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By Jordan Bartel, b | February 1, 2012
After his time spent as one of seven strangers on MTV's "The Real World: D.C.," we're assuming Baltimore native Ty Ruff, 23, was better equipped to handle drama. Then came this season of MTV's other addictive reality show "The Challenge" (10 p.m. Wednesdays). This year, the "Real World"/"Road Rules" vets still compete in random feats of athletic strength, but each cast member is paired on a team with an ex. In Ruff's case, that means working with former "D.C. " flame Emily Schromm. Ruff, who grew up in Park Heights and now lives in Los Angeles, said he had mixed feelings about the pairing.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
Maybe instead of moving all of the current illegals off into far off places we should build a tent city on the mall in Washington so our rulers can see what they have wrought ("America's refugee crisis," July 9). Oh, that's right, they go to and from their fiefdoms via underground or tinted window transport so they never have to see the real world. William M. Libercci Sr., Perry Hall - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | July 2, 2012
Even if they end up being a villain, we always have love for Baltimore folks on reality shows. So far on "The Real World: St. Thomas," Dundalk native Trey Weatherholtz, 23, is far from a villain. He reminds us of that popular guy in high school who also happened to be really nice to all the cliques. So we felt (slightly) bad for asking him these semi-inappropriate questions. You're from Dundalk. What's the grandest showcase of Dundalkian pride we should expect from you this season?
NEWS
May 24, 2014
I am currently a student at the Baltimore School for the Arts. I feel that the article "Who is responsible for Jabril?" (May 19) misrepresents BSA because it blames the institution for one person's decisions. The real art world is highly competitive, and BSA tells everyone at the beginning of their high school career the expectations they must meet to stay in. In this case, BSA did give the student multiple opportunities to stay, but he was the one who chose to leave. A good school should not be blamed for one student's failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Gross | December 27, 2009
When Ty Ruff, a 22-year-old Baltimorean, heard that he'd be a castmate in "The Real World: D.C.," he was disappointed. The previous season had been filmed in Cancun, Mexico, and the one before that took place in Brooklyn, N.Y. Once he settled in, though, being in Dupont Circle "was like ... the other side of the world." Ruff moved into the house at 2100 S St. on July 2 with seven strangers, but the castmates, some of whom were just 5 years old when the original "The Real World" was broadcast in 1992, can't say much about the 23rd season of the show, which is scheduled to premiere at 10 p.m. Dec. 30 on MTV. Their tight-lipped spiels sound rehearsed, as each castmate chants the "live hard, play hard" mantra they say defines D.C. culture.
NEWS
May 24, 2014
I am currently a student at the Baltimore School for the Arts. I feel that the article "Who is responsible for Jabril?" (May 19) misrepresents BSA because it blames the institution for one person's decisions. The real art world is highly competitive, and BSA tells everyone at the beginning of their high school career the expectations they must meet to stay in. In this case, BSA did give the student multiple opportunities to stay, but he was the one who chose to leave. A good school should not be blamed for one student's failure.
NEWS
By WILLIAM G. DURDEN | December 3, 1993
It's the biggest game of ''Let's Pretend'' around. It seems that average to below-average students are disappearing rapidly from pre-collegiate and college campuses throughout the United States. Where did they all go so quickly? Is our educational system really so outstanding despite the daily news to the contrary?The College Board reports that since 1972 the percentage of ZTC college-bound seniors reporting high marks in school has almost trebled. In 1972, 28.4 percent of those taking the test said they had A or B averages.
NEWS
By WALTER T. ANDERSON | April 26, 1995
Disasters, tragedies and other front-page dramas come and go, but the Oklahoma City bombing has the feel of an event from which there is no turning back. America will never be the same. The country has become a part of the real world -- a little less special, and a little less safe. It may also become a lot less pleasant.Isolationism is our oldest, most fundamental tradition, and it dies hard because it is fundamentally psychological rather than political. It has to do with a deep yearning to be somehow apart from the disorder, corruption and danger of the world outside, to be safe within our superior institutions and our spacious continent.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Paul Foster gives new meaning to the term multi-tasking. He offers a quick handshake as he troubleshoots a problem with students printing a school newsletter. He helps another student with a computer graphics question, while checking the progress of yet another of his charges. He never breaks stride as he goes from one to the next in his graphics and printing communications class. When Foster accepted his teaching position at Sollers Point Technical High School, his main goal was to show his students what to expect in the real world of printing.
FEATURES
By James Endrst and James Endrst,The Hartford Courant | June 12, 1992
Norman Korpi is back in the real world after spending three months in "The Real World" of MTV.A 25-year-old product designer living in New York's Brooklyn borough, Mr. Korpi was one of the seven young adults picked to star in "The Real World," a calculated mix of soap opera and rockumentary that in less than a month has become MTV's top-rated show. (The 13-episode program is broadcast Thursday nights.).Looking back, Mr. Korpi says, "It wasn't a real experience; it was a surreal experience.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
This spring, roughly 1.6 million newly minted U.S. college graduates are exiting the campus cocoon and entering a world that is by turns encouraging, indifferent and often unsettling in the fullness of its ambiguity. The college GPS is now switched off, and most graduates have yet to settle on a new model. It's tough out here in the real world, so let's not sugar-coat it. And let's try, for once, to resist the urge to overwhelm these fledgling adults with truckloads of unhelpful - and unasked-for - advice.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 4, 2014
They toured the site - 27 aces of prime waterfront property wedged between ritzy Harbor East and trendy Fell's Point in Baltimore City. They met with the developer, who reviewed his $1 billion project of offices, retail, residential and hotel. Now, Loyola Blakefield students are taking a crack at coming up with their own plan for the site on which Harbor Point is being built. Loyola Blakefield is one of 10 teams this year, in Team Project, an annual event of ACE (Architecture, Construction and Engineering)
NEWS
By Claudia Diamond | November 7, 2013
Last week, more than 1,500 people - most of them recent law school graduates - found out whether they passed the Maryland Bar Examination, a grueling, two-day test designed to assess the taker's readiness to enter the marketplace and become your lawyer. Despite a decrease in law school applications nationwide and increasing concerns that the United States has too many lawyers, most test takers - about 80 percent - passed the Maryland bar exam given in July. Barring any issues that cast doubt on their "character and fitness" to be a lawyer, these successful test takers will be sworn in before the Court of Appeals of Maryland in January.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 17, 2013
"Why are there no libertarian countries?" In a much-discussed essay for Salon magazine, Michael Lind asks: "If libertarians are correct in claiming that they understand how best to organize a modern society, how is it that not a single country in the world in the early twenty-first century is organized along libertarian lines?" Such is the philosophical poverty of liberalism today that this stands as a profound question. Definitions vary, but broadly speaking, libertarianism is the idea that people should be as free as possible from state coercion so long as they don't harm anyone.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Republicans and Democrats appear to agree on at least one thing: that the United States is facing a STEM (science, technology engineering and math) crisis. In his most recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that he wants to "reward schools" that focus on STEM classes, for they are "the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. " And as far to the other end of the political spectrum as you can get, Gov. Rick Perry of Texas deemed May 6-12 to be the first ever "Celebration of STEM Education Week in Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
"Is there any way out other than the main stairs?" I asked. My husband, our real-estate agent, the seller's agent and I were standing in the finished basement of a home in Owings Mills. It was a vast space: a nice bathroom, a media room, a room big enough to waltz in and another room with hidden panels in the walls for stashing who knows what. There was even a fireplace at the bottom of the stairs, creating a spa-like atmosphere. But no, the selling agent said that there was just the one staircase, noting that some people like having only one way into the basement because exterior doors attract thieves.
FEATURES
By Susan Freudenheim and Susan Freudenheim,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2002
LAS VEGAS -- "My house in Cutoff is, like, a country house," says the all-smiles Trichelle, a 22-year-old from an aptly named rural Louisiana town, soon after the opening credits of the season premiere episode of MTV's The Real World. The cameras-in-the-house show that helped unleash a flood of so-called reality programming begins its 12th season on Sept. 17, set this time in the new youth-oriented Palms Casino Resort just off the Las Vegas strip. "This," drawls Trichelle, who -- like all cast members -- uses only her first name, "is a city house."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Inside a classroom at Howard Community College's new health sciences building are computerized mannequin patients, a replica ambulance and other devices that place students in simulated life-and-death situations. The facilities are part of the school's emergency medical service/paramedic program, which trains students to respond to the situations they'll face on emergency calls. But for Cory Boone and Nick Frazier, there's nothing like the real thing. They would know. Early this year, the Ellicott City residents, both students in the program, applied the skills they learned in class and while volunteering with the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue to assist victims of cardiac arrest.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Carl H. Russell cites the recent murder of a woman by her ex-boyfriend as evidence that firearms are necessary for protection ("Murder makes the case for firearms in the home," Feb. 14). One could say the same of any murder where the victim did not have a firearm. Yet it is a false argument because it ignores all the homicides that take place not because people don't have guns but because they do. In an ideal world we would confine the possession of firearms solely to potential victims, while withholding them from potential killers.
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