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By DANIEL BERGER | October 9, 1993
"Anew moroseness of outlook in foreign affairs possessed many Americans. . . . Since the Old World was ridden by devils, they would have done with it.''This pessimistic belief in withdrawal was rooted partly in the despair of the economic depression, partly in pacifism, partly in the contrast between the bright aspirations . . . and the dark political realities . . . and partly in a guilt complex arising from the consciousness of duties unperformed.''It had three main effects. First it brought about a reinterpretation of history to justify American abstentions, 'proving' that other nations had always been bad beyond redemption.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 22, 2014
The two artists exhibiting at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House seemingly have two very different ways of seeing the world. Jenny Singleton has a mostly abstract approach, while Beatrice Hardy is a realist by comparison. Singleton's acrylic paintings occasionally have quasi-figurative elements, but they remain abstractions. There's no mistaking the brown trunk of an elephant in "After the Parade," but the depiction of its body is so schematic that in a philosophical sense it seems more like an elephant as idea rather than an elephant as image.
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NEWS
August 23, 1995
/TC Gov. Parris N. Glendening's warning about budget cutbacks to a convention full of county officials in Ocean City probably didn't stir fear in the hearts of many Marylanders. Just some "inside baseball" at the Maryland Association of Counties' summer meeting, right?Wrong. The rhetoric of August precedes the debates of February, which beget the cuts of March, which lead to the lost services of July. Like a pebble tossed in a pond, the governor's speech last weekend may eventually ripple out to be felt by state residents 12 or 15 months from now. The macro-economic debate of a summer MACO session can be the precursor to the micro-economic pain of local government budgets felt a summer later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
For Baltimore author Jen Michalski, 2013 is shaping up to be the Year of the Book Party. In a nine-month period, the 41-year-old freelance medical copywriter is having three works of fiction in different genres come out with three small, independent publishers. In March, Dzanc Books combined Michalski's two haunting novellas about fragile lives and released them under the title, "Could You Be With Her Now?" while a short story collection, "From Here," comes out in November under the auspices of Aqueous Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clare McHugh and Clare McHugh,Special to the Sun | December 19, 2004
A Time of Angels By Patricia Schonstein. William Morrow. 224 pages. $24.95. Magical realism, a technique used so evocatively by Latin American writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa, separates literary masters from the mere journeymen who attempt to employ it. While creating a world both fantastical and recognizable is a worthy enough goal, it requires a subtle gift to pull off successfully. Done right, magical realism adds dimension and meaning to a story, but used inexpertly, it allows an author to take shortcuts, cheating readers out of the true parsing of experience and emotion they expect from a novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Fillat | November 8, 1991
BENDANN ART GALLERIESTowson Town Center. Matt ZollGallery director Lance Bendann says a strong sense of realism is what comes across first when viewing these still lifes and portraits by this 23-year-old Maryland artist. Trained at the Schuler School of Fine Arts in the Maroger medium -- a composition of medium used by Renaissance masters -- Mr. Zoll has created "jewel-like paintings" that are neither coldly realistic nor photo-realistic, says Mr. Bendann, noting, "There is a mood and a quality to the paintings over and above their realism."
FEATURES
By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2002
In the sprawling parking lot of contemporary American culture, the one with the wadded-up Burger King bags skittering across it like urban tumbleweed, Kmart is a Winnebago straddling two spaces. It's way too big to ignore. From the perky preamble of its in-store public address system announcement - "Attention Kmart shoppers!" - to the moniker for Kmart's get-'em-while-they're-hot bargains - Blue Light specials - Kmart resonates. But the most significant cultural contribution of the company, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this week and faces an uncertain future, may be its status as the only business establishment in American history to have served as the label for a major literary genre.
TOPIC
By Peter Howard | December 31, 2000
CONDOLEEZZA Rice, who will be President-elect George W. Bush's national-security adviser, describes herself as a foreign-policy "Realist." The word has for her, a Stanford University political science professor, a specific academic meaning - one that potentially signals significant changes under a Bush administration foreign policy. Realism is a theory of international politics. It states that power is the ultimate arbiter among states in an anarchic world. Power is defined as a state's material capability to fight and win wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2004
When I was a kid, we drank Borden's brand milk that came in glass bottles with a picture of Elsie the Cow on the label. So you know how long ago that must have been. Ever since, though, I've had a soft spot for cows, and judging from the unapologetically realistic sculptures of Pennsylvania artist J. Clayton Bright, on view in Hagerstown at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts through Nov. 7, so does he. Bright's biography reads like that of an Old Fashioned Artist before the proliferation of Master of Fine Arts degrees succeeded in post-modernizing the outlook of anyone with a paint brush and a shred of talent.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 27, 2001
When photography was invented in 1839, some observers predicted that painters would soon be put out of business by the camera's incredible powers of imitation. That never happened, of course. While daguerreotypes did replace miniature painted portraits, the art of painting in general reacted by gradually moving away from literal representation, a process that eventually gave rise to the various abstract aesthetics of the modernist era. Still, what goes around comes around, and it was probably only a matter of time before painters decided to challenge the camera's mastery of illusion.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
Your editorial "After the downgrade" (Aug. 9) completely misses the real reason for the debt downgrade by Standard & Poor's. Rather than a "rejection of doctrinaire politics" as you describe it, the downgrade expressed a totally realistic concern about our inability to manage the massive debt which has ballooned under this administration. While those tea party members who opposed any increase in the debt ceiling may have been short-sighted, their concerns were well-founded and are shared by most Americans.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | March 6, 2009
Recession meets escapism equals huge box office" became the Hollywood equation of the season when box-office analyst Paul Dergarabedian coined it to account for "the biggest start to any box-office year I've ever seen."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2008
Screenwriter John Strysik could have written the script for Stuck on Post-Its. It slaps endless reminders of social significance over the fictionalized case of a female driver who hit a pedestrian and left him snagged and disabled in her windshield. In Stuck, the woman is Brandi (Mena Suvari), a nursing aide on the eve of a promotion at an assisted-living home. The man is Tom (Stephen Rea), a former member of the middle class who is struggling to keep his collar white though he's just been tossed from a fleabag hotel.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | April 4, 2008
The appreciative coverage of film director Jules Dassin, who died at age 96 on Monday, paid just tribute to a formidable yet underrated director. But it also testified to the impact of small distribution companies and the movie lovers who prize their wares. For without the efforts of Rialto Pictures, it's doubtful this director would be as widely and properly remembered as he has been this week. Eight years ago tomorrow, when researching an article on his groundbreaking jewel-heist film Rififi for The New York Times, I called him at his office in Greece.
NEWS
By Photos by Monica Lopossay and Photos by Monica Lopossay,Sun photographer | February 11, 2008
What started in 1957 as a mannequin-repair shop eventually grew into D'Agostino Studios, which for the past two decades has created lifelike sculptures, casts, molds and costumes for museums such as the Smithsonian and has worked on hundreds of mannequins of characters from the Star Wars saga for displays across the globe. Studio owner Lania D'Agostino began working for what was then called Mannequin Service Company in 1985. Today, she and her staff of artisans create, fashion and adorn an array of faces and postures, with an eye on realism.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 6, 2008
After seeing Violence and Tranquility, Tony Shore's unexpectedly dark vision of his hometown at C. Grimaldis Gallery, I couldn't help thinking the prize-winning Baltimore painter has been watching The Wire, HBO's award-winning dark drama about crime and corruption in Baltimore. The Wire is classic American film noir for the small screen. Shore's unsparing images of gang warfare and violent crime bring the same moral ambivalence, alienation and gratuitous cruelty to the gallery scene. There's something shocking about this subject matter, though perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that Shore has begun using such imagery recently.
FEATURES
May 23, 2007
Exhibit `Contemporary Realism' Go see the Invitational Contemporary Realism exhibit of landscape paintings and other interpretations at Bendann Art Gal leries, 830 Kenilworth Drive, Towson, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free. Call 410- 825-0585 or go to bendannart galleries.com.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Jack Clayton, 73, a movie director who began an era of social realism in British film with "Room at the Top" in 1958 and directed Robert Redford in "The Great Gatsby," died Saturday at a hospital in Slough, England, 15 miles west of London. His small but admired body of work included "The Innocents" (1961), a surreal retelling of Henry James's ghost story "The Turn of the Screw," starring Deborah Kerr; and "The Pumpkin Eater" (1964), about marriage, divorce and adultery, starring Anne Bancroft, Peter Finch and James Mason.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
Landscape and still life exhibit -- McBride Gallery will show the exhibit Realism: Landscape, Still Life and the Figure Sunday through June 24 at 215 Main St., Annapolis. It will feature the works of Robert J. Barber, Neilson Carlin, Michael Timothy Davis and R. Jean Vallieres. An opening reception will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Gallery hours are from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday and from 12 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday. 410-267-7077.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 27, 2007
About 20 years ago, students tudying to be paramedics at Anne Arundel Community College practiced in the back of an old ambulance at the nearest fire department. Instructors removed the rear doors so they could watch. As ambulances became more expensive, fire departments were less likely to take the vehicles off the street for such use. Until last fall, the Anne Arundel County Fire Department gave students a 20-minute presentation on an ambulance before returning it to duty. For many students that was their only exposure to an ambulance before they went out on emergency calls, said Michael O'Connell Jr., an adjunct faculty member and commander of the training division for the county fire department.
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