Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReal Life
IN THE NEWS

Real Life

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | January 18, 1993
Although I watch few TV sitcoms, I've looked in on one because the main female character reminds me of an old friend.Maybe you've seen the show. It's called "Hearts Afire," and is on CBS on Monday nights.The female star is called Georgie Anne Lahti. She is blond, wears bangs and is a newspaper journalist.It happens that my old friend is named Georgie Anne Geyer, who is blond, used to wear bangs and is a real-life newspaper journalist.Ms. Geyer and I were both hired as young reporters by the Chicago Daily News in 1959.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Regarding a reader's question about why police officers shoot to kill, Baltimore City police and most other departments train there officers to shoot at the target's center of mass, which is the largest part of the body and where the bullet has the most stopping power ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Shooting at the center of mass does not always result in the suspect being killed. Officers assigned to specialized units such as SWAT teams and given additional firearms training may attempt to shoot a suspect in the leg or arm. However, these units are usually the last ones on the scene and most police involved shootings are over in a matter of minutes.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
Ronald Cuffie chuckled at the thought of Baltimoreans lining up this weekend to see Ratatouille, the new animated film about a rat in Paris who's an expert chef. Surely some of the city's moviegoers are responsible for the 25,000 service requests made each year to the city's "Rat Rubout" program, which removes the repulsive vermin from infested neighborhoods. "In the movies, rats are likable characters," said Cuffie, director of the city's vector control initiative. "In real life, people want to drop a brick on them."
NEWS
September 2, 2014
Reader Bruce Knauff asks why police shoot to kill rather than merely injure or maim ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Such questions come from people watching too many movies. Just like the CSI effect in courtrooms, people think the scenarios set up by Hollywood are plausible in real life. If you're close enough, it might be easy to shoot someone's leg when they're standing still and you are standing still. When you or they are moving, however, you have to aim at the largest part of the body, which is the torso.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
Reader Bruce Knauff asks why police shoot to kill rather than merely injure or maim ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Such questions come from people watching too many movies. Just like the CSI effect in courtrooms, people think the scenarios set up by Hollywood are plausible in real life. If you're close enough, it might be easy to shoot someone's leg when they're standing still and you are standing still. When you or they are moving, however, you have to aim at the largest part of the body, which is the torso.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Regarding a reader's question about why police officers shoot to kill, Baltimore City police and most other departments train there officers to shoot at the target's center of mass, which is the largest part of the body and where the bullet has the most stopping power ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Shooting at the center of mass does not always result in the suspect being killed. Officers assigned to specialized units such as SWAT teams and given additional firearms training may attempt to shoot a suspect in the leg or arm. However, these units are usually the last ones on the scene and most police involved shootings are over in a matter of minutes.
FEATURES
March 25, 1991
"Real Life Adventures," a comic that focuses on the little things that embarrass all of us, makes its first appearance today on Page 5D.
NEWS
By Linda DeMers Hummel | May 21, 1993
THE assignment was an essay by Suzan Shown Harjo, a Native American writer. Her subject: the desecration of her ancestors' graves by the American government."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 9, 1997
BOSTON -- My neighbor and I meet at the corner and exchange September greetings. She is dressed for this new year with a briefcase in one hand, a tugging schoolchild in the other.''Well,'' she says ruefully, pulled already in two directions, ''back to the real world.''We are home from vacation. The seaside house that she rents every year has been boarded up. It will linger in her mind over the long workaday winter as her sunlit Brigadoon -- the place where it is always August and her wardrobe is always a T-shirt.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 1, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Talk about life imitating art -- or at least getting all tangled up together. Tonight's "Real Life With Jane Pauley" (at 9:30, Channel 2) is devoted to an interview with actress Candice Bergen, a.k.a. "Murphy Brown."Does anybody else wish that interviewer and interviewee could switch roles so that Bergen, in her tough TV persona, could ask Pauley a good question?"Jane, you seem to be sitting pretty after all that nastiness with the 'Today' show and Deborah Norville and all. So exactly when do you get the evening anchor chair beside Tom Brokaw on a permanent basis?"
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | August 14, 2014
Although the summer season still has a few weeks left, the box office take thus far suggests that Hollywood's string of consecutive records likely ended last summer. While consumer tastes are notoriously fickle in the entertainment industry, I do give credit to Hollywood for trying to give consumers more of what they have wanted in the past. So, this season, we welcomed back old friends in new displays of derring-do as they saved humanity from various foes. There was Captain America appearing with the Winter Soldier, Falcon and the Black Widow.
NEWS
By David Horsey | July 15, 2014
Given the penchant of many of my fellow Americans to believe any preposterous spoof, spin or allegation that pops up on their computer screens -- I'm talking to you, Victoria Jackson! -- I want to make it perfectly clear that every statement in the next paragraph is false, no matter how much you may want to believe it's true. President Barack Obama visited a mosque and hosted Muslim leaders at the White House on the Fourth of July (false!). Obama also plans to host a Muslim gay marriage ceremony for St.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 3, 2014
His family doesn't know if Zack actually heard any of it firsthand. Maybe he was at that City Council meeting (some people swear he was) or maybe not. Either way, they figure he probably knew about the things that were said, how his neighbors in the small town of Norman, Okla., paraded to the microphone that evening in 2010 to denounce the proclamation of GLBT -- Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender -- History Month. They warned of a "slippery slope" to hate-crime laws, said gay people were out to "recruit" children, claimed 78 percent of all gay people have -- and die from -- sexually transmitted diseases.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Christian Nicholson of Columbia gave up a job as personal banker for his true calling, being dispatched via ambulance to help victims requiring immediate, sometimes life-saving attention. Meg Simmers of Baltimore felt a similar tug, leaving an air-quality management job. The two are members of the Howard County Fire and Rescue Services' 28th academy class, and on a recent Friday, they and about three dozen classmates took part in emergency training that included assisting a mock victim who had suffered a fall from an exercise machine at a gym. It was a fairly tame drill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Spies, sex, drugs and a beaming Ronald Reagan. Those are the elements for one of the most arresting scenes you'll see this year on television. It will air Wednesday night on "The Americans," one of the most talked-about series this spring on cable TV. The scene features a female Russian spy on a mission, a male congressional aide on cocaine, and Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell), the Soviet sleeper agent at the center of the FX series, breaking into a congressman's office safe late at night while the other two go at it under a portrait of the Great Communicator.
NEWS
By Arnold R. Isaacs and Arnold R. Isaacs,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1992
In Anne Arundel Community College's hotel and restaurant management courses, the emphasis is on preparing students for the real (and often unpredictable) world of the hospitality business."We always tell them, this is what the textbook will tell you -- and this is what happens in real life," says Faith Harland-White, who heads the program, now in its fifth year.A few minutes later, instructor Elaine Madden gives her own demonstration of the program's focus on practical details.Moving through the hubbub of the department's kitchen, where a couple of dozen students are busily making elaborate preparations for a benefit buffet dinner to be served later that day, Ms. Madden pauses next to one young woman who is halfway through chopping a small mountain of fresh garlic.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 26, 2007
Dan in Real Life? Let's hope not. This movie stars a funny guy. It was made by a director whose first film was the wickedly anarchic Pieces of April. The supporting cast includes such reliable names as Dianne Wiest, Emily Blunt and John Mahoney. Dan In Real Life (Touchstone Pictures) Starring Steve Carell, Juliette Binoche. Directed by Peter Hedges. Rated PG-13. Time 98 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
When the Irish-born novelist Colum McCann sits before a blank page, he launches himself into a vast, empty space. He's surrounded by fog on all sides, so he can't tell if his vehicle is right side up or upside down. The craft he's maneuvering is clunky, and the throttle sticks. No wonder the National Book Award-winning author felt compelled to write "TransAtlantic" about three fraught, historic journeys to Ireland in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first chronicles aviators John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, who in June 1919 made the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Home improvement shows are a mixed blessing, says Kent Drinker of Timberlake Building & Renovations. Drinker speaks from experience. The Annapolis-based project and client relations manager had his brush with television when his company was featured on a recent episode of HGTV's "Bang for Your Buck. " Although he hasn't seen a major effect on his business after the show aired in May, he says the industry has definitely been affected by images, trends and projects seen on home improvement shows.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.