Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReal News
IN THE NEWS

Real News

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
Here's hoping that news of guilty verdicts in the Jerry Sandusky case took a huge bite out of the audience ABC's  "20/20"  expected for its hour-too-long interview with Rielle Hunter Friday night. I say that because then ABC News will have gained nothing for debasing itself by giving an hour of prime time to this wretched woman so that she could sell more copies of her new book. In fact, I am really hoping ABC News lost some credibility with viewers for sticking with this tabloid con job instead of breaking away at some point to cover the real news that the former Penn State coach was found guilty on 45 of 48 counts in connection with the sexual molestation of minors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2014
In your report on Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's hosting campaign contributors in the state's skybox at the Washington Redskins' stadium, I got the impression that this was real news when in fact it's not. In the past The Sun has reported that former Mayor Sheila ("I'll take my pension and run") Dixon, current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley also have used state skyboxes to grease the palms of their political supporters ("Brown's skybox guests and their affiliates donated $20K to campaign," Feb. 1)
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
I have always respected David Zurawik's opinions regarding TV programs, but Sunday's article about Jon Stewart's and Stephen Colbert's shows he has absolutely no clue about what those "comics" do ("Laughing all the way to the voting booth," Oct. 24). There is a reason why (for better or for worse) Mr. Stewart is the "most trusted person in the news," according to a recent poll, a position he is actually uncomfortable with. If you ever paid real attention you'd see that Mr. Stewart very much cares about what's going on in politics these days, and what you call cynicism is satire at its finest (and no other person on TV has really mastered that)
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I've had enough of the Ray Lewis drivel in your newspaper ("Lewis' stronger denial should help," Jan. 31). It's bad enough to take up so much space in the Sports section but when his big mug is plastered on the front page, well that's quite overdoing it for me. The front page should be for more important news of the world instead of another overpaid athlete. Everyone is putting him on a pedestal like he's a god of some sort. Apparently, they have forgotten his involvement in the stabbing deaths of two innocent victims a while back.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I've had enough of the Ray Lewis drivel in your newspaper ("Lewis' stronger denial should help," Jan. 31). It's bad enough to take up so much space in the Sports section but when his big mug is plastered on the front page, well that's quite overdoing it for me. The front page should be for more important news of the world instead of another overpaid athlete. Everyone is putting him on a pedestal like he's a god of some sort. Apparently, they have forgotten his involvement in the stabbing deaths of two innocent victims a while back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Al Jazeera English will premiere a thought-provoking and hard-hitting documentary about Baltimore tonight, but viewers here won't be able to see it on cable TV. That's outrageous, ignorant and maddening. That's the conclusion I came to last week while reporting a Sunday story on the documentary and the bleak picture of Baltimore it would be presenting to a potential audience of 260 million homes elsewhere in the world. Read that story here . But that lack of access to Al Jazeera English on cable TV also makes me wonder what kind of sheep we are as media consumers -- and what kind of mice we have as media critics that cable companies can get away with not offering this option even as they they offer a sea of channels devoted to shopping and reruns of lame network shows from previous decades.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
In your report on Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's hosting campaign contributors in the state's skybox at the Washington Redskins' stadium, I got the impression that this was real news when in fact it's not. In the past The Sun has reported that former Mayor Sheila ("I'll take my pension and run") Dixon, current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley also have used state skyboxes to grease the palms of their political supporters ("Brown's skybox guests and their affiliates donated $20K to campaign," Feb. 1)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The Depression had Shirley Temple. This recession has … Kim Kardashian? Maybe every downturn gets the distraction it deserves. This has to be filed under the good news/bad news category: New figures are out showing that advertising has picked up at many magazines, among the industries hit hard by the recession, after steep declines in the past couple of years. But it's not all magazines. While newsstand mainstays like Newsweek and Forbes continued to struggle, particularly big jumps in ad pages came in the category of celebrity mags, those breathless trackers of the stars in all their dating, divorcing, drunken-driving glory.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 13, 1992
When the news becomes too grim and depressing, as it is now, and public voices are quivering with gloom and doom, I look for a haven of harmless nuttiness.I do this by asking someone who isn't easily embarrassed to go to a supermarket and get me the latest copy of the tabloid Weekly World News, one of my favorite newspapers.You won't find anything in it about riots, poverty, famine, disease, civil war, or politicians waggling fingers at each other and saying: "Nyah, nyah, your party did it, your party did it."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 28, 2003
BEIJING - Just before Hu Shuli finished a journalism fellowship at Stanford University eight years ago and returned to China, a retired journalism professor kindly advised her that she should consider staying in America, where the rules of the system actually allow reporters to do their jobs. "He said that in China, being a journalist, maybe you can never reach the international [standard]," says Hu, 50. She decided to see whether she could do just that, setting a goal that seemed nearly unattainable in China: "You should write some news that you really consider is news."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Al Jazeera English will premiere a thought-provoking and hard-hitting documentary about Baltimore tonight, but viewers here won't be able to see it on cable TV. That's outrageous, ignorant and maddening. That's the conclusion I came to last week while reporting a Sunday story on the documentary and the bleak picture of Baltimore it would be presenting to a potential audience of 260 million homes elsewhere in the world. Read that story here . But that lack of access to Al Jazeera English on cable TV also makes me wonder what kind of sheep we are as media consumers -- and what kind of mice we have as media critics that cable companies can get away with not offering this option even as they they offer a sea of channels devoted to shopping and reruns of lame network shows from previous decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
Here's hoping that news of guilty verdicts in the Jerry Sandusky case took a huge bite out of the audience ABC's  "20/20"  expected for its hour-too-long interview with Rielle Hunter Friday night. I say that because then ABC News will have gained nothing for debasing itself by giving an hour of prime time to this wretched woman so that she could sell more copies of her new book. In fact, I am really hoping ABC News lost some credibility with viewers for sticking with this tabloid con job instead of breaking away at some point to cover the real news that the former Penn State coach was found guilty on 45 of 48 counts in connection with the sexual molestation of minors.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
I have always respected David Zurawik's opinions regarding TV programs, but Sunday's article about Jon Stewart's and Stephen Colbert's shows he has absolutely no clue about what those "comics" do ("Laughing all the way to the voting booth," Oct. 24). There is a reason why (for better or for worse) Mr. Stewart is the "most trusted person in the news," according to a recent poll, a position he is actually uncomfortable with. If you ever paid real attention you'd see that Mr. Stewart very much cares about what's going on in politics these days, and what you call cynicism is satire at its finest (and no other person on TV has really mastered that)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The Depression had Shirley Temple. This recession has … Kim Kardashian? Maybe every downturn gets the distraction it deserves. This has to be filed under the good news/bad news category: New figures are out showing that advertising has picked up at many magazines, among the industries hit hard by the recession, after steep declines in the past couple of years. But it's not all magazines. While newsstand mainstays like Newsweek and Forbes continued to struggle, particularly big jumps in ad pages came in the category of celebrity mags, those breathless trackers of the stars in all their dating, divorcing, drunken-driving glory.
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran The Hartford Courant | July 18, 2004
To get a briefing on what's moving the market -- while the market is still moving -- surf on over to Briefing.com. There you'll find free access to several real-time news sources in the Silver Index. You might start with the Page 1 briefing, which offers a daily summary of stock and financial trends before the market opens. As the day continues, check on Stock Market Update, which takes a look at Wall Street trends every half hour. Bond Market Update does the same for investors in the credit markets.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Laurie Willis and Dan Fesperman and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Sierra Swann well knows of the various addictions that play out in the neighborhood near the corner of Boone Street and East 20th, a grim place where heroin and cocaine are available curbside beneath the blank stares of boarded-up windows. She watched a drug habit torment her mother to the point that she and five siblings were placed in foster homes by the time she was 13. But the fixation that brought Swann back to these streets time and time again was of a different sort, according to friends and family.
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran The Hartford Courant | July 18, 2004
To get a briefing on what's moving the market -- while the market is still moving -- surf on over to Briefing.com. There you'll find free access to several real-time news sources in the Silver Index. You might start with the Page 1 briefing, which offers a daily summary of stock and financial trends before the market opens. As the day continues, check on Stock Market Update, which takes a look at Wall Street trends every half hour. Bond Market Update does the same for investors in the credit markets.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 13, 2002
We already know who the biggest winner will be on Oscar night. His name is Sidney Poitier. On Jan. 24, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announced that Poitier would be given a special Oscar "for his extraordinary performances and unique presence on the screen" and for his "dignity, style and intelligence" as a representative of the movie industry. Poitier is the only African-American ever to receive an Academy Award in a lead acting category, when he took home a Best Actor Oscar in 1964 for Lilies of the Field.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 28, 2003
BEIJING - Just before Hu Shuli finished a journalism fellowship at Stanford University eight years ago and returned to China, a retired journalism professor kindly advised her that she should consider staying in America, where the rules of the system actually allow reporters to do their jobs. "He said that in China, being a journalist, maybe you can never reach the international [standard]," says Hu, 50. She decided to see whether she could do just that, setting a goal that seemed nearly unattainable in China: "You should write some news that you really consider is news."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 13, 2002
We already know who the biggest winner will be on Oscar night. His name is Sidney Poitier. On Jan. 24, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announced that Poitier would be given a special Oscar "for his extraordinary performances and unique presence on the screen" and for his "dignity, style and intelligence" as a representative of the movie industry. Poitier is the only African-American ever to receive an Academy Award in a lead acting category, when he took home a Best Actor Oscar in 1964 for Lilies of the Field.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.