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NEWS
By Linley Taber | July 12, 2009
In recent years, cities and regions all over the country have played host to reality television shows. While most of these are based in New York and Los Angeles, Baltimore's nearest neighbor is getting in on the act. Recently, camera crews descended on DuPont Circle to begin filming The Real World: Washington, D.C.; meanwhile, the Lifetime Channel is preparing for the fall debut of Blonde Charity Mafia, following three young Washingtonians as they navigate...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Morgan Eichensehr and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Reality TV makes strange bedfellows - especially on a tattoo competition show. Don Peddicord, 30, co-owner of Tattoo Dynasty in Joppa, met New York-based tattoo artist Erik Suida during a casting call for Season 2 of the Spike tat competition show, "Ink Master. " "We actually waited in line together for about six hours and he just kind of rubbed me the wrong way from the beginning," Peddicord said. "I just never really cared for his attitude about things. " But after several years of social media "bashing," Suida called on Peddicord to be his rival for the show's fifth season, "Ink Master Rivals," now airing at 10 p.m. Tuesdays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 5, 2003
Television this week begins its midseason cycle of replacement series, and if you can't handle reality programming, you might as well turn off the tube. Networks and cable channels will feature the debuts of some two dozen new reality series in the next four months -- five this week alone. Combined with series already on the air, like MTV's The Osbournes, and those returning for a second season, like NBC's Meet the Folks, it might seem like too much reality to bear. But in the mix this week with such debased notions of reality as WB's The Surreal Life -- which places faded celebrities in singer Glen Campbell's former mansion to see how strange things can get -- is a profound PBS documentary that offers desperately needed context to the whole cultural megillah that reality television has become.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
Move over, Omarosa. The D.C. Beltway has a couple of new villains in town inching their way towards most-hated status. Catherine "Cat" Ommanney, the British-born housewife given to making cringe-worthy racially charged comments, and Michaele Salahi, the infamous White House crasher who recently had a run-in with Whoopi Goldberg on "The View," have been scene-stealers for their bad behavior since "The Real Housewives of D.C. " premiered earlier this...
NEWS
October 19, 2012
Once again, I have to agree with Susan Reimer - presidential debates are truly painful to watch ("No debate," Oct. 18). I watched the first 15 minutes of the first debate, 3-4 minutes of the vice presidential debates but chose not to watch the most recent debate. So-called reality TV is pretty pathetic, and the debates certainly come pretty close to being simply another reality TV program. I would however, extend my criticism to the whole campaign process, which seems to be endless.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
I'm not going to lie. When my husband was deployed , certain rules and routines in our house kind of fell apart. The worst of these was probably TV. Between pregnancy, a hellacious cold that kept me up at night for literally weeks on end, sciatica that just wouldn't quit, work stresses, and, lest we forget, winter, we watched a lot of television, my 3-year-old and I. By the time his baby brother was born, Isaac could actually navigate streaming...
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Who says there are "no second acts in American lives"? Well OK, F. Scott Fitzgerald did. But he didn't know about so-called reality television shows. In recent months, we have seen has-been pop stars as diverse as Erik Estrada, Flava Flav, Tammy Faye Bakker Messner and Vanilla Ice re-emerge in the unblinking eye of roving mini-cams. Now watch for Martha Stewart, fresh from a prison release that received more coverage than any since South Africa's Nelson Mandela ended 27 years of political imprisonment in 1989.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - I ran smack into the zeitgeist on Page 60 of TV Guide. Turn there and you find yourself in the middle of a breathless "Where are they now?" on a bunch of reality show contestants. This includes Ryan Sutter and Trista Rehn, who became America's sweethearts after falling in "love" on an ABC reality show called The Bachelorette. The network threw them a lavish wedding in December and broadcast it to an audience of millions. So anyway, on Page 60, we find Mr. Sutter, a firefighter and paramedic, complaining about the cost of fame.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
I'm ashamed to admit it, but I have become hooked on the "Real Housewives" television series on Bravo. About a year ago, I caught a few minutes here and there of the "Real Housewives of Orange County. " But it wasn't until I started watching the New Jersey and later New York versions of the show that I became a regular viewer. I say ashamed because there are more productive things I could be doing with my time than watching a group of women socialize, argue and all too often preen for the camera crew that follows them through their daily lives and interactions with each other and their families.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A reality TV star and professional skateboarder with ties to Baltimore was arrested last week in Ocean City after police were called to disturbances at a restaurant and a hotel. Brandon Novak, known for his reality TV and movie appearances with MTV star Bam Margera , was at the Ocean View Grill & BBQ on 16th Street with a friend on July 30 when the duo became disorderly, according to police. The restaurant asked the two men, who reportedly appeared intoxicated and were disturbing other diners, to leave but they refused.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
You may have heard that Ocean City boardwalk landmark Ocean Gallery is packing up and moving to Hollywood, but don't book that flight to Los Angeles quite yet. Owner Joe KroArt explains that he's been in talks for nearly five years with various television producers in an effort to create a reality TV show centered on the gallery. After going back and forth with a number of pitches, one idea kind of floated to the top: a show that would follow his team as they relocated the beloved 50-year icon from Ocean City to Hollywood.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
When I read Susan Reimer 's column about Rachel Canning, the willful N.J. teen who's suing her parents for support and tuition, I'm delighted I never had children ( "Education is not optional," March 7). No doubt other childless adults feel the same. Whatever the finale to this ridiculous story may be, let me also point out the obvious: All those involved are very attractive, upper-middle class Americans, and also from New Jersey. Do you get my drift? I see is a TV reality show in the making.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Food for Thought stage at next weekend's Baltimore Book Festival will present a full slate of talks and demonstrations by Baltimore-based chefs and visiting cookbook authors. Among the locals are Johnny's barista Lindsay DiFabbio (1 p.m. Friday), caterer and former restaurateur Connie Crabtree-Burritt (noon Sept. 28) and Bradley Willits, executive chef at the B&O American Brasserie (noon Sept. 29 ). The most recognizable names among the visiting authors are not necessarily associated with the world of cooking.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 1, 2013
No doubt, a lot of open-wheel racing afficionados were shaking their heads after the Grand Prix of Baltimore turned into a demolition derby on Sunday, but the "chaos" that prevailed on the debris-strewn downtown course was just what the event needed to capture our admittedly primative imaginations. This is America. We don't like soccer. We don't like chess. We didn't even like real baseball until the steroid scandal shamed us back into it. Let's be honest, we claim we want to support public broadcasting, but we'd rather watch Shark Week.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
They're the kind of products that would never carry the words "As seen on TV. " A winged backpack that flies you to school on time. An exploding water bomb that thwarts school bullies. A clothes hanger-shaped boomerang for felling a Tyrannosaurus rex. Those who conjured up the products also created corresponding commercials, and you won't see those on television, either. They're courtesy of the imagination of students at the Columbia-based Drama Learning Center, who last week took part in a weeklong summer camp called TV Stars: Reality TV & Commercials.
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | August 2, 2005
`THE WORLD as we know it is over," claims the president of CBS television. While Leslie Moonves and other TV executives may mourn the decline of traditional dramas and situation comedies, teenagers have made reality shows a part of the new world culture. Many critics expected that reality TV was a craze that would fade like Nehru jackets and fondue pots. But the phenomenon, like mold, is persistently growing. The Reality Television Show Directory Web site lists 280 programs that transport viewers from cradle (Supernanny)
TRAVEL
By Hugo Martin and Hugo Martin,Tribune Newspapers | July 26, 2009
LOS ANGELES -- Move over, Grauman's Chinese Theatre. The hot new Southern California tourist attractions are the restaurants, boutiques and tattoo parlors where some of reality television's most popular shows are filmed. Tourists from as far away as Germany fly in to visit the West Hollywood tattoo shop featured in the Learning Channel's LA Ink. Fans of the E! hit Keeping Up With the Kardashians stream into the Calabasas clothing stores run by the show's stars. And sightseers and diners alike jam the pricey West Hollywood eatery frequented by personalities on MTV's The Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
“I'm 27. I'm retired. But I still want to compete.” That's Olympic champion Michael Phelps talking in “The Haney Project,” a Golf Channel series that stars Tiger Woods' one-time coach taking on a new celebrity student each season. Phelps' words pretty much summarize the premise of this year's edition, which starts Monday night. In the past, Hank Haney's celebrity pupils have included Ray Romano, Rush Limbaugh, Charles Barkley and Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine. This season, the student is the swimmer from Baltimore who won 18 gold medals in Olympic competition.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Michael Waddell didn't plan on being famous, at least among the hunters who now watch his weekly "Bone Collector" television show on the Outdoor Channel. He never thought about people buying his camouflage hats, T-shirts and other merchandise. He still can't believe that he has his own trademark muzzleloader with his now-recognizable logo engraved on it. "I never even really had a dream of being a television personality," Waddell said last week in Frederick, where he was one of the main attractions at the National Rifle Association's Great American Hunting and Outdoor Show.
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