Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReal Crime
IN THE NEWS

Real Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mitch Albom and Mitch Albom,Detroit Free Press | March 10, 1993
DETROIT -- Maybe you are lucky enough not to live in the lo end of the city, and so the idea of being someplace where drugs are used, or sold, or both, still seems shocking. It isn't. It happens all the time in Detroit.So it is really no jolt that Jalen Rose, a city kid, a Detroit kid, was in a house where drugs were found last October. This does not make him an addict. Or a user. Or a dealer. He is none of those. He is a city kid who has friends, old friends, from way before he wore that maize and blue uniform, and some of those friends are involved with drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Baltimore's Police and Fire unions pay more into their pension fund than any other city unions. When the city enacted legislation to basically freeze cost of living raises for fire and police until the age of 55 with a paltry 1 percent raise, then 2 percent at 62, it was not only age discrimination but breech of contract. They even froze cost of living increases for fire and police injured in the line of duty. What is so shameful about the whole thing is that the politicians still managed to fully fund their pension system while still giving daily cost of living increases to retired politicians.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Apparently Tavon White, the leader of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang at the Baltimore City Detention Center, has been running the prison for some time ("Corruption alleged at jail," April 24). To connect the dots between violent crime, simply follow the money - it leads to the group's drug trafficking. Power, and the money that generates it, drive illegal businesses. Excitement, money and power are pumped up on sound systems and flat screen TVs across the country. That makes it sexy to sell and use drugs and even to be a gang member.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
I was disappointed to see your informed and eloquent indictment of state and federal marijuana laws lead to the conclusion that Maryland should wait before legalizing the drug ( "One step at a time on marijuana," Nov. 20). When a drug policy becomes far worse than use of the drug could ever be, there is only one option: End the policy. The time for legalization is now. By every measure, the prohibition of marijuana has failed since it was instituted. It hasn't reduced use of the drug, it hasn't taken marijuana out of the hands of kids, it hasn't reduced crime.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Baltimore's Police and Fire unions pay more into their pension fund than any other city unions. When the city enacted legislation to basically freeze cost of living raises for fire and police until the age of 55 with a paltry 1 percent raise, then 2 percent at 62, it was not only age discrimination but breech of contract. They even froze cost of living increases for fire and police injured in the line of duty. What is so shameful about the whole thing is that the politicians still managed to fully fund their pension system while still giving daily cost of living increases to retired politicians.
NEWS
August 14, 1992
Another in the long string of outrages in this nation's biggest financial scandal -- the collapse of the U.S. savings and loan industry -- was on view last month as members of Congress jockeyed for position to posture once more for political gain on this issue. And posturing seemed to be all these incumbents cared about: No one was remotely interested in the fact that this wheel-spinning is costing taxpayers $6 million a day.If the grandstanding in the House Banking Committee continues through the end of the year, the delay could wind up soaking taxpayers for $1.4 billion.
NEWS
By Maria Allwine | July 22, 2008
As one of the members of the Baltimore Pledge of Resistance who has been spied on by the Maryland State Police, I feel it important that people understand we in the Pledge of Resistance are the most peaceful, nonterrorist-type folks you could ever hope to meet. We are committed to raising awareness about the destructive forces of violence in our society and our country, which is one of the reasons we have protested the invasion of Iraq since before it occurred. It is because we love and value this country so much that we work to make it better, and we start by insisting that those in power obey its laws.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
Time To InvestIn the midst of the thugs who looted, robbed, maimed and killed during the rioting in Los Angeles stood a core group of disappointed, disillusioned, hopeless, ignored people. The time has come to sincerely attempt to turn hopelessness into hopefulness.Former Rep. Parren Mitchell years ago proposed a type of economic food bank where contributions would be made to help those who want to help themselves, e.g., business persons and students, who would receive interest-free loans payable either in time or money.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
I was disappointed to see your informed and eloquent indictment of state and federal marijuana laws lead to the conclusion that Maryland should wait before legalizing the drug ( "One step at a time on marijuana," Nov. 20). When a drug policy becomes far worse than use of the drug could ever be, there is only one option: End the policy. The time for legalization is now. By every measure, the prohibition of marijuana has failed since it was instituted. It hasn't reduced use of the drug, it hasn't taken marijuana out of the hands of kids, it hasn't reduced crime.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
The City That Reads became the City That Bleeds. Get In on It became Get In on Crime. Now we have a new feel-good slogan for the city. A half-million dollars bought "Find Your Happy Place in Baltimore." It took just a few hours for a city cynic to post a comment to the Baltimore Sun's Crime Beat blog to turn that into "Find Your Trigger-Happy Place." Yes, Baltimore is enjoying a 33-year low in homicides. Shootings have fallen by more than half in the last year, from 225 during the first four months of 2009 to 102 from January through April this year.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Apparently Tavon White, the leader of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang at the Baltimore City Detention Center, has been running the prison for some time ("Corruption alleged at jail," April 24). To connect the dots between violent crime, simply follow the money - it leads to the group's drug trafficking. Power, and the money that generates it, drive illegal businesses. Excitement, money and power are pumped up on sound systems and flat screen TVs across the country. That makes it sexy to sell and use drugs and even to be a gang member.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
Mayoral challenger Otis Rolley visited the block where a 91-year-old woman was stabbed to death this week to charge that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake lacks a "real plan" to reduce crime. "Instead of providing leadership or proposing a real plan to make every neighborhood safer, she's running campaign commercials touting a drop in crime that began under another mayor," Rolley said Friday, outside Northeast Middle School. "She knows crime is too high, and she has no plan to make us safer.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Donnie Andrews' life is one that David Simon and Ed Burns would have had to invent if he hadn't already lived it. "I am the real Omar," Andrews tells me by way of introduction, referring to how he was the inspiration for the ruthless yet moral stickup man in the Simon and Burns HBO series "The Wire. " Omar Little didn't make it through "The Wire's" five-season arc. He was shot to death in the final season — as was a member of his crew, Donnie, who was played by Andrews himself in a bit part.
NEWS
By Phil Rogers | April 17, 2011
From the perspective of a citizen, not a baseball writer, it seems right for Barry Bonds to serve some jail time for his felony conviction on obstruction of justice. Some believe U.S. District Judge Susan Illston would be within her legal rights to throw out the conviction when she brings the participants from the 31/2-week trial back into her courtroom May 20. Maybe she will do that, but it seems Bonds deserves some real punishment, not just a slap on the wrist. Bonds thumbed his nose at the legal system, as he and hundreds of other steroid cheats had at baseball officials and fans in the years when there was no drug testing.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
The City That Reads became the City That Bleeds. Get In on It became Get In on Crime. Now we have a new feel-good slogan for the city. A half-million dollars bought "Find Your Happy Place in Baltimore." It took just a few hours for a city cynic to post a comment to the Baltimore Sun's Crime Beat blog to turn that into "Find Your Trigger-Happy Place." Yes, Baltimore is enjoying a 33-year low in homicides. Shootings have fallen by more than half in the last year, from 225 during the first four months of 2009 to 102 from January through April this year.
NEWS
By Maria Allwine | July 22, 2008
As one of the members of the Baltimore Pledge of Resistance who has been spied on by the Maryland State Police, I feel it important that people understand we in the Pledge of Resistance are the most peaceful, nonterrorist-type folks you could ever hope to meet. We are committed to raising awareness about the destructive forces of violence in our society and our country, which is one of the reasons we have protested the invasion of Iraq since before it occurred. It is because we love and value this country so much that we work to make it better, and we start by insisting that those in power obey its laws.
NEWS
By Jerry Large | July 27, 1999
YOU KNOW what it is the average American has most to fear in life, don't you?Well, sure, it's that late some night a teen-age black male will break into his house, rob him and beat him, all as a result of uncontrollable anger over being cut off in traffic earlier in the day.The poor average American then has to be flown to a hospital for surgery, but the plane crashes. Subsequently, he is given a blood transfusion, but the blood is tainted, infecting him with the AIDS virus.In the hospital, he is infected with a flesh-eating virus carried by an illegal-alien janitor.
NEWS
By Phil Rogers | April 17, 2011
From the perspective of a citizen, not a baseball writer, it seems right for Barry Bonds to serve some jail time for his felony conviction on obstruction of justice. Some believe U.S. District Judge Susan Illston would be within her legal rights to throw out the conviction when she brings the participants from the 31/2-week trial back into her courtroom May 20. Maybe she will do that, but it seems Bonds deserves some real punishment, not just a slap on the wrist. Bonds thumbed his nose at the legal system, as he and hundreds of other steroid cheats had at baseball officials and fans in the years when there was no drug testing.
NEWS
By Jerry Large | July 27, 1999
YOU KNOW what it is the average American has most to fear in life, don't you?Well, sure, it's that late some night a teen-age black male will break into his house, rob him and beat him, all as a result of uncontrollable anger over being cut off in traffic earlier in the day.The poor average American then has to be flown to a hospital for surgery, but the plane crashes. Subsequently, he is given a blood transfusion, but the blood is tainted, infecting him with the AIDS virus.In the hospital, he is infected with a flesh-eating virus carried by an illegal-alien janitor.
FEATURES
March 22, 1999
A real homicide investigation in Baltimore and a visit to the set of NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street" are among the features in "Behind the Badge," a scattershot documentary premiering tonight on the Learning Channel. Dennis Franz of "NYPD Blue" is host.In Part One, "On the Case," which airs from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., City of Baltimore Police Detectives Lynette Nevins and Mike Hammell investigate the shooting of a 19-year-old man in an alley on the city's east side. The problem with the show, though, is that just as you start to get interested in the case, the scene shifts to California and the efforts of a police officer in Orange County to solve another case there.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.