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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
Morris P. Berke, a retired vending machine company owner who was active in the state Democratic Party, died of cancer yesterday at Marriott's Brighton Gardens of Pikesville. He was 86 and lived in Owings Mills. The owner of the Calvert Vending Co., a business in the 1000 block of W. Baltimore St. that supplied cigarette and candy machines, he was among a group of World War II ex-servicemen who organized the G.I. Veterans Taxicab Association in the 2300 block of Greenmount Ave. Family members said he helped secure the necessary permits from the Public Service Commission and the Packard vehicles the cab fleet used.
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NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | November 19, 2006
NEW YORK -- These days, if a part calls for someone to play brazen, caustic or swaggering -- in short, a real man's man -- one actor seems to have a lock on the role. At least that's how it appears from Alec Baldwin's near-ubiquitous presence lately portraying men like Jack Donaghy, the bombastic and preening network executive on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock. Baldwin calls them "man of authority" characters, "something you need to do sort of unflinchingly," he said during a lunch break on the show's Queens set in New York City, as he wolfed down a plate of rice and sauteed tofu.
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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis | January 24, 2002
TIMES ARE tough for the American geek. In the months since the terrorist attacks, we've been told over and over that Sept. 11 heralded the return of the manly man. Amid images of brawny firefighters storming into burning skyscrapers and cutthroat commandos roaming Afghanistan, the "real man" is back in demand and the skinny, cerebral type is as out of fashion as unmarked mail. Everywhere you turn, praise is being lathered on big guys like so much body oil. They are "men who charge up the stairs in a hundred pounds of gear and tell everyone else where to go to be safe," wrote former Ronald Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan.
FEATURES
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - Mark Moses seems like a regular guy. He coaches his young sons' soccer and baseball teams, he speaks adoringly of his wife of 16 years, and he sure likes to laugh. Then why does a woman interrupt his lunch at the Aroma Cafe in Studio City to belt out, "You're a murdering S.O.B."? Perhaps it's because Moses has quickly become Public Enemy No. 1 in the minds of some TV viewers. To them, he's Paul Young, the Desperate Housewives husband who dug out his swimming pool in the middle of the night after his wife ceremoniously killed herself in the pilot, set a toy chest afloat with "grisly remains" in a lake and committed his adolescent son to a psychiatric ward, where he ordered doctors to "forget the Freud and stick with the drugs."
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1993
Fabio, Fabio, Fabio. Italian love god. Your books, calendars and videos stir the passion of millions, but not all of that passion is the bodice-ripping, sultry-eyed, hot-flames-of-desire variety.We asked male readers to tell us what they thought of Fabio. Did they think he was intimidating, nauseating or boring?None of the responses was apathetic. Of the 53 calls we received, 21 were either from women (sorry, ladies, we said this poll was for men only) or were anonymous. Of the remaining 32 responses, 15 were negative, 16 were positive and one was mixed.
SPORTS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 1996
He had to rush through a news conference, juggle his schedule and cut short his meeting with the Italian president. But the First Fan shrugged off Monday's rainout to appear at Camden Yards yesterday, where he inaugurated the Orioles season by throwing out the ceremonial first pitch.As he did here in 1993, President Clinton threw a strike to Chris Hoiles, although, truth be told, he kind of lobbed it in.In 1993, Clinton confessed that he feared throwing the ball in the dirt. Hoiles urged him to just throw it nice and easy.
SPORTS
By PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS | December 31, 1999
NEW ORLEANS -- One crummy reception, for 7 stinking yards. For Florida State's Peter Warrick, that constitutes a forgettable quarter. So how brutal was it that he did it in the most watched game of the year?The illegal discount he received at a Dillard's department store might be easier to explain than those pedestrian numbers, which he posted in last January's seven-point Fiesta Bowl loss to Tennessee for the national championship.Instead of Warrick, it was Volunteers wide-out Peerless Price who swept the headlines.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 1, 2004
I'M NOT SURE when waiting for Deion became an existential experience, but it did create enough idle time at the Ravens' training complex yesterday to ponder a very important philosophical question. Who's The Man? Of course, everybody knows that Ray Lewis has been The Man around here for a long time, but the arrival of Deion Sanders - whom Lewis refers to as his big brother - has reopened the debate, and Lewis didn't do anything to clarify the matter when he referred to "Prime Time" as The Man yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | November 19, 2006
NEW YORK -- These days, if a part calls for someone to play brazen, caustic or swaggering -- in short, a real man's man -- one actor seems to have a lock on the role. At least that's how it appears from Alec Baldwin's near-ubiquitous presence lately portraying men like Jack Donaghy, the bombastic and preening network executive on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock. Baldwin calls them "man of authority" characters, "something you need to do sort of unflinchingly," he said during a lunch break on the show's Queens set in New York City, as he wolfed down a plate of rice and sauteed tofu.
NEWS
October 29, 1995
But seriously, folks, massage bust was a farceNo wonder morale in the police department is suffering. Imagine the cold sweats, the sleepless nights, the palpitating hearts. No, it's not another proud appearance before national TV cameras about lie detector tests given to rape victims, but the latest Keystone Kaper as officers soul search the very meaning of life itself. The brave few blue coil with anxiety, knowing in their hearts what they must do, that they must be willing to sacrifice, that, "Yes, OK, chief, I'll do it!
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 1, 2004
I'M NOT SURE when waiting for Deion became an existential experience, but it did create enough idle time at the Ravens' training complex yesterday to ponder a very important philosophical question. Who's The Man? Of course, everybody knows that Ray Lewis has been The Man around here for a long time, but the arrival of Deion Sanders - whom Lewis refers to as his big brother - has reopened the debate, and Lewis didn't do anything to clarify the matter when he referred to "Prime Time" as The Man yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder / Tribune | July 18, 2004
I CAN'T SHOP with my wife. The problem is that she almost never has a clear objective. I always have a clear objective. Without a clear objective, you're just wandering randomly around a store, which is not the point of shopping. This is not just my opinion: This is the opinion of literally thousands of Nobel Prize- winning scientists whose names are available upon request. These scientists have traced the origins of shopping back to prehistoric times, when "shopping" was called "hunting," and primitive man would make out his "shopping list" by drawing, on his cave wall, a picture of his objective, usually a large wad of meat in the form of, say, a yak. He would then go out into the wild, locate his objective, and make the "purchase" by whomping the yak on the head with a club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and By Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | November 3, 2002
The question must be asked: Why another biography of H.L. Mencken? Are there not, already, five substantial biographies of the fabled journalist and critic -- including a major work published in 1994, after researchers were given access to private papers kept sealed for decades after Mencken's death? Are there not, also, Mencken's five volumes of memoirs -- his three rollicking Days books and two examining his life as a newspaperman and magazine editor -- not to mention sundry monographs on aspects of his work?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
Morris P. Berke, a retired vending machine company owner who was active in the state Democratic Party, died of cancer yesterday at Marriott's Brighton Gardens of Pikesville. He was 86 and lived in Owings Mills. The owner of the Calvert Vending Co., a business in the 1000 block of W. Baltimore St. that supplied cigarette and candy machines, he was among a group of World War II ex-servicemen who organized the G.I. Veterans Taxicab Association in the 2300 block of Greenmount Ave. Family members said he helped secure the necessary permits from the Public Service Commission and the Packard vehicles the cab fleet used.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis | January 24, 2002
TIMES ARE tough for the American geek. In the months since the terrorist attacks, we've been told over and over that Sept. 11 heralded the return of the manly man. Amid images of brawny firefighters storming into burning skyscrapers and cutthroat commandos roaming Afghanistan, the "real man" is back in demand and the skinny, cerebral type is as out of fashion as unmarked mail. Everywhere you turn, praise is being lathered on big guys like so much body oil. They are "men who charge up the stairs in a hundred pounds of gear and tell everyone else where to go to be safe," wrote former Ronald Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan.
SPORTS
By PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS | December 31, 1999
NEW ORLEANS -- One crummy reception, for 7 stinking yards. For Florida State's Peter Warrick, that constitutes a forgettable quarter. So how brutal was it that he did it in the most watched game of the year?The illegal discount he received at a Dillard's department store might be easier to explain than those pedestrian numbers, which he posted in last January's seven-point Fiesta Bowl loss to Tennessee for the national championship.Instead of Warrick, it was Volunteers wide-out Peerless Price who swept the headlines.
NEWS
By Robert G. Kaufman | November 16, 1990
WILL THE gushing over Mikhail Gorbachev ever stop?Gorbachev has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize allegedly for "bringing about an end to the Cold War." He did not deserve it. Ronald Reagan did. By restoring America's confidence in itself and in the eyes of the world community, President Reagan contributed mightily to making glasnost and perestroika a begrudging necessity for Gorbachev.Reagan rightly considered U.S. military strength "a prerequisite of peace." His politically bold military buildup persuaded Gorbachev that the Soviets could no longer out-build or bully the United States they had done during the Nixon, Ford and Carter administrations.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder / Tribune | July 18, 2004
I CAN'T SHOP with my wife. The problem is that she almost never has a clear objective. I always have a clear objective. Without a clear objective, you're just wandering randomly around a store, which is not the point of shopping. This is not just my opinion: This is the opinion of literally thousands of Nobel Prize- winning scientists whose names are available upon request. These scientists have traced the origins of shopping back to prehistoric times, when "shopping" was called "hunting," and primitive man would make out his "shopping list" by drawing, on his cave wall, a picture of his objective, usually a large wad of meat in the form of, say, a yak. He would then go out into the wild, locate his objective, and make the "purchase" by whomping the yak on the head with a club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | January 10, 1999
Long before Dr. Ruth or Dr. Laura, before Abby or Ann or Miss Manners, someone had all the questions and all the answers. Before Freud, Einstein and certainly Andy Rooney, he had all the insight. He wrote Lady Di's life story almost 400 years before it unfolded. Bill's and Monica's, too.We're talking Shakespeare, a man who had something to say about almost everything, and whose simplest lines continue to hold meaning. "Out, damn spot!" might mean one thing to Macbeth, something else again to Bill Clinton.
SPORTS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 1996
He had to rush through a news conference, juggle his schedule and cut short his meeting with the Italian president. But the First Fan shrugged off Monday's rainout to appear at Camden Yards yesterday, where he inaugurated the Orioles season by throwing out the ceremonial first pitch.As he did here in 1993, President Clinton threw a strike to Chris Hoiles, although, truth be told, he kind of lobbed it in.In 1993, Clinton confessed that he feared throwing the ball in the dirt. Hoiles urged him to just throw it nice and easy.
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