Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReagan Years
IN THE NEWS

Reagan Years

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | March 10, 2005
Hometown: Frederick Current members: Michael Leigh, vocals; Karen Ellison, vocals, keyboard; Lenny Everett, vocals, bass; Glenn Riley, guitar, vocals; Sy Seyler; vocals, drums. Founded in: 1996 Style: '80s tribute band Influenced by: All types of '80s music, including new wave, hair metal, pop and rock. Notable: The Reagan Years sees itself as a tribute band -- not a cover band. In Seyler's words: "A cover band will play other people's material; a tribute band really tries to re-create the original recording."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | March 10, 2005
Hometown: Frederick Current members: Michael Leigh, vocals; Karen Ellison, vocals, keyboard; Lenny Everett, vocals, bass; Glenn Riley, guitar, vocals; Sy Seyler; vocals, drums. Founded in: 1996 Style: '80s tribute band Influenced by: All types of '80s music, including new wave, hair metal, pop and rock. Notable: The Reagan Years sees itself as a tribute band -- not a cover band. In Seyler's words: "A cover band will play other people's material; a tribute band really tries to re-create the original recording."
Advertisement
NEWS
December 4, 1991
Reagan years helped poor, middle classArthur Milholland's Nov. 29 letter, "Blame it on the military, tax structure", and your editorial policy, can no longer go unchallenged. It is time to debunk the canard that the rich got richer and the poor got poorer under Ronald Reagan.Income data from the U.S. Census Bureau and income tax data from the IRS reveal that, yes, the rich did get richer under Reagan, but so did the poor and the middle class.Data from two periods, 1974-1981, mostly Carter years, and 1981-1988, the Reagan years, indicate the richest 5 percent of taxpayers' income's grew 38.6 percent under Reagan while the incomes for the lowest 50 percent grew 17.9 percent.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 2004
The presidency of Ronald Reagan is widely credited with a muscular, assertive foreign policy that contributed to the downfall of the Soviet Union. But his response to a wave of terrorism in the early and mid-1980s - when there were far more terrorist attacks worldwide than in recent years - was far less consistent, historians and terrorism experts say. Reagan's reaction to the bloodiest anti-American attacks of the era - bombings in Lebanon in 1983...
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 2004
The presidency of Ronald Reagan is widely credited with a muscular, assertive foreign policy that contributed to the downfall of the Soviet Union. But his response to a wave of terrorism in the early and mid-1980s - when there were far more terrorist attacks worldwide than in recent years - was far less consistent, historians and terrorism experts say. Reagan's reaction to the bloodiest anti-American attacks of the era - bombings in Lebanon in 1983...
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A split between conservatives and the Bush administration deepened yesterday as a leading conservative think tank issued a report that strongly criticized President Bush's leadership.The Heritage Foundation, in its annual "State of Conservatism" report, accused Mr. Bush of abandoning the low-tax, anti-regulation agenda of the Reagan years and allowing Washington's "power elite" to dictate public policy."We know Ronald Reagan, and George Bush has shown he is no Ronald Reagan," said Edwin J. Feulner Jr., president of the Washington-based think tank.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 12, 1992
Los Angeles.--There are a couple of things worth remembering about politicians and journalists: They and we, or most us, know nothing about money.Except for the richest, politicians are people who spend a significant portion of their lives begging for money to finance their campaigns, in relatively small amounts -- $100 or $1,000 at a time. We reporters are, for the most part, schleppers living week-to-week on annual salaries from $25,000 to $75,000.Pols and the people who write about them generally share middle-class ignorance about money and its uses.
NEWS
November 25, 1991
If you ask a True Believer in Ronald Reagan what his greatest accomplishment was, most -- including Reagan himself -- will likely say, "he won the Cold War." As we survey the wreckage that was once the mighty Soviet Union, abjectly promising to pursue the principles of free-market democracy as the price of enough food to get through the bitter Russian winter, the claim takes on a superficial plausibility.From the vantage point of a 10-year perspective on the Reagan years, it is hardly deniable that this failed movie actor's policies did indeed hasten the demise of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | March 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Have the rich been getting richer and the poor been getting poorer in recent years?The liberal answer is yes. The conservative answer is no.In this election year, the suggestion of a dramatically increasing disparity in income provides powerful political fodder and provokes intense political argument.Already, the rich-getting-richer theme is being sounded loudly by Democrats in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail.The charges can only intensify as President Bush continues to push for more tax breaks for the wealthy.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
Reagan YearsThere he goes again -- Barry Rascovar and the "the failure of Ronald Reagan's economic theories in Washington" (column, Oct. 23).Do you call the greatest economic period in our history a failure? When the gross national product grew from $1.5 trillion to over $4 trillion?When government had available $0.5 trillion to, at the end, $1.5 trillion? When interest rates fell from 16 percent to 3 percent? When the richest 5 percent paid from 15 percent and at the end 22 percent?When 20 million jobs were created, of which one-third paid over $50,000, while Mr. Clinton has created 3 million jobs, of which 24 percent are under $7,000 a year?
FEATURES
By Lars-Eric Nelson and Lars-Eric Nelson,Special to the Sun | July 12, 1998
"Reagan on Leadership: Executive Lessons from the Great Communicator," by James M. Strock. Forum. 272 pages. $22.If a leader's abilities are measured by the number, fidelity and intensity of his or her followers, Ronald Reagan ranks as one of the all-time greats. It is not yet 10 years since he left Washington and already the city's airport and largest office building have been named after him. Harry S Truman, by contrast, has nothing. Republicans to this day vie for the right to assume Reagan's mantle and push his agenda: low taxes, less regulation, smaller government and a strong defense - even in the absence of any major enemies.
NEWS
By Walter S. Orlinsky | January 17, 1995
A FUNNY thing happened in the birthplace of Reagan-style supply-side economics. Orange County, Calif., one of the nation's richest and staunchest right-wing Republican communities, lost over $2 billion into the speculative black hole known as "derivatives."Serves 'em right.Their county treasurer was a hot-shot gambler passing himself off as a stock expert and regular guy. He even wore polyester pants.The Reagan years were marked by borrow and borrow, spend and spend. Something for nothing was its motto, and who cared about the debt -- "we can grow out of it," they said.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
Reagan YearsThere he goes again -- Barry Rascovar and the "the failure of Ronald Reagan's economic theories in Washington" (column, Oct. 23).Do you call the greatest economic period in our history a failure? When the gross national product grew from $1.5 trillion to over $4 trillion?When government had available $0.5 trillion to, at the end, $1.5 trillion? When interest rates fell from 16 percent to 3 percent? When the richest 5 percent paid from 15 percent and at the end 22 percent?When 20 million jobs were created, of which one-third paid over $50,000, while Mr. Clinton has created 3 million jobs, of which 24 percent are under $7,000 a year?
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | April 5, 1993
New York. -- Twenty-five years ago, on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to death as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis. He was 39 years old. What if he had lived?The first answer that comes to mind is that he probably would have been murdered a few months later. As Robert F. Kennedy was on June 5, 1968. He was 42 years old. And as John F. Kennedy was on November 22, 1963. He was 46 years old.The three assassinations in five years crippled a generation or more of Americans.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 12, 1992
Los Angeles.--There are a couple of things worth remembering about politicians and journalists: They and we, or most us, know nothing about money.Except for the richest, politicians are people who spend a significant portion of their lives begging for money to finance their campaigns, in relatively small amounts -- $100 or $1,000 at a time. We reporters are, for the most part, schleppers living week-to-week on annual salaries from $25,000 to $75,000.Pols and the people who write about them generally share middle-class ignorance about money and its uses.
NEWS
By Cokie Roberts | September 1, 1992
A WEEK ago Saturday, after the Republican convention, President Bush traveled to Woodstock in Georgia, home state of Democratic Sen. Wyche Fowler.The president told the crowd assembled on Main Street, "I stand for the balanced-budget amendment. Wyche Fowler is against it. I stand for the line-item veto. Wyche Fowler is against it. I stand for those who stood at Desert Storm and he opposed me . . . It's fine to talk one way in downtown Woodstock and vote differently in Washington, but we cannot have that anymore."
NEWS
By Cokie Roberts | September 1, 1992
A WEEK ago Saturday, after the Republican convention, President Bush traveled to Woodstock in Georgia, home state of Democratic Sen. Wyche Fowler.The president told the crowd assembled on Main Street, "I stand for the balanced-budget amendment. Wyche Fowler is against it. I stand for the line-item veto. Wyche Fowler is against it. I stand for those who stood at Desert Storm and he opposed me . . . It's fine to talk one way in downtown Woodstock and vote differently in Washington, but we cannot have that anymore."
NEWS
By Walter S. Orlinsky | January 17, 1995
A FUNNY thing happened in the birthplace of Reagan-style supply-side economics. Orange County, Calif., one of the nation's richest and staunchest right-wing Republican communities, lost over $2 billion into the speculative black hole known as "derivatives."Serves 'em right.Their county treasurer was a hot-shot gambler passing himself off as a stock expert and regular guy. He even wore polyester pants.The Reagan years were marked by borrow and borrow, spend and spend. Something for nothing was its motto, and who cared about the debt -- "we can grow out of it," they said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | March 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Have the rich been getting richer and the poor been getting poorer in recent years?The liberal answer is yes. The conservative answer is no.In this election year, the suggestion of a dramatically increasing disparity in income provides powerful political fodder and provokes intense political argument.Already, the rich-getting-richer theme is being sounded loudly by Democrats in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail.The charges can only intensify as President Bush continues to push for more tax breaks for the wealthy.
NEWS
December 4, 1991
Reagan years helped poor, middle classArthur Milholland's Nov. 29 letter, "Blame it on the military, tax structure", and your editorial policy, can no longer go unchallenged. It is time to debunk the canard that the rich got richer and the poor got poorer under Ronald Reagan.Income data from the U.S. Census Bureau and income tax data from the IRS reveal that, yes, the rich did get richer under Reagan, but so did the poor and the middle class.Data from two periods, 1974-1981, mostly Carter years, and 1981-1988, the Reagan years, indicate the richest 5 percent of taxpayers' income's grew 38.6 percent under Reagan while the incomes for the lowest 50 percent grew 17.9 percent.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.