Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReasonable Doubt
IN THE NEWS

Reasonable Doubt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- For two centuries, legions of American jurors have puzzled over what the judge meant by saying they could convict an individual of a crime only if they were convinced of guilt "beyond a reasonable doubt." Yesterday, the nine Supreme Court justices could not agree on the right meaning for that phrase.Amid repeated concessions by the justices that confusing definitions often are given by trial judges, the court expressed some qualms about those definitions but refused, in five separate opinions, to spell out clearly what the Constitution requires.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 13, 2013
Drawn from an old transcript, this is how a Baltimore judge instructed a jury before its deliberations in a murder trial in 1967: "You, under our system, in criminal cases are at liberty to disagree with the court's interpretation of the law. You shall determine what the law is and then apply the law to the facts as you find them to be. " Imagine being on that jury, invited to employ your vast legal knowledge in interpreting Maryland law in a...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,NEWSDAY | November 23, 2006
Jay-Z got it right the first time. When he "retired" in 2003, he strutted off the stage in near-perfection, with the stunning, powerful legacy-builder The Black Album and his equally on-point farewell concert at New York's Madison Square Garden memorialized in the movie Fade to Black. How could you top all that? Why would you even want to try? In his years of "retirement," Jay became President Carter, head of Def Jam Records. He made some high-profile appearances on singles from Beyonce, Rick Ross and Young Jeezy, as well as that hot "Dear Summer" freestyle he did on New York radio station Hot 97 last year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A Baltimore County man accused in a gang rape at a Woodlawn roller rink was acquitted Monday of the most serious charges against him. But Davon Perry faces two counts on which the judge declared a mistrial after members of the jury said they were "hopelessly deadlocked. " Perry, 26, who was living in Pikesville before he was arrested in August 2010, showed no emotion when the seven-woman, five-man jury announced the verdict after about eight hours of deliberation that began Friday in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
June 3, 1997
IN THOSE FIRST numb hours after a bomb destroyed a federal office building in Oklahoma City on the morning of April 19, 1995, killing 168 people, speculation inevitably turned toward an international terrorist conspiracy. Who else could wish such harm on so many direct victims, as well as on their families, their community and their country?Yesterday, a jury in Denver found beyond a reasonable doubt that the perpetrator of the worst act of domestic terrorism in United States history was not some shadowy international figure but rather a 29-year-old decorated veteran of the U.S. Army.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
ATLANTA - It's the kind of case prosecutors dread: a grisly multiple homicide committed well after midnight during a street brawl. Fists, knives and bullets flew. Glass shattered. And everybody took off before the police got there. Toss in drunken witnesses, dim lighting and some of the best - and costliest - legal defense talent in the South, and you get a sense of the challenge that confronts Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard and his team as they prosecute Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis and two co-defendants.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Reasonable doubt. It's the standard by which we are judged in the criminal courts in this country, but it's a standard that's neither easy to define nor easy for prosecutors to establish. Hung juries, like the one that failed to reach a verdict last week in the case of a suspected high ranking member of the Bloods street gang, are the hallmark of a legal system that struggles with what it means to have reasonable doubt. The fate of the defendant in this case remains an open question.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
The state's highest court has refused to review the reversal of a cocaine-distribution conviction of a Westminster man believed to be serving the longest prison sentence for drug dealing ever handed down in a Carroll County court.Without comment, the Court of Appeals last week declined to review Noland Maurice Rheubottom's case. Earlier this year, the Court of Special Appeals reversed Rheubottom's cocaine distribution conviction of Jan. 20, 1993, his third in four years.That court said Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. failed to instruct the jury about incorrect statements made by a county prosecutor in his closing arguments.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1994
Lester V. Jones, the prominent Bel Air attorney who served about six months of an 18-month sentence after a 1992 conviction on income tax evasion charges, says he is trapped between federal and state laws governing trial instructions on "beyond reasonable doubt."Because of his conviction, which is under appeal, Mr. Jones no longer can practice law in Maryland.Mr. Jones, 61, is a former Baltimore County prosecutor who served in the House of Delegates from 1966 to 1975 before opening his practice in Harford County.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- After 14 years, Joyce Danna may get another chance to prove that her husband's death was an accident, not murder.Mrs. Danna, 42, was sentenced to life in prison in 1978 after being convicted by a Baltimore County jury in the Dec. 11, 1977, fatal shooting of her husband, Louis J. Danna, a 30-year-old Baltimore police officer.She testified during her trial that the officer's .38-caliber service revolver discharged while she was handing it to him.Friday, the Court of Special Appeals overturned her conviction, ruling that the trial judge improperly instructed the jury before it began to deliberate.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Reasonable doubt. It's the standard by which we are judged in the criminal courts in this country, but it's a standard that's neither easy to define nor easy for prosecutors to establish. Hung juries, like the one that failed to reach a verdict last week in the case of a suspected high ranking member of the Bloods street gang, are the hallmark of a legal system that struggles with what it means to have reasonable doubt. The fate of the defendant in this case remains an open question.
NEWS
By Diane Bell-McKoy, Mark Fetting, Tom Wilcox | July 3, 2011
The uphill path of progress is rarely charted in a straight line. Last week's news that test scores for city students declined, in contrast to steady gains over the prior three years, does not detract from our confidence in the direction of Baltimore City Public Schools — and it should not detract from yours. Test scores are one part of our measurement of school quality and progress, but we also see ample evidence pointing to a school system that is deeply committed to student improvement and to delivering real results.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 27, 2011
They picked me for a jury in the Circuit Court for Baltimore, Judge John Carroll Byrnes presiding. It was an attempted murder case: A young fellow named Bradley, also known as Doo Wop, allegedly stabbed another young fellow named Massey in a drunken fight over a woman named Jones, supposedly the "baby mother" of the defendant. This happened early on Friday, March 26 last year, on East 34th Street near Ellerslie Avenue in northeast Baltimore. Only one witness to the incident testified during the trial, and that was Mr. Massey, the victim.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,NEWSDAY | November 23, 2006
Jay-Z got it right the first time. When he "retired" in 2003, he strutted off the stage in near-perfection, with the stunning, powerful legacy-builder The Black Album and his equally on-point farewell concert at New York's Madison Square Garden memorialized in the movie Fade to Black. How could you top all that? Why would you even want to try? In his years of "retirement," Jay became President Carter, head of Def Jam Records. He made some high-profile appearances on singles from Beyonce, Rick Ross and Young Jeezy, as well as that hot "Dear Summer" freestyle he did on New York radio station Hot 97 last year.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2004
NEW YORK - A federal judge dismissed yesterday the most serious charge against Martha Stewart, an accusation of securities fraud, but left four other charges in place. The decision was made known just days before the case against Stewart is expected to go to the jury. The fraud charge accused Stewart of deceiving investors in her company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Inc., by lying about the reasons for her sale of stock in ImClone Systems Inc. in 2001. Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum of U.S. District Court in Manhattan left intact charges of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and two counts of lying to investigators.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
A judge has ruled that former Carroll County schools Superintendent William H. Hyde will have the chance to argue in court that he should get a new trial because evidence presented at last month's trial did not support his conviction in the rape and sexual child abuse of an elementary school-age girl. Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. scheduled the hearing for next week after attorneys for the former schools chief argued in written court filings that the child's testimony contradicted the medical findings of the forensic pediatrician who examined her, and that the judge's characterization of the case as "close" shows that the prosecution did not prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt.
NEWS
December 4, 1991
We have the uneasy feeling that the William Kennedy Smith rape trial which opened this week in Florida will be a tawdry spectacle that ends as an exercise in futility.Were it not for the prominence of the individual on trial, the case would rate only brief stories in the local newspapers. But because of Smith's prominence, the trial no doubt will go down as a landmark case in the phenomenon called "date rape" -- a term meaning the sexual assault of a woman by a man she has willingly accompanied as opposed to an unknown assailant.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
The retrial of a Westminster man serving the longest prison sentence for drug dealing ever handed down in Carroll promises to be an education into the life of a drug dealer, State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes told a Carroll Circuit Court jury yesterday."
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
A Baltimore County Circuit judge declined yesterday to sentence Wesley Allen Rollins to death, saying that despite a jury's verdict to the contrary, he did not believe beyond a reasonable doubt that Rollins murdered 71-year-old Irene Ebberts. "If he could be charged and given the death penalty for being a horrible human being and a predator on society, I would do it in an instant," Judge John F. Fader II said as he imposed a sentence of life without parole. The judge then looked at members of Ebberts' family, who sat stony-faced along one courtroom bench.
TOPIC
By Richard J Goldstone and Richard J Goldstone,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2001
SINCE MILITARY tribunals were authorized by President Bush's executive order of Nov. 13, there has been a wide-ranging debate in the United States on their morality and legality. These tribunals have been supported principally on two grounds - first, that trials before ordinary courts would present serious security risks for all involved, especially judges and juries; and second, the necessity of protecting sensitive security information. Criticisms have been based on concerns for fairness and justice and the credibility of the proposed tribunals.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.