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By SUSAN OHANIAN | May 4, 1993
Schenectady, New York. -- Call me teacher. I wish I had a dime for every media pundit who continues to label ''A Nation at Risk'' a ''landmark document.'' The punditocracy can call it a landmark document till the cows come home; I call it a rumble-bumble smokescreen, a sham and an insult.''A Nation at Risk'' was nothing more than a political-industrial-university coterie blowing hot air on the uneasy Zeitgeist. It reflects, not a premise for educational change, but a mood of self-justification.
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NEWS
By Larry Hogan | October 9, 2014
As I've traversed the state of Maryland, I've learned that effective campaigning means clearly and honestly explaining to voters how your decisions in office would be better than those of your opponent. For Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, however, campaigning involves dodging accountability, remaining invisible on the campaign trail and hiding behind wildly off-base and false attack ads. Lieutenant Governor Brown is unable to defend his eight-year record of failure. He continues to try to distract voters by lying about my stances on long-settled issues, including abortion rights and gun laws.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 23, 2004
After 500,000 letters of complaint, eight months of threats, two Congressional hearings, two House and Senate bills and endless hours of testimony, federal regulators yesterday fined CBS a record $550,000 for showing Janet Jackson's bare breast during the Super Bowl halftime show. But for all the furious debate across the months, experts yesterday seemed split on whether television and society have been changed by Jackson's stunt and the reaction of the Federal Communications Commission to it. Yesterday's action by the FCC took the form of a unanimous vote by the five commissioners to slap each of the 20 CBS-owned stations - including Baltimore's WJZ-TV - for indecency with the maximum fine of $27,500.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Republican primary voters are blessed with the deepest field of candidates they've had for governor in a generation - four men who each bring compelling stories to their quests to replace Gov. Martin O'Malley. David Craig is the teacher turned legislator, mayor and county executive. Ron George is a one-time soap opera actor who is now a state delegate and (literally) a Main Street business owner. Larry Hogan is a former state cabinet secretary and son of the first Republican congressman to announce that he would vote to impeach Richard Nixon.
NEWS
October 26, 2005
Numbers-- Americans receiving jobless benefits totaled 2.89 million for the week Oct. 8, the highest reading in more than a year, the Labor Department said. Tip of the Week: Creating change in employee behavior If managers need "real" change to occur, they must become adept at helping their employees uncover their core motivation and the thoughts, emotions and habits that support or get in the way of change. We use Enneagram, a personality system that explores nine motivational strategies and helps individuals understand the "why" behind what they do. Once individuals are aware of that, they can decide whether to continue the old patterns or choose a new way.
NEWS
May 11, 1993
By the time it gets its foreign policy act together, which may be some time, the Clinton administration is going to have to reconsider Cuba. It won't be on the front burner, because other places are in crisis and smack the administration in the face. Cuba just festers. Meanwhile, the Cuba policy is slowly changing by inertia.What's happened is that the desertion of Cuba by the former Soviet Union has left the Communist island regime friendless and powerless and poorer by the minute. So powerless, it is ceasing to scare people.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barack Obama confessed to feeling like an American Idol or Survivor contestant when he shared a stage with nine other presidential contenders at a Democratic Party gathering that ended yesterday. None of the candidates made it to Hollywood or got voted off the island. Democrats interviewed afterward said the meeting, in effect the first audition of the 2008 contest, signaled a much more competitive contest than the early polls, which gave Hillary Rodham Clinton a big lead.
NEWS
By Larry Hogan | October 9, 2014
As I've traversed the state of Maryland, I've learned that effective campaigning means clearly and honestly explaining to voters how your decisions in office would be better than those of your opponent. For Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, however, campaigning involves dodging accountability, remaining invisible on the campaign trail and hiding behind wildly off-base and false attack ads. Lieutenant Governor Brown is unable to defend his eight-year record of failure. He continues to try to distract voters by lying about my stances on long-settled issues, including abortion rights and gun laws.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON - Fifteen years after Ronald Reagan rode into Washington vowing to slay a federal monster he viewed as wasteful and bloated, the Republican Congress is on the verge of finishing the job.Led by House Speaker Newt Gingrich - the driving force behind the conservative movement Mr. Reagan once commanded - today's Republicans have left Reaganomics in the dust. Not content with merely slowing government spending, they're rolling back more than a half-century of liberal social programs.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 27, 2012
The Oval Office isn't the place to learn on the job. That was the line from both Hillary Clinton and John McCain in 2008. In fairness, that's always the argument the more experienced candidate uses against the less experienced candidate (just ask Mitt Romney). But Barack Obama seemed a special case, easily among the least experienced major-party nominees in U.S. history. A Pew poll in August 2008 found that the biggest concern voters had with Mr. Obama fell under the category of "personal abilities and experience.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 25, 2013
Ted Cruz is no Joe McCarthy, as so many liberals bizarrely claim. But he might be the conservative Barack Obama. The charge that he's the new McCarthy is something of a compliment from liberals. It means they don't like him, can't really explain why and need to demonize him instead. In other words, he must be doing something right. For conservatives, the comparison to Mr. Obama probably stings more than the McCarthyite smear. But think about it. Both men have impeccable educational credentials.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 27, 2012
The Oval Office isn't the place to learn on the job. That was the line from both Hillary Clinton and John McCain in 2008. In fairness, that's always the argument the more experienced candidate uses against the less experienced candidate (just ask Mitt Romney). But Barack Obama seemed a special case, easily among the least experienced major-party nominees in U.S. history. A Pew poll in August 2008 found that the biggest concern voters had with Mr. Obama fell under the category of "personal abilities and experience.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 2008
MUMBAI, India - Facing mounting public anger over the response of his government and security forces to last week's assault on Mumbai, India's prime minister vowed yesterday to beef up anti-terror measures, and a top police official more pointedly fixed blame on a Pakistani group for the violence that left nearly 200 dead. But analysts and citizens alike questioned whether the government's promise of reform would lead to serious changes in an anti-terrorism effort whose systemic problems were laid bare by the assault.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 17, 2007
Julian Bond ought to have a word with Don Imus: "Thanks." Mr. Bond, the national board chairman of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said as much when he alluded to the embattled radio showman during opening ceremonies of the 98-year-old organization's annual convention last week. "While we are happy to have sent a certain radio cowboy back to his ranch, we ought to hold ourselves to the same standard," Mr. Bond said to enthusiastic applause.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barack Obama confessed to feeling like an American Idol or Survivor contestant when he shared a stage with nine other presidential contenders at a Democratic Party gathering that ended yesterday. None of the candidates made it to Hollywood or got voted off the island. Democrats interviewed afterward said the meeting, in effect the first audition of the 2008 contest, signaled a much more competitive contest than the early polls, which gave Hillary Rodham Clinton a big lead.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | February 12, 2006
Recent changes in two sections of The Sun reflect powerful forces that are shaping newspapers today - increased media competition and budget cuts. Change No. 1: The Sun has expanded Maryland news space by almost 33 percent. Two pages - one for Baltimore County and one for state news - have been added Tuesday through Saturday. Space also has been added to the Howard and Anne Arundel sections. The moves reflect a continuing circulation battle with The Washington Post in those counties and anticipated competition with the Baltimore Examiner, a free daily tabloid that plans to begin publishing in April.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | January 10, 1993
Annapolis. -- House Speaker Clay Mitchell will open the 1993 legislative session with promises of a more democratic style -- and with a power base so secure he won't have to deliver on those promises unless he really wants to.Having recently smashed a coup mounted by his highest ranking lieutenant, Mr. Mitchell now says openness and better "communication" will characterize his leadership.But he promises changes of substance as well.He proposes to begin an overhaul of state government. He wants to merge, consolidate and "rightsize" agencies to fit the income, if not the needs, of the 1990s.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | September 13, 1993
"The Bible: Designed to Be Read as Living Literature" was designed, simply, to be read as a book.Lodowick Allison, its latest editor, "owes a debt of gratitude" to Ernest Sutherland Bates, a former English professor who in 1936 undertook the job of converting the Bible to book form. An intimidating project -- now and then -- Mr. Allison says.Repetitions (what Biblical scholars call doublets), jumbled chronologies and confusions based on ancient misunderstandings were dealt with by Mr. Bates and upheld by Mr. Allison.
NEWS
October 26, 2005
Numbers-- Americans receiving jobless benefits totaled 2.89 million for the week Oct. 8, the highest reading in more than a year, the Labor Department said. Tip of the Week: Creating change in employee behavior If managers need "real" change to occur, they must become adept at helping their employees uncover their core motivation and the thoughts, emotions and habits that support or get in the way of change. We use Enneagram, a personality system that explores nine motivational strategies and helps individuals understand the "why" behind what they do. Once individuals are aware of that, they can decide whether to continue the old patterns or choose a new way.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 23, 2004
After 500,000 letters of complaint, eight months of threats, two Congressional hearings, two House and Senate bills and endless hours of testimony, federal regulators yesterday fined CBS a record $550,000 for showing Janet Jackson's bare breast during the Super Bowl halftime show. But for all the furious debate across the months, experts yesterday seemed split on whether television and society have been changed by Jackson's stunt and the reaction of the Federal Communications Commission to it. Yesterday's action by the FCC took the form of a unanimous vote by the five commissioners to slap each of the 20 CBS-owned stations - including Baltimore's WJZ-TV - for indecency with the maximum fine of $27,500.
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