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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - When U.S. soldiers shot and killed Iraqi citizens at a checkpoint outside Karbala this week, Pentagon officials said the approaching vehicle failed to stop after warning shots were fired. They said seven of the 13 passengers had been killed. But a journalist on the scene with the Army unit described the captain excoriating his platoon for failing to fire warning shots in time and said that 10 out of 15 civilians in the car, including five young children, had been killed. Such firsthand accounts from hundreds of print and broadcast journalists who have been deployed, or "embedded," with U.S. troops - traveling, eating, sleeping with them - have provided some of the grittiest, most vivid and dramatic images of the war in Iraq, often live as events are unfolding.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,[Sun Reporter] | October 21, 2007
The War I Always Wanted By Brandon Friedman Zenith Press / 255 pages / $24.95 They have stories to tell, those dusty soldiers who trek through the airport in their desert uniforms and worn boots and thousand-yard stares, on their way home from Iraq or on their way back. Most will never tell their stories: They're too painful and the humor too black, altogether too complicated for someone who wasn't there. An exception is this infantry lieutenant whose memoir of Afghanistan and Iraq is a book you'll want to read parts of aloud to somebody.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 3, 1994
The KGB promised Ames a dacha in Russia. That's where he should be locked up.Bosnian Croats and Bosnian Bosnians made peace because the Croats are getting ready for their real war, against the Serbs again.Soft-hearted BG&E won't shut off your power until April. They think this winter will be over by April?Bring on them Calgary Stampeders!
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 16, 2007
CHICAGO -- For anyone who has grown complacent about the danger of terrorism, the incidents in London and Glasgow, Scotland, were supposed to provide a jolt of reality. As former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy put it, "these foiled attacks are best understood as new rounds in a long, global war, provoked by the challenge of radical Islam." Here was proof that the jihadists are still out there, ready to strike at the moment of their choosing. Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff clearly agrees.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 11, 2000
If only Gore and Bush were running for vice president. Kostunica is the man. But you wouldn't want to sell him life insurance. Israel and the Arab neighbors have not had a real war in 27 years and too many people on both sides feel cheated. Route 404 could hold the record for longest bottleneck. Cheer up. Andre Braugher is back battling God and death.
NEWS
By Erik Floden | September 17, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH has asked Congress for $87 billion to pay for military operations and reconstruction in Iraq and Afghanistan. Instead of arguing, as he did before the war, that invading Iraq was necessary to counter an imminent threat from Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, Mr. Bush has depicted Iraq as the "central front" in the war against terrorism. It's not. The president's evolving Iraq narrative is a convenient justification for a failed policy that is almost wholly disconnected from the pursuit of those responsible for the 9/11 attacks.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - God bless the Democratic Party's primary voters in Iowa. They may have rescued our chances of succeeding in Iraq and even winning the war of ideas within the Arab-Muslim world. Go Hawkeyes! How so? Well, it seems to me that Iowa Democrats, in opting for Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards over former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, signaled (among other things) that they want a presidential candidate who is serious about fighting the war against the Islamist totalitarianism threatening open societies.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 16, 2007
CHICAGO -- For anyone who has grown complacent about the danger of terrorism, the incidents in London and Glasgow, Scotland, were supposed to provide a jolt of reality. As former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy put it, "these foiled attacks are best understood as new rounds in a long, global war, provoked by the challenge of radical Islam." Here was proof that the jihadists are still out there, ready to strike at the moment of their choosing. Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff clearly agrees.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
LEAVE IT to Bill Moyers to be the party-pooper. Here we are, knee-deep in ticker tape, bedecked in yellow ribbons, bursting our buttons with pride in good ol' American know-how that showed that Saddam a thing or two, and Moyers comes along to point out that only 7 percent of our bombs actually hit their targets.Seven percent! What, is he crazy? Didn't he watch TV? Didn't he see all those smart bombs hitting buildings and bridges like Johnny Unitas used to hit Raymond Berry? Shut up, kid, and watch the parade!
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 24, 1991
Jeremy Sibold, 16 years old and a Baltimore Polytechnic Institute student, is talking about the war. And, unconsciously, his hands start working an imaginary joystick.Perhaps his flight of fancy has placed him in an F-15 sortie over Baghdad or an A-10 rescue mission over endless desert. Or perhaps he is just in his Roland Park home, playing an advanced flight trainer computer game.For the technologically attuned like Jeremy -- the technoscenti, you might call them -- the war in the Persian Gulf so far has been their kind of war. The sleek fighter planes, the pinpoint-accurate bombs, the laser-guided missiles -- this is a war that seems to have leapt from their drafting tables, computer screens and imaginations.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 5, 2006
Republicans had a good time with John Kerry's botched joke on military service and the Iraq war, and they'll try to keep this blip of a story alive through Tuesday's election, even though the stack of Iraq stories before and after Kerry's gaffe should be of far greater concern to those of us who still think -- and those of us who still believe our votes make a difference. Kerry, a decorated Vietnam veteran, blew a zinger aimed at President Bush, and his "joke" ended up sounding like a sneer at the men and women in our all-volunteer military.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - God bless the Democratic Party's primary voters in Iowa. They may have rescued our chances of succeeding in Iraq and even winning the war of ideas within the Arab-Muslim world. Go Hawkeyes! How so? Well, it seems to me that Iowa Democrats, in opting for Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards over former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, signaled (among other things) that they want a presidential candidate who is serious about fighting the war against the Islamist totalitarianism threatening open societies.
NEWS
By Erik Floden | September 17, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH has asked Congress for $87 billion to pay for military operations and reconstruction in Iraq and Afghanistan. Instead of arguing, as he did before the war, that invading Iraq was necessary to counter an imminent threat from Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, Mr. Bush has depicted Iraq as the "central front" in the war against terrorism. It's not. The president's evolving Iraq narrative is a convenient justification for a failed policy that is almost wholly disconnected from the pursuit of those responsible for the 9/11 attacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Saddam Hussein's rule collapsed in a matter of hours yesterday across much of this capital city as ordinary Iraqis took to the streets in the thousands to topple Hussein's statues, loot government ministries, interrogation centers and to give a cheering welcome to advancing U.S. troops. Much of Baghdad became, in a moment, a showcase of unbridled enthusiasm for the United States as much as it metamorphosed into a crucible of unbridled hatred for Hussein and his 24-year rule.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - When U.S. soldiers shot and killed Iraqi citizens at a checkpoint outside Karbala this week, Pentagon officials said the approaching vehicle failed to stop after warning shots were fired. They said seven of the 13 passengers had been killed. But a journalist on the scene with the Army unit described the captain excoriating his platoon for failing to fire warning shots in time and said that 10 out of 15 civilians in the car, including five young children, had been killed. Such firsthand accounts from hundreds of print and broadcast journalists who have been deployed, or "embedded," with U.S. troops - traveling, eating, sleeping with them - have provided some of the grittiest, most vivid and dramatic images of the war in Iraq, often live as events are unfolding.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 21, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - The threat of war, war as a debate topic at the United Nations, war as seen on television and heard on radio and read in the newspapers, is relatively benign, an abstraction, compared to even a glimpse of what real war can mean to real people in real places. Kuwait, torn to pieces 12 years ago by the Iraqi military, was reminded of that yesterday when the rhythm of its day, usually set to the periodic calls to prayer, was instead dictated by shrieking air-raid sirens warning that missiles from Iraq had been launched this way. War did not mean death in Kuwait yesterday.
NEWS
September 23, 2001
THE LAST TIME the United States fought a war for the hearts and minds of a distant people, the United States lost Vietnam. The war that President Bush eloquently warned the American people Thursday night to anticipate is not that one. But it will not be quick or easy. The greatest advice is coming from allied countries that have endured long struggles with terrorism. No one key turns terrorism off. No single arrest or death ends it. But if this war is not attractive, neither is it avoidable.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | April 2, 1991
HE TOLD ME he didn't miss watching any of the Persian Gulf war. He's 8 years old and he was home with the flu during part of the war, so he got to watch a lot of CNN.He is also a latchkey kid since both his parents work, so he tells me: ''I'd come home from school in time for the briefings. My favorite part was the performance of the tanks, they did much better than expected.''Of course, I worried about those night-vision goggles that kept falling off the helmets of the guys, but in general we were super.
NEWS
By George J. Bryjak | January 21, 2003
SAN DIEGO - William Tecumseh Sherman is credited with uttering the now-famous phrase "War is hell." Like so many millions of men, women and children who experienced or witnessed warfare, the Union general had firsthand knowledge of the unspeakable evil of armed conflict. Unfortunately, Sherman's apt observation no longer conveys the emotional impact of the horror and madness of war - if, in fact, it ever did. Because of the way wars have been historically packaged and delivered to the American public - sanitized, embellished with romantic stories and neatly wrapped in a veneer of glory and patriotism - this is hardly surprising.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Kent Baker and Tom Keyser and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2002
Kentucky Derby winner War Emblem led a procession yesterday of six horses from Kentucky who arrived at Pimlico for the 127th Preakness Stakes. His trainer, Bob Baffert, said the colt seemed unaffected by his first airplane ride. Baffert and his assistant, Jim Barnes, walked him under the shedrow at the stakes barn before leading him into his stall. "I feel really good about this horse," Baffert said. "He's the real deal. He's like a stealth bomber - black, fast and dangerous." War Emblem will not reside in the stall traditionally reserved for the Derby winner.
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