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By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
On Friday the 13th, the Grim Reaper loomed behind the smashed remains of a Toyota Corolla in front of Archbishop Spalding High School in hopes of dramatizing the dangers of drunken driving.In front of and beside him stood members of the school's Students Against Drunk Driving chapter and several county and police officials assembled to launch the sixth annual Operation S.A.V.E. (Selected Alcohol Violations Enforcement).Under the program, county police use a grant from the state Department of Transportation to put extra officers on the street during prom and graduation season to be on the lookout for youthful drunken drivers, said Officer Randy Bell, a police spokesman.
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By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Executives at multimillion-dollar companies don't typically spend their leisure time enduring mountain blizzards or desert heat. But Bryan Offutt and his team aren't typical executives. Under Armour's burly director of outdoor marketing spent weeks with the company's chief operating officer, Kip Fulks; Fulks' brother, Koby, a senior marketing manager at the company; and full-time hunter Jason Carter in pursuit of some of the largest animals on the continent on some of its most rugged terrain.
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NEWS
By William Hathaway and By William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | May 19, 2002
In the last century in the developed world, death's face has become wrinkled. In 1900, one of death's most common visages was that of a 5-year-old child struggling for breath, trying to clear his or her lungs of fluids caused by the sudden assault of pneumonia or perhaps influenza. Today, death's favorite weapon is a lethal blockage in one of the arteries of the heart, caused by plaques that form gradually during 70 years or more of life. So, what dramatic changes in the Grim Reaper's handiwork can we expect in the next 50 years?
NEWS
By Robert C. Koehler | June 17, 2012
The poison seeps slowly into the future. No one notices. "The Obama administration," the Wall Street Journal informs us, "plans to arm Italy's fleet of Reaper drone aircraft, a move that could open the door for sales of advanced hunter-killer drone technology to other allies... " I can't quite get beyond the name: Reaper drones? "The Predator's manufacturer, General Atomics, later developed the larger Reaper," John Sifton wrote last February in The Nation, "a moniker implying that the United States was fate itself, cutting down enemies who were destined to die. That the drones' payloads were called Hellfire missiles, invoking the punishment of the afterlife, added to a sense of righteousness.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 7, 1995
Chita Rivera is a dancer who gets a kick out of life -- even when life kicks back.A positive attitude is a handy thing to have when you're playing a character who represents death. That's been Rivera's lot for more than three years as the title character in the musical "Kiss of the Spider Woman," which opens tomorrow at the Mechanic Theatre.Rivera, who won her second Tony Award for "Spider Woman," admits that when she's perched high in the Spider Woman's giant web, she often feels the presence of the many friends she's lost over the years.
FEATURES
October 16, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Sam (Bret Harrison) wants a break, but his boss, Satan, has other plans in Reaper (9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54).
NEWS
December 19, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Westminster High's Students Against Driving Drunk chapter will sponsor a "Grim Reaper" project today to raise student awareness about drug abuse, drinking and driving.Announcements about drinking while intoxicated statistics will be made at 23-minute intervals to point out how frequently DWI-related deaths occur. An outdoor graveyard and indoor tombstones will be set up.Students will also view the film "The Toll, the Tears," produced by Kelly Burke as part of his community service for a DWI conviction.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 31, 1991
William Sadler has been around Hollywood for a good while, playing among other roles the terrorist in "Die Hard 2" and the murderous extortionist in "Hot Spot." He won some attention along the way, but he seemed doomed to play supporting heavies. Then ''Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey'' came along, and all of a sudden, Sadler is a comic find.In the film, Sadler plays The Grim Reaper, or Death, as Bill and Ted call him. The boys are bounding between heaven and hell when they meet Death at the gates of hell.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2003
BY THE time Dan Magness realized he liked to collect antique Porsche tractors, he and wife Pat and children Dan Jr., 20, Erin, 16, and Ben, 14, were in high gear working together at their farm in northwest Harford County. The Magness family loves its herd of 70 black-and-white dappled Holstein cows and 70 calves and heifers -- prize-winners at the Harford County Farm Fair and a source of income for the family. The grazing herd yields wholesome milk -- at 3 a.m., when Pat or Dan oversees a mechanical milking ritual.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 19, 1991
''Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey'' plods along for 45 minutes or so, then Death -- The Grim Reaper -- appears and the film comes to life.The new comedy, a sequel to the surprisingly successful ''Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure'' (1989), won't exactly knock you down, but it does have some laughs, not the least of which are the closing credits -- headlines from newspapers and magazines telling us about Death and his success as an eccentricity.''Bogus'' has its subtleties. When Bill and Ted meet Death, he is prepared to escort them to hell, but he offers the boys a way out. He will play games with them, and if they beat him, they beat going to hell.
FEATURES
October 16, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Sam (Bret Harrison) wants a break, but his boss, Satan, has other plans in Reaper (9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54).
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2003
BY THE time Dan Magness realized he liked to collect antique Porsche tractors, he and wife Pat and children Dan Jr., 20, Erin, 16, and Ben, 14, were in high gear working together at their farm in northwest Harford County. The Magness family loves its herd of 70 black-and-white dappled Holstein cows and 70 calves and heifers -- prize-winners at the Harford County Farm Fair and a source of income for the family. The grazing herd yields wholesome milk -- at 3 a.m., when Pat or Dan oversees a mechanical milking ritual.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Final Destination 2 is definitely nasty. Ostensibly a supernatural /horror thriller about how cheating death is not a life choice to be taken lightly, what it really is is a doctoral thesis on how many grisly, inventive ways people can die supposedly accidental deaths in a movie. The answer is plenty, the inventive factor considerable, the grisly quotient off the charts. It ain't art. But as a cinematic house of horrors, it more than fills the bill. In the original Final Destination, we met a bunch of high school students who were supposed to be on a plane to Europe, but were instead yanked off at the last minute thanks to a ruckus caused by one of them having premonitions of doom.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and By William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | May 19, 2002
In the last century in the developed world, death's face has become wrinkled. In 1900, one of death's most common visages was that of a 5-year-old child struggling for breath, trying to clear his or her lungs of fluids caused by the sudden assault of pneumonia or perhaps influenza. Today, death's favorite weapon is a lethal blockage in one of the arteries of the heart, caused by plaques that form gradually during 70 years or more of life. So, what dramatic changes in the Grim Reaper's handiwork can we expect in the next 50 years?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci, whose films have touched off both great controversy (1972's "Last Tango In Paris" raised all sorts of ruckus with its sexuality) and great acclaim (1987's "The Last Emperor" won both the Best Picture and Best Director Oscars), will be the subject of a career retrospective this month at Washington's National Gallery of Art.The film series opens at 4 p.m. Sunday with his most recent film, 1998's "Besieged," with Thandie Newton ("Beloved") as a young woman from a repressed African nation.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1998
VICKI SOWERS loves October. She loves the cool weather, the colors. Best of all, she loves Halloween.Since she was 15, Sowers has been involved with the Haunted Trail in Severn (also known as the Trails of Terror).A few years ago, she moved away from Maryland, but she's back and she's signed up for a new stint as a trail guide."I'm pumped," she said. "I'm ready. I'm ready to scare people."PTC Sowers' way of scaring people is great fun. As the Grim Reaper, she will lead people through the many scenes of the trails, helping them rediscover the fun of ghouls and ghostly things.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1998
VICKI SOWERS loves October. She loves the cool weather, the colors. Best of all, she loves Halloween.Since she was 15, Sowers has been involved with the Haunted Trail in Severn (also known as the Trails of Terror).A few years ago, she moved away from Maryland, but she's back and she's signed up for a new stint as a trail guide."I'm pumped," she said. "I'm ready. I'm ready to scare people."PTC Sowers' way of scaring people is great fun. As the Grim Reaper, she will lead people through the many scenes of the trails, helping them rediscover the fun of ghouls and ghostly things.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Final Destination 2 is definitely nasty. Ostensibly a supernatural /horror thriller about how cheating death is not a life choice to be taken lightly, what it really is is a doctoral thesis on how many grisly, inventive ways people can die supposedly accidental deaths in a movie. The answer is plenty, the inventive factor considerable, the grisly quotient off the charts. It ain't art. But as a cinematic house of horrors, it more than fills the bill. In the original Final Destination, we met a bunch of high school students who were supposed to be on a plane to Europe, but were instead yanked off at the last minute thanks to a ruckus caused by one of them having premonitions of doom.
FEATURES
By Sid Smith and Sid Smith,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 1997
The image is among the more indelible from film Wunderkind Quentin Tarantino: an imposing row of guys, bedecked in black suits and shades, methodically marching toward the camera -- a menacing gaggle of human crows.Later, we discover that the hoods in the 1992 movie "Reservoir Dogs" have been given anonymous names based on colors. Mr. Pink asks Joe, the man in charge, "Why can't we pick out our own color?"Joe replies: "I tried that once, it don't work. You get four guys fighting over who's gonna be Mr. Black."
NEWS
March 17, 1997
George Will sounds like a threatened manGeorge Will's supercilious column (Feb. 24) regarding the sculpture of suffragettes Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott in the Capitol Rotunda is so much patronizing pap.He mockingly refers to the "representation of X chromosomes in the Rotunda" and disdainfully dismisses the ''grievances of groups that feel neglected.'' Half the population of the U.S. constitutes a ''group''?The tone of the entire article is one of contemptuous derision.
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