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NEWS
February 28, 2013
I was pleased to read your recent article regarding the lawsuit against Ticketmaster ("City politicians rush to save Ticketmaster's user fees," Feb. 24). I now know who to thank: Kudos to Andre Bourgeois for bringing the suit and winning the case. I attend many productions in Baltimore, be they at the Meyerhoff, the Lyric or elsewhere around town. But I will never go to any event unless I can buy a ticket at the box office. Every company is entitled to make a profit for its services, but the exorbitant fees tacked onto tickets by Ticketmaster, which I refuse to pay, are pure gouging.
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NEWS
By Sidney Rocke | May 5, 2014
The recent passage of Maryland's Marijuana Decriminalization Bill was an act of rebellion. Not against society's norms, but against one man: House Judiciary Chairman Joseph Vallario. The bill easily passed the Senate and had overwhelming support from the Democratic Party. Yet Delegate Vallario, a Prince George's Democrat, essentially killed it by amending the bill to merely set up a task force to study the issue for the next two years. The original bill was resurrected and passed with minor amendments after a rebellion from a coalition ranging from the Black Caucus to conservative Libertarians, outraged at the sheer wastefulness of criminal prosecution for minor marijuana violations.
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NEWS
October 4, 1990
That jarring sound you hear from Washington is the Republican Party splintering along its political fault lines: Reaganite supply-siders versus Hooverite budget-balancers; Lindbergh isolationists versus Vandenberg internationalists.The issues of the moment are the bipartisan budget compromise and the U.S. military intervention in the Persian Gulf, both of which have forced President Bush to prescribe bitter medicine that may bring an end to his happy ride high in the popular approval charts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
One of the delights of summer is the HBO documentary series executive producer Sheila Nevins delivers. I have only seen the first two films this year, but I like them both. I love "Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer," which launches the series at 9 tonight. It's a look inside the feminist Russian art collective, its "Punk Prayer" protest in a Moscow cathedral and the trial that followed. The film reminded me as nothing else has in the last 40 some years what it felt like to be 18 years old in 1968 and hear the siren call of a cultural revolution.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 6, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- It was a quiet day in the rebel camp yesterday.It is a quiet day in the rebel camp every day.There is never a doubt about what is going to happen.The Orioles are going to win. And the Orioles are going to lose.Undertaking a rebellion is supposed to provide thrills of a sort, of course. Ask any teen-ager about it. You take a stand. You get someone mad at you. At the very least, you feel some tingling in your toes.But there are no tingles for the rebels in baseball's war, whom you know as the Orioles.
NEWS
By Elaine Sciolino and Elaine Sciolino,New York Times News Service | March 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Ever since Iraq became a nation in 1921, its Kurdish population has been engaged in an almost constant rebellion for some degree of autonomy against the government in Baghdad.In recent weeks, the Kurds have made extraordinary military gains against the government of President Saddam Hussein, seizing most of the territory that makes up Iraqi Kurdistan, including the crucial oil center of Kirkuk.Jalal Talabani, leader of one of two principal Iraqi Kurdish groups, returned triumphantly Tuesday to Zakho, a Kurdish city in northern Iraq, after three years in exile.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | September 8, 1998
A new book by an amateur psychologist titled "The Nurture Assumption: Why Children Turn Out the Way They Do" arrived in bookstores this month, and it has the potential to explode like hand grenade in the uneasy lives of parents who are trying to raise teen-agers.Judith Rich Harris is a grandmother and a textbook writer from suburban New Jersey whose lupus-like illness has kept her homebound for many years. She has no academic affiliation and has done no original research, yet her book has received national media attention.
NEWS
By Ian Katz and Ian Katz,Special to The Sun | December 5, 1990
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- Depending on whom you ask, what happened Monday in Argentina was either a coup attempt or an internal military dispute.The rebel army soldiers who seized the army chief of staff headquarters and three other key installations before surrendering insist that they respect the democratic government of President Carlos Menem. They say they just want a restructured military and for their inspirational leader to be named army chief.But Mr. Menem didn't buy that assessment.
NEWS
By JOEL KOTKIN | June 17, 1992
Beyond its human and material costs, the Los Angeles riots left behind a residue of dangerous myths and attitudes. Left unchallenged, these myths could pave the way for a descent into a future of ceaseless racial and class strife and widening economic impoverishment.The politically correct myth makers portray the riots as naturally occurring events, even as justifiable expressions of anger and despair. In their eyes, Los Angeles is a city of separate ethnic groups, the most aggrieved of which can protest their grievances without fear of punishment or moral censure.
NEWS
June 30, 1999
ABDULLAH Ocalan, who led the separatist Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) for 21 years and its violent rebellion for 15, would be convicted in any country, under any legal system. As it happened, he was condemned to death for treason in an extraordinary trial in his own country, Turkey, to which he was kidnapped from exile.That Ocalan is a mass terrorist is beyond dispute. So is his standing as a freedom fighter for oppressed people.Almost immediately, yesterday, foreign governments protested his death sentence.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
I was pleased to read your recent article regarding the lawsuit against Ticketmaster ("City politicians rush to save Ticketmaster's user fees," Feb. 24). I now know who to thank: Kudos to Andre Bourgeois for bringing the suit and winning the case. I attend many productions in Baltimore, be they at the Meyerhoff, the Lyric or elsewhere around town. But I will never go to any event unless I can buy a ticket at the box office. Every company is entitled to make a profit for its services, but the exorbitant fees tacked onto tickets by Ticketmaster, which I refuse to pay, are pure gouging.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 24, 2011
As we watch rebellion roll through the Middle East and in Wisconsin — propelled by Facebook and Twitter — parents have to be wondering what their own kids are up to about now. Considering the amount of time our children spend on their social networks — and how removed those conversations are from our prying eyes — they could be fomenting revolution right under our noses and we, like the oppressive oligarchs teetering all...
NEWS
By Richard A. Viguerie | May 12, 2009
Two major debates face conservative Republicans about the future of the party. The first, rekindled by Sen. Arlen Specter's switch to the Democratic Party, is whether the GOP should move further leftward. The second is whether conservatives should tone down their advocacy on social issues. History is on the side of outspoken conservatives in both debates. GOP establishment leaders are incapable of understanding the problem - it's them. The ascendancy of conservatives to power was done by boat-rockers, not establishment politicians.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 2008
BAIJI, Iraq -- The Baiji refinery may be the most important industrial site in the Sunni Arab-dominated regions of Iraq. On a good day, 500 tanker trucks will leave the refinery filled with fuel with a street value of $10 million. The sea of oil under Iraq is supposed to rebuild the nation and then make it prosper. But at least one-third, and possibly much more, of the fuel from Iraq's largest refinery is diverted to the black market, according to U.S. military officials. Tankers are hijacked, drivers are bribed, papers are forged and meters are manipulated - and some of the earnings go to insurgents who are still killing more than 100 Iraqis a week.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | February 6, 2008
N'DJAMENA, Chad -- A rebellion aimed at toppling Chad's president appeared to falter yesterday as France declared that it would intervene to protect the Chadian government if called upon, and a Darfur rebel group with close ties to the Chadian government said it had sent troops to help bolster the president, Idriss Deby. French military officials in Chad said the rebels were far from N'Djamena, the capital, and the streets of the city were quiet. For the first time since the weekend, the sound of automatic gunfire disappeared.
FEATURES
August 23, 2007
Aug. 23 1775 Britain's King George III proclaimed the American Colonies in a state of "open and avowed rebellion." 1914 Japan declared war against Germany in World War I.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 17, 1997
What is it about popular music that lends itself so readily to a culture of violence?Parents have pondered that question since the mid-'50s, when teens rioted to the strains of "Rock Around the Clock." But it has become especially pertinent in recent months.In rap, fans have been shaken and critics disturbed by the drive-by murders of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, a.k.a. the Notorious B.I.G. In rock, parents have been so upset by the sexual content of Marilyn Manson's act that there have been attempts in several states to stop the group from performing -- including a well-publicized effort on the part of Oklahoma governor Frank Keating.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 12, 1997
BUTRINT, Albania -- Ani Tare stands beside the Venetian castle overlooking the remains of a Greek and Roman town. Birds swoop over wetlands. A shepherd guides his flock of sheep across a rutted mountain that meets a cloudless sky."Everyone wants a piece of this place," says Tare, a guide and proponent of environmentally friendly tourism. "They want to turn this into a tourist town."Tourism? In Albania?Albania is on the verge of civil war, with more than a third of the country controlled by anti-government forces.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Staff | January 28, 2007
At a mandatory study hall for about 25 Towson University freshmen last semester, teaching assistant Dorothy Williams repeatedly implored several male students in the back of the classroom to stop joking around and settle down. Moments later, in response to a perceived slight, one of the troublemakers stood and struck a fellow student --- hard --- in the back. Several students laughed. A clearly rattled Williams ordered the assailant to leave the room and "cool off" by the door. "They're usually very well behaved," she insisted later, her voice still shaking.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE AND SARA NEUFELD and JOHN FRITZE AND SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTERS | April 7, 2006
While Democrats across Maryland have largely coalesced behind a plan to block the state's takeover of 11 Baltimore schools, a handful of their colleagues on the City Council are beginning to rebel. Though their opinions vary on the takeover, and the General Assembly's proposed moratorium, some council members said yesterday that they have reservations with their party's reaction. Among the most outspoken is Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., chairman of the taxation committee. Mitchell said he believes a one-year moratorium would be useful only if it is approved in tandem with a plan to fix the schools.
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