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NEWS
June 19, 1994
As grand rabbi of the ultra-orthodox Jewish sect known as the Lubavitch Hasidim, Menachem Schneerson exercised influence out of all proportion to the size of his following -- some 200,000 faithful centered on the group's world headquarters in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn in New York City. When he died last week, at age 92, he was a larger than life figure even in death.Many of Rabbi Schneerson's followers continue to fervently believe he was the Messiah whose return is foretold in the Bible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur M. Lesley and Arthur M. Lesley,Special to the Sun | August 21, 2005
NOVEL THE TIME OF THE UPROOTED By Elie Wiesel, translated by David Hapgood. Alfred A. Knopf. 320 pages. The Time of the Uprooted is Elie Wiesel's 13th novel since Night, his stunning memoir of Auschwitz that helped to establish Holocaust literature in Western languages. Wiesel's strongest novels confronted acute moral problems that the Holocaust made urgent. The Gates of the Forest, The Town Beyond the Wall and Dawn were taut and innovative, in the early '60's, when they subordinated the events and feelings to an intellectual struggle with new varieties of perversity.
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NEWS
By Newsday | February 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- The boiling pot of the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, long one of the city's most racially turbulent zones for blacks and Jews, has been spiced with a new ingredient: a surge in messianic fervor.Followers of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, 90, gathered last night for what they hoped would be a coronation -- the recognition by God that their ailing leader had become "Ha Mosiach," the King Messiah.But they were to be disappointed. The arrival of the messiah and the commencement of eternal peace had been postponed again.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
Lubavitch Center is sponsoring a running group The Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education will sponsor a Sunday morning running group, meeting weekly with Rabbi Hillel Baron at 7:30 a.m. at the center, 770 Howes Lane, Columbia. The group aims to boost spiritual and physical energy with readings from meditations of the Lubavitcher Rebbe and a three-mile run. The pace will be about 12 minutes a mile, Rabbi Baron said. There is no cost. All-night Torah study, a traditional part of the celebration of the holiday of Shavuot, commemorating the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, will be held from 11:30 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. Monday at the center.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
When he was age 4, Hillel Moshe Baron went with his father to see the Lubavitcher rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, in New York, a common thing for Hasidic Lubavitch Jews seeking his guidance.When the boy turned 13, his father took him to see the rebbe again, this time for his bar mitzvah. And although the rabbi had counseled thousands of visitors daily, he had not forgotten the youngster he had met nine years earlier."He addressed himself to me without any introduction," he said, adding that others had often confused him with his younger brother.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 11, 1998
Starr just knocked health care, the economy, the stock market, Russia and the budget out of the election. Way to go!In parlous times, America's new spiritual leader is Cardinal McGwire of St. Louis.Greenspan says more raising an eyebrow than anyone since the Lubavitcher rebbe.Rupert Murdoch will merge Manchester United with the LA Dodgers. At last we will see home runs kicked and headed.Pub Date: 9/11/98
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
NEW YORK -- To tens of thousands of Lubavitcher Jews around the world, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson was more than their "rebbe," their teacher. They believed he could be the messiah.They believed he had all the characteristics of the messiah as described in Jewish law: a living, breathing person who toils over his learning of the Torah; who strives to perform good deeds; someone who leads people to glorify and recommit themselves to Jewish traditions."The more you knew him, the more respect you had, the more in awe you were, the more you realize that there is so much there that you will never understand," says Rabbi Zalman Shmotkin, a spokesman at the Lubavitcher headquarters, in Brooklyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur M. Lesley and Arthur M. Lesley,Special to the Sun | August 21, 2005
NOVEL THE TIME OF THE UPROOTED By Elie Wiesel, translated by David Hapgood. Alfred A. Knopf. 320 pages. The Time of the Uprooted is Elie Wiesel's 13th novel since Night, his stunning memoir of Auschwitz that helped to establish Holocaust literature in Western languages. Wiesel's strongest novels confronted acute moral problems that the Holocaust made urgent. The Gates of the Forest, The Town Beyond the Wall and Dawn were taut and innovative, in the early '60's, when they subordinated the events and feelings to an intellectual struggle with new varieties of perversity.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Their messiah is dying.They are praying for a miracle.In a seventh-floor corner-room of Beth Israel Medical Center is a 91-year-old man who has suffered his second stroke in two years and is now tethered to a respirator.Across the street in Stuyvesant Park, are several hundred men dressed in black hats, black coats and black shoes. Nearly all have thick beards and carry leather-bound prayer books. They follow an Orthodox Jewish tradition of prayer, the men standing on one side of the blue police barricades, separating themselves from the women.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- A 28-year-old man described as a Lebanese national was arrested and charged in the Brooklyn Bridge gunfire attack on four Hasidic students and charged with attempted murder yesterday after a swift investigation significantly aided by citizens who alerted police about the suspect's attempt to flee and hide.The arrest of the suspect, identified as Rashad Baz, and the confiscation of an assortment of loaded semiautomatic weapons was announced by Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in exultant tones at a City Hall news conference.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 11, 1998
Starr just knocked health care, the economy, the stock market, Russia and the budget out of the election. Way to go!In parlous times, America's new spiritual leader is Cardinal McGwire of St. Louis.Greenspan says more raising an eyebrow than anyone since the Lubavitcher rebbe.Rupert Murdoch will merge Manchester United with the LA Dodgers. At last we will see home runs kicked and headed.Pub Date: 9/11/98
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
NEW YORK -- To tens of thousands of Lubavitcher Jews around the world, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson was more than their "rebbe," their teacher. They believed he could be the messiah.They believed he had all the characteristics of the messiah as described in Jewish law: a living, breathing person who toils over his learning of the Torah; who strives to perform good deeds; someone who leads people to glorify and recommit themselves to Jewish traditions."The more you knew him, the more respect you had, the more in awe you were, the more you realize that there is so much there that you will never understand," says Rabbi Zalman Shmotkin, a spokesman at the Lubavitcher headquarters, in Brooklyn.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
When he was age 4, Hillel Moshe Baron went with his father to see the Lubavitcher rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, in New York, a common thing for Hasidic Lubavitch Jews seeking his guidance.When the boy turned 13, his father took him to see the rebbe again, this time for his bar mitzvah. And although the rabbi had counseled thousands of visitors daily, he had not forgotten the youngster he had met nine years earlier."He addressed himself to me without any introduction," he said, adding that others had often confused him with his younger brother.
NEWS
June 19, 1994
As grand rabbi of the ultra-orthodox Jewish sect known as the Lubavitch Hasidim, Menachem Schneerson exercised influence out of all proportion to the size of his following -- some 200,000 faithful centered on the group's world headquarters in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn in New York City. When he died last week, at age 92, he was a larger than life figure even in death.Many of Rabbi Schneerson's followers continue to fervently believe he was the Messiah whose return is foretold in the Bible.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Their messiah is dying.They are praying for a miracle.In a seventh-floor corner-room of Beth Israel Medical Center is a 91-year-old man who has suffered his second stroke in two years and is now tethered to a respirator.Across the street in Stuyvesant Park, are several hundred men dressed in black hats, black coats and black shoes. Nearly all have thick beards and carry leather-bound prayer books. They follow an Orthodox Jewish tradition of prayer, the men standing on one side of the blue police barricades, separating themselves from the women.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- A 28-year-old man described as a Lebanese national was arrested and charged in the Brooklyn Bridge gunfire attack on four Hasidic students and charged with attempted murder yesterday after a swift investigation significantly aided by citizens who alerted police about the suspect's attempt to flee and hide.The arrest of the suspect, identified as Rashad Baz, and the confiscation of an assortment of loaded semiautomatic weapons was announced by Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in exultant tones at a City Hall news conference.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- The boiling pot of the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, long one of the city's most racially turbulent zones for blacks and Jews, has been spiced with a new ingredient: a surge in messianic fervor.Followers of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, 90, gathered last night for what they hoped would be a coronation -- the recognition by God that their ailing leader had become "Ha Mosiach," the King Messiah.But they were to be disappointed. The arrival of the messiah and the commencement of eternal peace had been postponed again.
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