Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReal Quiet
IN THE NEWS

Real Quiet

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Real Quiet, who shocked many horsemen during his life as he moved his skinny, imperfect body from the starting gate into the winner's circle in five Grade I races, including the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness, shocked the horse world again Monday when he died after a fall. Real Quiet, 15, was in his paddock at Penn Ridge Farms near Harrisburg, Pa., when he somehow fell on his left shoulder. A necropsy at New Bolton showed he fell so hard that he drove his shoulder into his neck, fracturing five cervical vertebrae, according to Mike Jester, owner of Penn Ridge Farm and majority shareholder and manager of the syndicate that owned the stallion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Allan Vought and Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 15, 2013
Pimlico Race Course officials confirmed Wednesday there will be nine probable starters for Saturday's 138th running of the Preakness with the addition of Govenor Charlie, trained by Bob Baffert, a five-time winner of the race. Baffert had been leaning toward entering the lightly raced colt and gave the final word he would be coming Wednesday. Govenor Charlie is expected to arrive from Churchill Downs in Kentucky sometime on Thursday, according to Mike Gathagan, Pimlico's vice president for communications.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
Real Quiet, the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, was sidelined in California yesterday for at least the remainder of the year with a cracked splint bone in his right front leg.Real Quiet's injury was announced just five days after Victory Gallop -- the horse that denied him the 1998 Triple Crown with victory by a nose in the Belmont Stakes -- was retired because of a torn suspensory ligament, a serious lower-leg injury.Mike Pegram, Real Quiet's owner, and Bob Baffert, his trainer, said the 4-year-old colt will be given 90 days to heal on his own.After that, they said, they will decide whether he can return to racing or will be retired.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Harry Nye , who co-owns Norman Asbjornson, the Preakness contender trained by Chris Grove , is blunt when asked about his horse's chances in Saturday's race. "We're going to win," he said. "The horse is peaking at the right time and we're going to surprise the hell out of everybody. We're going to kick everybody's butt. " Hello, Mr. Subtle. Nye, 65, lives in Harrisburg, Pa. He and his partner, Thomas McClay , own about 22 horses; this is their first trip to the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 1998
Real Quiet is a good horse, perhaps a very good one. And should he repeat his wide-running, authoritative Preakness victory, he will earn every penny of the $5 million Triple Crown bonus. So will his trainer, Bob Baffert.Indeed, Baffert's Triple Crown work in the past three seasons has been of Hall of Fame caliber. In 1996, he barely missed winning the Kentucky Derby by a desperate nose with Cavonnier, a marginal Grade I performer. Last year, he got two wins and a close second with Silver Charm against strong rivals.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
One was a Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, the other a gritty survivor of the Triple Crown wars. And when they squared off yesterday at the head of Pimlico's stretch, it was magic.Real Quiet and Free House. Free House and Real Quiet. They battled side-by-side from the final turn to the wire in the prestigious Pimlico Special until, finally, in the last strides, Real Quiet pulled ahead for a game and thrilling victory by a neck.But the fight, demanding to the end, claimed a victim. After producing a urine specimen for routine drug testing, Free House couldn't walk back to his barn.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER and TOM KEYSER,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Into the two-way radio Bob Baffert said urgently, "Easy, girl, easy."He was speaking to his radio-equipped exercise rider, Dana Barnes, aboard Real Quiet on the Churchill Downs' backstretch. Yesterday, on the verge of Triple Crown history, Real Quiet had just begun his final workout -- a five-eighths-mile breeze -- for the $1 million Belmont Stakes on Saturday at Belmont Park.But he was beginning too quickly. Baffert's stopwatch recorded the first eighth-mile in 11 4/5 seconds.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
ELMONT, N.Y. -- On the same storied racetrack at the same pivotal point in his career as Citation, Secretariat and Affirmed, a crooked, bargain-basement colt today will attempt to join racing's immortals.Possessing the tamest name of any horse perched at the Triple Crown's doorstep, Real Quiet will seek to accomplish what his stablemate, the charismatic Silver Charm, could not last year: win the Belmont Stakes after conquering the Kentucky Derby and Preakness."We won't disappoint the fans this time," said trainer Bob Baffert, who seems to believe that last year's loss by Silver Charm in the final strides was somehow his fault.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
Its past has been dotted with walkovers by Whirlaway and Citation, a historic match race between Seabiscuit and War Admiral, a 30-year hiatus between races, a revival 11 years ago, a track record by Farma Way in 1991 and purses ranging all the way up to $1 million.The likes of Cigar and Skip Away have prevailed this decade in the Pimlico Special, a Grade I event for older horses at the classic Preakness distance of 1 3/16 miles.Today's 34th renewal brings together for the first time the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, Real Quiet, and the hard-luck horse of the 1997 Triple Crown series, Free House, who was third in the Derby, second in the Preakness and third in the Belmont.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 1998
The pace should be fast, the track conditions uncertain and this is what else I think I know about the 124th running of the world's most intriguing race.Favorite Trick, last year's Horse of the Year, seems a risky proposition at the Derby distance. His best asset however, is trainer Billy Mott, a distance specialist.Still, Favorite Trick probably will need a major rainstorm to stay in the race. In 1997, his most impressive performance was a smashing, 3 1/2 -length win in the rain-soaked Saratoga Special.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 28, 2010
Real Quiet, who shocked many horsemen during his life as he moved his skinny, imperfect body from the starting gate into the winner's circle in five Grade I races, including the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness, shocked the horse world again Monday when he died after a fall. Real Quiet, 15, was in his paddock at Penn Ridge Farms near Harrisburg, Pa., when he somehow fell on his left shoulder. A necropsy at New Bolton showed he fell so hard that he drove his shoulder into his neck, fracturing five cervical vertebrae, according to Mike Jester, owner of Penn Ridge Farm and majority shareholder and manager of the syndicate that owned the stallion.
SPORTS
March 13, 2007
Horse racing Real Quiet remains at New Bolton Real Quiet, the 1998 Kentucky Derby winner whom syndicate manager Mike Jester expected to be released from the New Bolton Center perhaps as early as last week, remains under care at the facility in Kennett Square, Pa. "Real Quiet was admitted because he was sore in his hind end," Dr. Dean Richardardson said last night. " ... We discovered that he had relatively difficult to diagnose infections in both hind feet. They are responding well to treatment."
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | March 8, 2007
Real Quiet, the 1998 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner who has been recovering from lameness at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., might be released from the hospital as early as tomorrow. "I went to New Bolton, spoke to Dean [Dr. Dean Richardson] and saw Real Quiet," said Mike Jester, syndicate manager for the horse. "He's doing great. He's really back to his old self right now." Jester said a bone scan on Real Quiet's back legs Monday turned out negative. "Dean wants to give him a little more treatment on the right hind [foot]
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2004
Everything is magnified when a Triple Crown is on the line, even the losses. Seventeen horses have won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness and then faltered in the Belmont. That includes five starting in 1997. They failed trying to join the immortal 11 who have swept the series known as the Triple Crown. On Saturday, Smarty Jones will try to become the 12th when he competes in the 136th Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y. Smarty Jones has never lost in his eight races. But good, even great, horses have won the Derby and Preakness, but lost the Belmont.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2003
Eight other horses have been where Funny Cide stands now, heading into the Belmont Stakes with a chance to become racing's first Triple Crown winner since Affirmed in 1978. All eight found a way to lose the Belmont. Spectacular Bid stepped on a safety pin in his stall some 14 hours before the race in 1979. War Emblem stumbled leaving the starting gate last June. Alysheba, Sunday Silence and Pleasant Colony were soundly beaten. "You have to have, first of all, a horse that's good enough to win a third tough race in five weeks," said Grover "Bud" Delp, the longtime Maryland trainer who conditioned Spectacular Bid, "and then you have to get lucky and have everything go perfectly."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
After shining upon an array of racetracks around the country, the spotlight now focuses upon Churchill Downs. There, under the twin spires, the chosen few have come. The high-strung, muscular, powerful and beautiful thoroughbreds who have qualified (at least in their owners' minds) for the Kentucky Derby have descended upon the historic track in Louisville, Ky. They've begun working out in the dim morning light in final preparation for what has been called the most exciting two minutes in sports.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
For the second year in a row, Pimlico did its part. It provided the sporting world a horse with a chance to win the Triple Crown.Now it's up to Real Quiet.After winning the Preakness on Saturday with a powerful surge around the far turn -- two weeks after winning the Kentucky Derby -- Real Quiet leaves Pimlico today on course to become the 12th Triple Crown winner in history. Last year, Silver Charm followed the same route. But in the Belmont, he lost by less than a length.Silver Charm and Real Quiet are trained by Bob Baffert, the first trainer to win the Kentucky Derby and Preakness in consecutive years.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
It was beginning to look like Pimlico's darkest day.The 123rd running of the Preakness Stakes yesterday was marred by a power outage at the racetrack, and if not for an exciting victory by Kentucky Derby winner Real Quiet and the possibility of horse racing's first Triple Crown since Affirmed in 1978, the day might have been a total disaster.Maryland-trained jockey Kent Desormeaux guided Real Quiet to the outside entering the final turn and then breezed by favored Victory Gallop to win the second jewel in the Triple Crown.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.