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NEWS
July 16, 2012
Sure is encouraging to hear Senate Democrats supporting reducing taxes for small businesses by $29 billion until you realize they want to cut taxes for only those businesses that hire new workers, or give their current workers raises, or invest in new equipment this year. They believe this will encourage businesses - especially small ones - to hire again. Not likely. From the fourth quarter of 2007, when the recession officially began, to the end of 2009 (official end of the recession)
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
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BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | March 18, 1991
DEAR JOYCE: MY 14-year-old son has had the usual baby-sitting, grass mowing and lemonade stand experiences. I would like him to have a real business this summer. If he makes any money, fine, but the goal is the learning experience. Can you suggest appropriate small businesses a youngster can operate this summer? J.S.Few endeavors are less certain than small business so your ideas are right on target. If your son learns nothing more than how to bounce back after a disappointment, it will have been well worth the time investment.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College student Ethan Dietrich plans to make his idea for a technology company a reality through his energy, adaptability and passion - and a little help from mentors and investors at the TechStars Patriot Boot Camp at Goldman Sachs in New York. Dietrich, 32, of Odenton, was one of 50 veterans or active-duty military nationwide invited last month to the three-day boot camp of entrepreneurial education, mentoring and relationship building. TechStars chose Dietrich based on the business plan he submitted for SixGen LLC, a company that combines "big data," cloud computing and cybersecurity aspects.
NEWS
March 3, 1994
ScramblingWhen making judgments on the Clintons and the Whitewater affair, we must look deeper than the obvious facts that emerge from the scandal. People like the Clintons, coming up from the people, are upwardly mobile and politically ambitious. They cannot expect to acquire a fortune by thrift and savings from their income. If they do not have inherited wealth, they must invest. Once their political aims are known, they are caught up in a quagmire of deals and associations with financial experts whose function is to increase the campaign chest.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 23, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Now that they're pretty sure the stock market isn't going to crash again this October, frightening them the way it did 10 years ago, the members of the chattering classes can get back to looking down their noses at business once again."
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College student Ethan Dietrich plans to make his idea for a technology company a reality through his energy, adaptability and passion - and a little help from mentors and investors at the TechStars Patriot Boot Camp at Goldman Sachs in New York. Dietrich, 32, of Odenton, was one of 50 veterans or active-duty military nationwide invited last month to the three-day boot camp of entrepreneurial education, mentoring and relationship building. TechStars chose Dietrich based on the business plan he submitted for SixGen LLC, a company that combines "big data," cloud computing and cybersecurity aspects.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
Francis G. Bartlett Jr., 79, real estate Francis Gilpin Bartlett Jr., who owned an Easton real estate business, died of a stroke Jan. 12 at his home there. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised in Easton, he was the grandson of the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray, Episcopal bishop of Maryland from 1903 to 1929. Mr. Bartlett was a 1943 graduate of St. Paul's School and served in the Army's medical corps in the latter part of World War II. He then joined his father's Bartlett Realty Co. in Easton and later owned it until retiring in 2000.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 12, 1990
Edward H. Dickinson and Samuel F. Heffner Jr. recently formed the Airport Square Cos., a real estate development business that now controls all of the properties previously handled through Dickinson-Heffner Inc.Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Heffner have built more than 5 million square feet of commercial and industrial space in the past 25 years. Airport Square will control 3 million square feet, making it one of the largest real estate development and management companies in the state.Mr. Dickinson was involved in the initial assembling and development of the Hunt Valley Business Center.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
Sure is encouraging to hear Senate Democrats supporting reducing taxes for small businesses by $29 billion until you realize they want to cut taxes for only those businesses that hire new workers, or give their current workers raises, or invest in new equipment this year. They believe this will encourage businesses - especially small ones - to hire again. Not likely. From the fourth quarter of 2007, when the recession officially began, to the end of 2009 (official end of the recession)
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Cephas Richardson wanted to refinance a house along Lorraine Avenue in Charles Village. But instead of calling a bank, he called a number he saw on one of the "We Buy Houses" signs in the neighborhood. Richardson was told he could get a $100,000 refinance. All he had to do was show up at a building on Mulberry Street with $5,000 in cash. "I never went," said the vice bishop of Greater Jerusalem Church in Waverly. Richardson eventually got a $65,000 loan from a reputable lender and didn't let his house slip through his fingers.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
Francis G. Bartlett Jr., 79, real estate Francis Gilpin Bartlett Jr., who owned an Easton real estate business, died of a stroke Jan. 12 at his home there. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised in Easton, he was the grandson of the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray, Episcopal bishop of Maryland from 1903 to 1929. Mr. Bartlett was a 1943 graduate of St. Paul's School and served in the Army's medical corps in the latter part of World War II. He then joined his father's Bartlett Realty Co. in Easton and later owned it until retiring in 2000.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Robert Franklin Miller, a con artist who has posed as a chiropractor, a lawyer and a world karate champion, was convicted this week in connection with another fraudulent scheme. He pleaded guilty Tuesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to four counts of felony theft -- charges that stem from a phony real estate business he operated from the summer of 2001 through the spring of 2002. Miller is scheduled to be sentenced March 16 and under terms of the plea agreement could receive up to 12 years in prison.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2001
When Pat McIntyre Paul took her first real estate class, the instructor told her to look at the persons on her left and right. By the end of the year, the instructor said, one of them would no longer be in the business. That was 20 years ago, but the real estate industry's hefty turnover rate continues today, especially among those just starting out. In fact, Paul was one of the people who didn't make it. Trying to work as a part-time agent and raise her children at the same time was too difficult.
BUSINESS
By Bob Graham and Bob Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2000
As graduating college seniors come into their final days of campus life, their focus is turning toward the job market. Dot-com and high-tech jobs are wooing potential employees with the promise of stock options. School boards, in some instances, are luring teachers with signing bonuses and higher salaries. And nurses always seem to be in demand. Now take the residential real estate industry. It has been as hot as any sector for the past two years nationwide as well as in the Baltimore-metropolitan area.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
The name of the Ruxton church mentioned in yesterday's obituary on Hamilton H. Sanger was incorrect. It should have been the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd.The Sun regrets the error.Hamilton H. Sanger, a real estate and business investor, died April 22 in his sleep at the Charlestown Care Center in Catonsville. He was 86.Mr. Sanger had lived in Roland Park for 43 years before moving to the Charlestown Retirement Community in 1991.He was a Baltimore native and 1927 graduate of the Gilman School.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Cephas Richardson wanted to refinance a house along Lorraine Avenue in Charles Village. But instead of calling a bank, he called a number he saw on one of the "We Buy Houses" signs in the neighborhood. Richardson was told he could get a $100,000 refinance. All he had to do was show up at a building on Mulberry Street with $5,000 in cash. "I never went," said the vice bishop of Greater Jerusalem Church in Waverly. Richardson eventually got a $65,000 loan from a reputable lender and didn't let his house slip through his fingers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
William H. C. Wilson, founder and former president and owner of the venerable Roland Park real estate business W. H. C. Wilson & Co., which for generations has sold homes in Baltimore's more affluent neighborhoods, died Monday of kidney failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 78 and lived in Roland Park. Mr. Wilson, a quiet and modest man who favored conservative suits, sport coats and bow ties, was a highly regarded member of the Baltimore real estate community for more than four decades.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 23, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Now that they're pretty sure the stock market isn't going to crash again this October, frightening them the way it did 10 years ago, the members of the chattering classes can get back to looking down their noses at business once again."
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