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By James Risen and James Risen,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a significant government study of the economic consequences of the Reagan era to be released today, the Federal Reserve Board says the rich got richer while the middle class stagnated during the unprecedented boom of the past decade.The study -- the Fed's first, sweeping attempt to officially study changes in the distribution of wealth during the 1980s -- found that the incomes of affluent Americans rose more quickly throughout the decade than those of middle Americans. The disparity between the wealthiest Americans and the rest of the nation was even more evident in a comparison based on net worth, the Fed found.
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NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 3, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s views on abortion caused a stir this week, but another memo that surfaced from his years as a Reagan administration lawyer was notable for its strong support of the police. Alito wrote that he saw no constitutional problem with a police officer fatally shooting an unarmed teenager who was fleeing after a $10 home burglary. "I think the shooting [in this case] can be justified as reasonable," Alito wrote in a 1984 memo to Justice Department officials.
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FEATURES
By Andy Meisler and Andy Meisler,New York Times News Service | August 11, 1991
The Reagan era is over. But, proclaims Ronald Prescott Reagan, he hasn't had to take a job flipping hamburgers. Or serving as master of ceremonies at Republican fund-raisers. Or writing books, thinly veiled or otherwise, about his famous parents."I work in television. I'm sort of a quasi-entertainer," says the 33-year-old Mr. Reagan, the former ballet dancer best known as the younger son of the 40th president of the United States.In the past, on "Saturday Night Live" and "Good Morning America," that work has included dancing to rock music in his underwear; mounting a bucking bronco at a rodeo; and surviving for six days, alone with his video camera, on a desert island.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | December 9, 2001
When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan, by Peggy Noonan. Viking. 224 pages. $24.95. Peggy Noonan's What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era was neither a biography nor a history -- and therein lay its strength. Instead, it was just what its title proclaimed it to be: a vivid memoir by a bright, thoughtful woman who was lucky enough to have been in the right place at the right time, and who had the wit to show us Washington in the '80s through the prism of her own very interesting life.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Something happened during the go-go decade of the '80s: the rich got richer while the rest of the population seemed stuck in a rut.That conclusion was reached in the first comprehensive study of the distribution of wealth during Reagan era by the Federal Reserve Board.The study released today found that the incomes of affluent Americans rose more quickly throughout the decade than those of middle Americans. The disparity between the wealthiest Americans and the rest of the nation was even more evident in a comparison based on net worth, the Fed found.
NEWS
October 30, 1990
To say that Edward L. Blanton Jr., the GOP candidate for state attorney general, is a refreshing return to traditional Republicanism in Maryland is the understatement of the year in this turbulent political time. For much of the 1980s -- the Reagan era -- the state's party machinery was dominated by ideologues whose philosophy reflected a curious hostility to regulation of economic forces but a busybody determination to regulate people's personal affairs by dictating their cultural tastes or telling them how many children they must have.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | February 24, 1991
New YorkMemo to consumers bilked by deceptive advertising: It's time to put the Federal Trade Commission back in your Rolodex. If you complain, the commission might actually listen.The FTC's job is to pursue deception and fraud. During the Reagan years, however, the commission all but went out of business. One reason you see so many unsubstantiated health and environmental claims on products is that few national efforts have been made to tell advertisers no.Happily, the climate has changed.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | November 15, 1992
We're nearing the end of the Bush era in movies.In movies? Yes, that's right.Just as presidential administrations set the tone in such areas as education, energy and international diplomacy, they also seem to have a mysterious relationship with the national movie mood.The original "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), for example, was a telling emblem of the paranoid Eisenhower period, while the free-spirited "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961) seemed to reflect the optimism of the Kennedy years.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
There is nothing like a juicy scandal to get the thought waves stimulated and make us pay attention to the news.One by one the gossipy parts of the Nancy Reagan biography are oohed and chuckled over. Did she or didn't she? Did he or nTC didn't he? Oh, the fascination with the foibles of the famous.But, in the end, what does it all prove? Even assuming that most of it is true, what have we learned about Reagan or his presidency that we could not have known before? If as much interest had been paid during the early years of the Reagan era, the history of the last decade, and tomorrow, might have been different.
NEWS
By Steven Stark | May 2, 1991
AFTER 13 YEARS, an era in television ends Friday night: "Dallas" is closing its run. Still, the show will not be soon forgotten, for in its tenure, "Dallas" defined the culture and thus redefined us."Dallas" deserves a significant place in any history of television. It lasted longer than any other prime-time dramatic series except "Gunsmoke." The "Who Shot J.R.?" episode of 1980 is the second-highest-rated show in TV history.The show also made good despite violating several shibboleths about what makes a successful television series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | February 21, 1999
Footloose," the sleeper hit movie of 1984, is still an oft-referenced cult classic. Its spirit and amiability were and are enough to get even the most anti-A.M.-radio Gen-Xer to voluntarily listen to and even savor Kenny Loggins.The soundtrack, mainly the work of lyricist Dean Pitchford and composer Tom Snow, includes such Reagan-era gems as "Let's Hear It for the Boy," "Holding Out for a Hero" and, of course, Loggins' title track. It's like a time machine with a beat, transporting fans back to the days of breakdancing and pastels.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | November 15, 1992
We're nearing the end of the Bush era in movies.In movies? Yes, that's right.Just as presidential administrations set the tone in such areas as education, energy and international diplomacy, they also seem to have a mysterious relationship with the national movie mood.The original "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), for example, was a telling emblem of the paranoid Eisenhower period, while the free-spirited "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961) seemed to reflect the optimism of the Kennedy years.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | September 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Four years ago, Republican confidence about presidential politics was hinged on two facts:States with the fastest-growing populations were Republican and those with declining populations were largely Democratic. And younger voters -- those voting for the first time or those coming of age in the Reagan era -- wanted to keep a Republican in the White House.That latter trend appears to be reversing itself in this election year, as numerous polls indicate that 18-to-29-year-old voters, troubled by the slumping economy, are forsaking their Republican loyalties.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- One of the oldest axioms in politics instructs that a candidate should never "step on his own story." That was one of the reasons the Bill Clinton campaign decided to select its vice-presidential nominee in advance of the convention -- to make certain the decision did not take play away from the desired focus on Mr. Clinton, who needed some image repair here this week.All was going famously until yesterday, when Ross Perot dropped his bombshell in Dallas.The fallout of his decision not to run drifted quickly over Madison Square Garden and environs, where television coverage and corridor talk turned on a dime away from Mr. Clinton's big night and anticipated acceptance speech to what Mr. Perot's decision meant for Mr. Clinton's chances, and for the Democratic Party.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | April 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Reversing one of the most widely criticized policies of the Reagan administration, federal officials have agreed to reopen tens of thousands of cases in which the government denied benefits to people who said they could not work because of mental or physical disabilities.People who prove they were wrongly denied benefits could receive substantial back payments, anywhere from $3,000 a year to more than $6,000 a year, for up to 4 1/2 years of missed benefits.The new policy is set forth in the proposed settlement of a lawsuit involving more than 200,000 people in New York state.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A funny thing happened during the go-go decade of the '80s: the rich got richer while the rest of the population seemed stuck in a rut.That conclusion was reached in the first comprehensive study of the distribution of wealth during Reagan era by the Federal Reserve Board.The study released today found that the incomes of affluent Americans rose more quickly throughout the decade than those of middle Americans. The disparity between the wealthiest Americans and the rest of the nation was even more evident in a comparison based on net worth, the Fed found.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | September 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Four years ago, Republican confidence about presidential politics was hinged on two facts:States with the fastest-growing populations were Republican and those with declining populations were largely Democratic. And younger voters -- those voting for the first time or those coming of age in the Reagan era -- wanted to keep a Republican in the White House.That latter trend appears to be reversing itself in this election year, as numerous polls indicate that 18-to-29-year-old voters, troubled by the slumping economy, are forsaking their Republican loyalties.
NEWS
By James Risen and James Risen,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a significant government study of the economic consequences of the Reagan era to be released today, the Federal Reserve Board says the rich got richer while the middle class stagnated during the unprecedented boom of the past decade.The study -- the Fed's first, sweeping attempt to officially study changes in the distribution of wealth during the 1980s -- found that the incomes of affluent Americans rose more quickly throughout the decade than those of middle Americans. The disparity between the wealthiest Americans and the rest of the nation was even more evident in a comparison based on net worth, the Fed found.
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