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By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 1998
THIS MONTH, WHILE Americans anxiously watched news accounts of the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, Jerry and Lillie Rebert and their daughters Jill, 16, Heather, 12, and Leah, 9, left their Westminster home to spend two years as missionaries for Africa Inland Mission International.Four years ago, the family spent one summer helping families in Kenya and Tanzania, and they had been working toward returning."You don't go this far to stop," Jerry Rebert said after the bombings.
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NEWS
September 3, 2005
On September 1, 2005, J. OWINGS, husband of E. Doris (nee Brehm) Rebert; father and father-in-law of Carl J. and Tracey S. Rebert and Deanna R. and Dr. Frederick L. Stevens, Jr.; brother of Mary A. Brown. Also survived by five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Services Tuesday, 2 P.M. at MYERS-DURBORAW FUNERAL HOME, 91 Willis Street, Westminster. Burial in St. John's (Leisters) Cemetery, Westminster. Friends may call on both Sunday and Monday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the funeral home.
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NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Darren M. Allen and Amy L. Miller contributed to this article | March 8, 1994
Financial woes follow R. Leon Rebert, owner of the Havilah Inn in Taneytown, as several area businesses claim that he bounced checks, reneged on contracts and failed to pay for goods and services in the past few years.According to records in Carroll District Court, companies including Carroll County Foods Inc. in New Windsor and Cranberry Graphics in Westminster have filed suits seeking reimbursement.Mr. Rebert also faces the foreclosure of his restaurant by the Taneytown Bank, which plans to auction the Havilah Inn on March 28, and accusations by former employees that their paychecks bounced.
NEWS
October 6, 2004
On October 4, 2004, VERONICA T. (nee Fold); loving wife of the late Allen W. Rebert; dear mother of Ann Brooksbank and her husband Walt; cherished grandmother of Bob Brooksbank and his wife Roberta, Teri Moss and her husband Charlie, Tim Brooksbank and Rev. Kevin Brooksbank. The family will receive friends in the Lemmon Funeral Home of Dulaney Valley, Inc., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road), Timonium-Cockeysville, on Thursday, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., with a Vigil at 8 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the St. Joseph's Church, Cockeysville, on Friday, October 8, at 10 A.M. Interment Druid Ridge Cemetery.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
A carpenter, a nurse and their three children will carry tools, health supplies and friendship from Carroll County to missions in Africa this summer."We want to be a shot in the arm to them," said Jerry Rebert, 41.Although the family luggage will "go to the max" weight limit on the way to Kenya, their first stop of a two-nation visit, little of what they carry will come home, said Lillie Rebert."
NEWS
March 11, 1993
Hanover Pike study to be presentedThe results of a yearlong study of problems on Hanover Pike will be presented tonight at a meeting of the Hanover Pike Task Force at 7:30 p.m. at Manchester Elementary School.The report will review traffic conditions, accident tallies, bottlenecks and projected changes in population and land use in the area, said Jephrey Rebert, transportation planner with the York County (Pa.) Planning Commission.Mr. Rebert said the study will include projections to the year 2010.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
Last week's frigid temperatures took their toll on the Havilah Inn over the weekend, the inn's owner said yesterday.The popular restaurant and bar west of Taneytown was forced to close Friday afternoon because pipes in the building had frozen, said owner R. Leon Rebert."
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Amy L. Miller contributed to this story | March 25, 1994
The Taneytown Bank and Trust Company bought the Havilah Inn yesterday.The bank was trying to auction the Taneytown restaurant to pay off the mortgage the bank holds on the property.About 30 people watched as the 15-year-old establishment was sold for $340,000 to the bank -- the only bidder."The bank bid $200,000, then we took a recess to discuss how we were going to proceed with the auction," said Charles E. Stoner, the bank's attorney, who acted as a substitute trustee for the bank during the sale.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | September 18, 1994
Among hundreds of snapshots from an adventure-filled summer in Africa, the Reberts' favorite has all five family members standing on the equator."We were right in the middle of the world," said Heather Rebert, 8, pointing to the "equator" sign.The pose was one brief moment in two months dedicated to helping needy residents of Kenya and Tanzania. The family returned home to Westminster nearly empty-handed but full of enthusiasm for the work it had done and the work that missionary friends are continuing.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
Employees at Random House Inc. on Hahn Road will be taking voluntaryweeklong layoffs during May and June, the personnel director said.Every year at this time, the work load for warehouse employees slows down, said William Gavin. It picks up again after July 4, he said."The Christmas rush begins in July," Gavin said.Random House stores books and distributes them around the world. The company has about 1,200 workers.During May, about 80 employees will be laid off each week, he said. The number of employees to be laid off in June has not been determined yet, he said.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1998
EVER SINCE Jerry and Lillie Rebert and their children, Jill, Heather and Leah, left for Kenya in August they have been writing letters and sending e-mail to folks in Carroll County about the thrills and frustrations of their missionary work in Africa.Their notes are a gentle reminder that no matter how tough our days may get or how tight the household budget might be, we have so much to be thankful for."Food is expensive. A box of cereal is about $5; a can of deodorant is $10," Lillie Rebert wrote last month.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1998
MORE HOMEWORK, no television, high prices and American news told from a Kenyan perspective -- these are some of the changes Jerry, Lillie, Jill, Heather and Leah Rebert have experienced since they arrived in Kijabe as missionaries for Africa Inland Mission International.The girls attend Rift Valley Academy, a boarding school for missionary children where Jerry and Lillie work.Throughout their stay, family members have kept in touch by e-mail.Jerry recently wrote: "Greetings from Kijabe. Life here in Kenya brings many changes to the Rebert family.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 1998
THIS MONTH, WHILE Americans anxiously watched news accounts of the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, Jerry and Lillie Rebert and their daughters Jill, 16, Heather, 12, and Leah, 9, left their Westminster home to spend two years as missionaries for Africa Inland Mission International.Four years ago, the family spent one summer helping families in Kenya and Tanzania, and they had been working toward returning."You don't go this far to stop," Jerry Rebert said after the bombings.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin and Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Mike Farabaugh and Jacques Kelly contributed to this article | August 9, 1998
Families from Westminster and Bel Air plan to leave today for mission work in Kenya -- despite the bombing late last week of the United States embassy in the African country.On Friday, the State Department issued travel advisories to U.S. citizens planning trips to Kenya and to Tanzania, where the embassy also was bombed. It also urged nonessential U.S. personnel to leave the countries."Like many people, we're praying this doesn't affect our trip," said Jerry Rebert, a Westminster resident who is leaving his construction job to spend two years as a missionary for Africa Inland Mission International.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin and Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Mike Farabaugh and Jacques Kelly contributed to this article | August 9, 1998
Families from Westminster and Bel Air plan to leave today for mission work in Kenya -- despite the bombing late last week of the United States embassy in the African country.On Friday, the State Department issued travel advisories to U.S. citizens planning trips to Kenya and to Tanzania, where the embassy also was bombed. It also urged nonessential U.S. personnel to leave the countries."Like many people, we're praying this doesn't affect our trip," said Jerry Rebert, a Westminster resident who is leaving his construction job to spend two years as a missionary for Africa Inland Mission International.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | September 18, 1994
Among hundreds of snapshots from an adventure-filled summer in Africa, the Reberts' favorite has all five family members standing on the equator."We were right in the middle of the world," said Heather Rebert, 8, pointing to the "equator" sign.The pose was one brief moment in two months dedicated to helping needy residents of Kenya and Tanzania. The family returned home to Westminster nearly empty-handed but full of enthusiasm for the work it had done and the work that missionary friends are continuing.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin and Sheridan Lyons and Lisa Breslin,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Mike Farabaugh and Jacques Kelly contributed to this article | August 9, 1998
Families from Westminster and Bel Air plan to leave today for mission work in Kenya -- despite the bombing late last week of the United States embassy in the African country.On Friday, the State Department issued travel advisories to U.S. citizens planning trips to Kenya and to Tanzania, where the embassy also was bombed. It also urged nonessential U.S. personnel to leave the countries."Like many people, we're praying this doesn't affect our trip," said Jerry Rebert, a Westminster resident who is leaving his construction job to spend two years as a missionary for Africa Inland Mission International.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 21, 1991
YORK, Pa. -- For some time, Valerie L. Gamboa-Taylor had been planning to end her marriage to Paul E. Gamboa-Taylor, friends and neighbors say. They had been fighting frequently.She moved out a few months ago but came back. Friday night, she stormed out of the house after a fight, according to one neighbor, and returned about noon Saturday. It was the last time she was seen alive.Saturday evening, city police in York found the bodies of Mrs. Gamboa-Taylor, 23, and two of her children, her mother and a 2-year-old half-brother in the family's blood-spattered apartment in a row house neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
A carpenter, a nurse and their three children will carry tools, health supplies and friendship from Carroll County to missions in Africa this summer."We want to be a shot in the arm to them," said Jerry Rebert, 41.Although the family luggage will "go to the max" weight limit on the way to Kenya, their first stop of a two-nation visit, little of what they carry will come home, said Lillie Rebert."
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
And now we come to Havilah Inn -- Joe has found his place!He's proud as is his right to be -- He's earned his happy face!Come sit by the fire in the Trophy Room. Come have a little cheer.Hospitality and good friends are on the menu here. Bonnie Fitzgerald remembered the poem -- written by a friend of her mother-in-law's -- that hung on the wall to greet guests of the Havilah Inn during the 15 years she and her husband, Joe, owned the restaurant.While she has only happy memories of the place, Mrs. Fitzgerald feels that recent events involving the Havilah Inn -- its closing and sale by a bank -- have written a sad chapter to what the Fitzgeralds heralded as their fairy tale come true.
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