidal Eastern Shore water way targeted by the state for an ambitious effort to replenish the bay's depleted oyster population.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
At the Swan and Dolphin Resort during this week's winter meetings, there are a lot of baseball experts talking about talent, resorting to on-base percentage and WAR to evaluate value. But how do you measure chemistry? How does having a good clubhouse guy improve your team and your ability to win on the field? And how do you rebound when you lose one? That's one of the questions facing Orioles manager Buck Showalter right now after the club traded closer Jim Johnson to the Oakland Athletics last week and also lost outfielder Nate McLouth and right-hander Scott Feldman to free agency.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 4, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- As Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Kuwaiti ambassador put their signatures on an agreement yesterday giving Maryland companies preferential treatment in supplying goods and services for the reconstruction of war-torn Kuwait, businesses around the state were already negotiating to cash in on the accord.One of them is McNamara Fabricators Inc., a Baltimore plate and structural steel company. Charles W. Thomas Jr., McNamara's president, said that the company is bidding on a $30 million order that would be its largest contract in 10 or 15 years.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - It is 1 o'clock on a Thursday afternoon at the gates to the State Enterprise for Electrical Industries, and the workers have gone home. What about the managers? Out. Is even one technician left inside? The guards shake their heads: Of course not. Granted, it's 110 degrees outside, and the weekend - Friday in Iraq - is just around the corner. But knocking off work early is routine in postwar Baghdad. At the sprawling plant, the day begins at 9 a.m., and the workers who do show up are out the door by noon.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
When Joe Flacco takes his first snap Sunday, he will line up behind a left tackle who 10 weeks ago was toiling away in Jacksonville, a left guard who has already made as many stops as an Amtrak train, and a center who two years ago was blocking small-school defensive tackles. The Ravens are starting just two of the offensive linemen who protected Flacco so well during their run to the Super Bowl last winter. One retired in the offseason. Another was traded in October. And one was placed on injured reserve last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Casi Dow and For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Phew! They did it!  They survived week one of "Top Chef," Season 11. Chef Patty was crying over the experience, which didn't win her any points in chef Stephanie's book -- she insisted  she'll only cry when she is kicked off. Hmm, foreshadowing? Let's start a tally now of how many times either chef Patty or Chef Stephanie cries. So far, the score is 1-0. Time to open the bottles of real wine (not cooking wine), pour a glass, kick back and revel in their awesomeness.
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