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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Pickings look pretty slim throughout the day but pick up late tonight, when TBS airs one of the greatest comedies of the 1970s. See if it reminds you of your college days."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 15, 2004
The twang is unmistakable, the voice friendly and bell-like. "Yep, this is Reba McEntire. How are you?" The country music queen and sitcom star is calling from her Nashville home, kicking back before heading out on her summer tour. Already solidly established in the music industry with 25 years invested and more than 40 million records sold, the fiery redhead, who plays 1st Mariner Arena Saturday night, has officially made it in prime time. Reba, her WB show, has just wrapped up its third season.
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NEWS
August 22, 1999
Move over, Oprah. Now Reba has a book club -- and a role in a national literacy organization.Country singer Reba McEntire has become national spokeswoman for First Book, a Washington-based nonprofit organization that works with local literacy groups to provide new books and tutoring to needy children.Along with that role, there is Reba's First Book Club, a national program intended to "encourage children and their families to discover the magic of books, as well as help raise funds to buy new books for homeless and disadvantaged children across America."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | June 17, 2004
Reba McEntire / 1st Mariner She's one of the most successful women in country who's winning respect and rave reviews as the star of her own sitcom on the WB. Reba McEntire plays 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $27.50-$65 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.com. Eric Clapton / MCI Center Eric Clapton keeps the blues-rock flame burning Monday night at 7:30. Tickets are $53-$85 and are available through Ticketmaster.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
Twenty-nine gun owners traded their revolvers, shotguns and rifles to Baltimore County police yesterday for tickets to country western star Reba McEntire's concert in Baltimore next month.Ms. McEntire offered the tickets to the concert, scheduled April 10 at the Baltimore Arena, to the first 100 people who turned in guns to Baltimore County police through her "tickets for guns" program.The 29 firearms -- plus a hand grenade -- were dropped off at the annex of county police headquarters on Kenilworth Avenue in Towson, said police Capt.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 11, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- If anyone knows when to hold 'em and fold 'em, it's Kenny Rogers.Who else could have taken one popular song, "The Gambler," and parlayed it into four successful miniseries?The latest installment, "The Luck of the Draw: The Gambler Continues," arrives this fall on NBC and this time Mr. Rogers' is playing his biggest hand yet, bringing in Reba McEntire.Ms. McEntire is probably the hottest country-western artist in the country right now (she will perform at the Pier Six Concert Pavilion on Friday)
FEATURES
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1997
Country music roadshows tend to come in two types -- exceptional and mediocre -- and with the current diversification of the genre, most of them fall into the latter category. Fortunately, those attending the first of the two-night Baltimore Arena residency for Brooks & Dunn and Reba McEntire were greeted with an in-the-round performance that transcended excellence."Are we doin' OK so far?" McEntire asked the sold-out crowd, and the audience, already drained from the rambunctious antics of opening act Brooks & Dunn, managed to muster a "yeah" rousing enough to be heard back in Nashville.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 26, 1994
Bad love has been very good to Reba McEntire.Blessed with a voice that moves easily from a wounded-heart quaver to full he-done-me-wrong fury, she's a natural for songs about mismatched lovers, cheating spouses and unrequited passion. As a result, her albums boast more bad relationships than the average soap opera.But even by McEntire's usual standards of love-gone-sour, the songs on "Read My Mind" (MCA 10994, arriving in stores today) (( seem a tad extreme. Every song here, from the sassy "Why Haven't I Heard From You" to the maudlin "And Still," is built around a broken heart -- and while that may leave some listeners reaching for their hankies, it left me lunging for the eject button.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | June 17, 2004
Reba McEntire / 1st Mariner She's one of the most successful women in country who's winning respect and rave reviews as the star of her own sitcom on the WB. Reba McEntire plays 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $27.50-$65 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.com. Eric Clapton / MCI Center Eric Clapton keeps the blues-rock flame burning Monday night at 7:30. Tickets are $53-$85 and are available through Ticketmaster.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck Reba McEntire at Merriweather | August 30, 1992
British farce"See How They Run," a British farce whose cast of characters features a vicar, an American actress and a Russian spy, opens a five-weekend run Friday at the Colonial Players of Annapolis, 108 East St., Annapolis.Written by Philip King and focusing on a case of mistaken identity, the farce will be presented at 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and at 7 p.m. Sundays, with matinees at 2:30 p.m. Sept. 20 and 27, through Oct. 3. Tickets are $7 and $9. For more information, call (301)
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Move over, Oprah. Now Reba has a book club -- and a role in a national literacy organization.Country singer Reba McEntire has become national spokeswoman for First Book, a Washington-based nonprofit organization that works with local literacy groups to provide new books and tutoring to needy children.Along with that role, there is Reba's First Book Club, a national program intended to "encourage children and their families to discover the magic of books, as well as help raise funds to buy new books for homeless and disadvantaged children across America."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Alec Klein and Gerard Shields and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
What do you get when you cross a Reba McEntire concert, Pier 6 jazz show and the first football game in Ravens stadium? Potential for the traffic and parking nightmare of a lifetime.Baltimore officials say that without the help of patrons and fans, downtown could be twisted into a traffic pretzel Saturday night.The numbers tell the tale. About 69,000 fans are expected to pack Ravens stadium at Camden Yards for the 7: 30 p.m. exhibition season opener when the Baltimore Ravens play the Chicago Bears.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
For most people, looking at a catalytic converter doesn't bring thoughts of Chopin, a transaxle seems a long way from Tchaikovsky and a water pump isn't even close to Wagner.But they all come together at Johns Hopkins Texaco Service Center in Fulton. That's because every other Saturday, part-time mechanic Bob Trolinger works on cars while he blasts classical music from a small but powerful boombox at the service station on Johns Hopkins Road."It's soothing, inspiring, stirring," the 41-year-old Ellicott City resident says of the music playing in the service bay. "It puts me in a very good mood to do my work."
FEATURES
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1997
Country music roadshows tend to come in two types -- exceptional and mediocre -- and with the current diversification of the genre, most of them fall into the latter category. Fortunately, those attending the first of the two-night Baltimore Arena residency for Brooks & Dunn and Reba McEntire were greeted with an in-the-round performance that transcended excellence."Are we doin' OK so far?" McEntire asked the sold-out crowd, and the audience, already drained from the rambunctious antics of opening act Brooks & Dunn, managed to muster a "yeah" rousing enough to be heard back in Nashville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 19, 1996
Reba McEntireWhat If It's You (MCA 11500)It's tough, trying to square show-business ambition with the unaffected honesty of country music. Ever since Reba McEntire's albums began to make inroads into the pop market, her sound seemed to get slicker and her material more overwrought with each passing album. Maybe that's why "What If It's You" seems such a refreshing return. Although no one is going to mistake McEntire for Alison Krauss here, the songs no longer feel so pumped-up and calculated.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Pickings look pretty slim throughout the day but pick up late tonight, when TBS airs one of the greatest comedies of the 1970s. See if it reminds you of your college days."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 11, 1991
24 NIGHTSEric Clapton (Reprise 26420) Given the number of concert recordings already in his catalog, news that Eric Clapton has released another live album is hardly going to stop the presses. "24 Nights" isn't just another live album, though. Drawing from 24 concerts the guitarist gave at London's Royal Albert Hall in 1990 and '91, this double-length collection finds him working with a variety of bands, including the nine-piece group he toured with last year, an all-star blues group, even a symphony orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 17, 1993
SO FAR SO GOODBryan Adams (A&M 31454 0157) What does it say about Bryan Adams that his best songs have all been raucous, guitar-driven rockers, while his biggest hits have all been sappy, sentimental ballads? That he may seem a tough guy on the outside, but deep down he's just an old softie? Maybe, but the answer suggested by his greatest hits collection, "So Far So Good" is a little simpler: He's just not rough enough to be a convincing rock and roller. No matter how much Keith Richards-style guitar he pumps into "The Summer of '69" and "It's Only Love," his voice lacks the sly, Jaggeresque snarl that would make the music seem dangerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | October 5, 1995
Starting OverReba McEntire (MCA 11264)Imitation may be mere flattery elsewhere, but in the music world it's more often meant as a means of illuminating an artist's influences. That's part of the reason Reba McEntire recorded "Starting Over," a collection of songs she describes as having "influenced me, and ultimately the music I record." McEntire's selection of songs ranges from the expected, Crystal Gayle's "Talking In Your Sleep" and Linda Ronstadt's version of "You're No Good," to such out-of-left-field oldies as the Michael McDonald/Gladys Knight hit "On My Own," and "You Keep Me Hangin' On" by Diana Ross and the Supremes.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 6, 1994
Forget what you may have heard about the laid-back country lifestyle. If last night's broadcast of the 28th Country Music Association Awards show was any indication, life in Nashville is every bit as frenzied as it is in New York or Los Angeles.Packing more stars into three hours than any awards show in memory, the CMA Awards show had so much talent on display that they actually had people singing from their seats in the audience -- no time for set changes, apparently. As such, it was a great deal for those who just can't get enough of country music on TV.Or even on the radio, since WPOC's Laurie DeYoung was named Large Market Radio Personality of the Year.
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