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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Michael James, William Thompson and Jacques Kelly contributed to this article | May 23, 1994
Caps and gowns were the dress, and character and the uncertain future were the themes as four Maryland colleges unleashed 3,500 graduates yesterday into the "real world of work."The future is likely to bring some frustrations, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson told 650 Morgan State University graduates, including 141 who received advanced HTC degrees.Mr. Wilson, who wrote "Fences," "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" and "The Piano Lesson," said the world is more fast-paced and competitive than when he graduated from college, and he urged students to persevere through the uncertain times they may face.
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FEATURES
By James Endrst and James Endrst,The Hartford Courant | June 12, 1992
Norman Korpi is back in the real world after spending three months in "The Real World" of MTV.A 25-year-old product designer living in New York's Brooklyn borough, Mr. Korpi was one of the seven young adults picked to star in "The Real World," a calculated mix of soap opera and rockumentary that in less than a month has become MTV's top-rated show. (The 13-episode program is broadcast Thursday nights.).Looking back, Mr. Korpi says, "It wasn't a real experience; it was a surreal experience.
FEATURES
By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,New York Times News Service | July 9, 1992
Billed as a reality-based soap opera, MTV's "The Real World" is real largely by accident, and its seven principal players are far too independent to be stuffed into a tidy little soap opera. Yet this force-fed documentary series, reaching the 9th of its 13 half-hour episodes on tonight at 10 p.m., has been steadily evolving into the year's most riveting television, a compelling portrait of twentysomethings grappling with the '90s.In the beginning, the executive producers Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray (she comes out of network daytime drama, he from news and documentary production)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 8, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* No, it is not your imagination if you seem to recognize Grant Show, one of the stars of the new Fox series "Melrose Place" premiering tonight (at 8:30, WBFF-Channel 45).His character, construction worker Jake, was introduced this spring on a two-part episode of "Beverly Hills, 90210."But does anybody else think the set-up for this show, aimed at young adults, seems oddly like the current MTV series "The Real World?"In that one (at 10 p.m. Thursdays on the cable service)
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 22, 1996
He was the lunch pail Hall of Famer last season, the old-fashioned shortstop who saved baseball from itself.Eight months later, with new bosses running the Orioles, Cal Ripken is watching the downward slope of his career slowly beginning to take shape.Welcome to the '90s, Cal.This is what happens to people. This is what happens in the real world.New bosses take over with new ideas about how the business should run, new opinions about the employees, new visions of the future.Is there a working stiff in this country who hasn't experienced that unsettling set of circumstances and wondered about his standing at work?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
Now, the first thing to know about "The Real World" is that it isn't the real world. Nowhere in the real world are seven young people set up in a nicely furnished SoHo loft apartment expressly for the purpose of being on television.But this is the MTV world. And the cable music network tonight tweaks another TV convention in undeniably fascinating style.Billed as a "young adult soap opera," the half-hour "The Real World" series debuts at 10 p.m. with two episodes.The twist of the show is that the seven people we see moving into the Manhattan apartment -- four guys and three women, aged 19 to 25 -- are not actors.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
Bringing to a close television's most unusual drama, Julie, Becky, Norman, Kevin, Heather, Eric and Andre make their swan song tomorrow on cable's MTV network -- and if you don't know who these young folks are, you're just not tuned into "The Real World."The seven people age 19 to 25 moved into a Manhattan loft apartment earlier this year to live an unscripted, "reality-based soap opera."Chosen by MTV from about 500 applicants, these non-performers agreed to live three months of their lives in front of camera crews.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | February 9, 1995
I have a special fondness for madmen in literature -- the gentle Don Quixote types who look around and decide that the so-called real world is not quite lovely enough for their tastes. And so, they wrap themselves in a cocoon of fantasy. And they live there and are content, happily ever after.I think it takes courage to go crazy like that -- because people laugh.J. Henry Waugh is the gentle lunatic of Robert Coover's 1968 novel, "The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop."
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | December 6, 1993
I had dinner with an old friend and talented consultant about a week after he started a new assignment. We ended up talking past one another.He'd spit out nonstop statistics, demonstrating how his client wasn't keeping up in this or that market segment, etc. Then I'd interrupt with something like, "But who's doing something interesting in the industry? . . . Didn't I read about a weird new product that . . .?"In short, he's a "quant jock," as we used to call the numbers fanatics at the consulting firm McKinsey & Co. I'm a "cases" kinda guy, who wants to know "who's doing something neat."
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 16, 2009
The call about Michael Phelps' car accident on Calvert Street crackled over the newsroom police radio as I was about to leave work Thursday night. My first thought was, when I get home, I'll have to go online and see what happened. But then, a moment of clarity, a sense of the absurdity: I was going to get on my computer to see what was happening on a street corner just several blocks from where I was standing? When did the real world become a place for people who can't handle the Internet?
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