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By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 27, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- President Bush flew into Cajun Country over the weekend to dispense a little more federal largesse, in this case by signing a federal energy bill that encourages offshore drilling that, by Bush's reckoning, would create 45,000 new jobs in the Oil Patch.The most obvious lesson in the president's appearance here -- and one quickly scheduled by Democratic nominee Bill Clinton -- is that the contest for Louisiana's nine electoral votes is far from over. And that, in turn, suggests troubles for Bush, who won the state with more than 54 percent of the vote four years ago.The national polls may show the race drawing somewhat closer in terms of the popular vote, but the president is still groping for a combination of states that could produce the 270 electoral votes needed to win. By this stage of the campaign, Bush should be spending his entire time in states like New Jersey, Michigan and Ohio that he must have.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 22, 2004
DETROIT -- Of all the swing states up for grabs on Nov. 2, none is more critical for Sen. John Kerry than Michigan. Because of its strong labor base and traditional party organizational base, the Democratic nominee can hardly afford a loss in this state. Put another way, perhaps the surest means for President Bush to nail down his re-election would be to deny Michigan and its 17 electoral votes to Mr. Kerry. Since the Depression, Michigan has gone Democratic in most presidential elections, though in 1980 and 1984 Ronald Reagan made deep inroads among blue-collar workers, thereafter known as the Reagan Democrats, and carried the state.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 29, 1992
EASTPOINTE, Mich. -- The phone rang recently at the Macomb County Democratic Committee headquarters and Leo LaLonde, the county chairman, took an unsolicited call from Charles Leibel, a self-proclaimed Reagan Democrat. Informing the chairman that he wanted to come back to the party, LaLonde recalls, the caller asked: "What's my penance?"Not all the Reagan Democrats who helped give Ronald Reagan 52 percent of the county vote in 1980, 66 percent in 1984 and 65 percent to George Bush in 1988 are ready to repent their sin of defecting to the Republicans over the past 12 years.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 10, 2002
WORSHIPING AT the altar of party unity, Maryland Democrats chose not to challenge Gov. Parris N. Glendening in 1998, though many were deeply unhappy with him. This year, they cleared the field for Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, though many of them thought her weak. They feared her campaign accounts and her name. Republicans would make the same calculations, they thought. But Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. saw something else. He would be running in a 2-1 Democratic state -- on paper. He knew the real posture of Maryland voters was far less Democratic.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
WARREN, Mich. -- President Bush, belly up to the bar here at Len's Place, across from the huge General Motors transmission plant, and say hello to Bill Tidwell.You don't know Bill, but he, and countless other one-time Reagan Democrats like him, voted for you in 1988. And they probably will decide here in recession-wracked Michigan whether you can win again in a state that is critical to your chances of re-election.You need the Bill Tidwells, and right now they don't feel great about you. Listen to him as he sips a drink and pours out his feelings:"I want Clinton in. Bush isn't worth anything.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | March 15, 1996
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - When Sen Bob Dole came here yesterday in an anti-climactic bid for Michigan's 57 national convention delegates, the celebratory mood was a far cry from what had been been expected less than four weeks ago. Then, after his defeat in New Hampshire by Pat Buchanan, Tuesday's Michigan primary loomed as an acid test for both men.The state's history in presidential politics includes Alabama Gov. George Wallace's 1972 victory in the Democratic...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 1996
FLOSSMOOR, Ill. -- President Clinton dropped in yesterday on two Midwest battleground states that would be crucial in the event of a close election -- and made an aggressive pitch for the "Reagan Democrats" and independents whose support could help guarantee him a second term.On the surface, there was nothing extraordinary about his trip to Michigan and Illinois. In both states, the president delivered what has become his standard stump speech. In it, Clinton recounts the positive economic figures coming out of Washington, boasts of signing legislation such as family leave and a health care bill his wife once dismissed as "incremental," and asks his audiences to help him "build a bridge to the 21st century."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1996
MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich. -- Here in predominantly blue-collar Macomb County, storied as "home of the Reagan Democrats," its claim to that title is tenuous at best as another presidential election approaches.According to Gov. John Engler, a Republican who swept 70 percent of the county's vote in his 1994 re-election, the factory-working Democrats who flocked to Ronald Reagan in 1980 "are now Engler Republicans." They have dropped their longtime identity with the Democratic Party, he says, and have at last embraced the Republican banner.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer Staff writer John Fairhall of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 2, 1992
With his party O-for-2 in recent presidential elections in Maryland and with a fresh poll suggesting another close race this year, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton opened his campaign here last night at a flag-decorated softball stadium in Anne Arundel County."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
DETROIT -- Three critical Michigan voting blocs -- labor, blacks and Reagan Democrats -- are up for grabs Tuesday in a key Rust Belt presidential primary that could all but settle the nomination races in both parties.All three groups are without their favorite candidate on the ballot and are the focus of lively competition for their support, particularly among the Democrats -- Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas, the front-runner in the polls, former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts and former Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown of California.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 30, 2000
SAGINAW, Mich. - In the state where the automobile is king, auto industry workers may well hold the key to the close battle between Gov. George W. Bush of Texas and Vice President Al Gore for Michigan's 18 electoral votes. It was particularly notable, then, that Bush, in a major energy-policy speech here yesterday asserted that Gore "calls auto workers his friends" but "in his book, he declares the engines they make an enemy." The reference was to Gore's comment in his 1992 book, "Earth in the Balance," that the combustion engine was "a mortal threat to the security of every nation" in its reliance on gasoline fuel.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party suffered serious defections in both the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections because of the perception that Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis had made too many concessions to Jesse Jackson.The perception wasn't accurate but that was beside the point. The operative thing was that many middleclass white voters -- these were the "Reagan Democrats" -- believed the black civil rights leader enjoyed too much influence on their party.These days, the Republican Party is in precisely the same position in dealing with leaders of the religious right.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party suffered serious defections in both the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections because of the perception that Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis had made too many concessions to Jesse Jackson.The perception wasn't accurate but that was beside the point. The operative thing was that many middle-class white voters -- the "Reagan Democrats" -- believed the black civil rights leader enjoyed too much influence in their party.These days, the Republican Party is in precisely the same position in dealing with leaders of the religious right.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- If you were among those few Americans who watched the town meeting on race relations from Akron, Ohio, the other day, you saw the essence of President Clinton.A schmoozerMr. Clinton has always been a politician who loves to schmooze about issues and he was clearly in his element serving as the discussion leader in a meeting that, to no one's surprise, ran a half-hour longer than the scheduled 90 minutes. And Mr. Clinton also has been a politician who believes that it is possible to find common ground on questions that others consider irreconcilable.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 1996
FLOSSMOOR, Ill. -- President Clinton dropped in yesterday on two Midwest battleground states that would be crucial in the event of a close election -- and made an aggressive pitch for the "Reagan Democrats" and independents whose support could help guarantee him a second term.On the surface, there was nothing extraordinary about his trip to Michigan and Illinois. In both states, the president delivered what has become his standard stump speech. In it, Clinton recounts the positive economic figures coming out of Washington, boasts of signing legislation such as family leave and a health care bill his wife once dismissed as "incremental," and asks his audiences to help him "build a bridge to the 21st century."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1996
MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich. -- Here in predominantly blue-collar Macomb County, storied as "home of the Reagan Democrats," its claim to that title is tenuous at best as another presidential election approaches.According to Gov. John Engler, a Republican who swept 70 percent of the county's vote in his 1994 re-election, the factory-working Democrats who flocked to Ronald Reagan in 1980 "are now Engler Republicans." They have dropped their longtime identity with the Democratic Party, he says, and have at last embraced the Republican banner.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | February 27, 1992
THIS IS THE YEAR of the anti-hero. Who would have dreamed that the rallying points of voter discontent would be a pugnacious bully named Pat Buchanan and an academic nerd called Paul Tsongas with a silent T.Forget electability. That's not the issue here. What matters is that the people are singing songs of angry men. Mr. Buchanan has made high fashion out of straight-talking bigotry and isolationism.And Mr. Tsongas has raised the level of non-charisma to new heights of respectability and middlebrow chic.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | March 15, 1996
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - When Sen Bob Dole came here yesterday in an anti-climactic bid for Michigan's 57 national convention delegates, the celebratory mood was a far cry from what had been been expected less than four weeks ago. Then, after his defeat in New Hampshire by Pat Buchanan, Tuesday's Michigan primary loomed as an acid test for both men.The state's history in presidential politics includes Alabama Gov. George Wallace's 1972 victory in the Democratic...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's plan for a national service corps is moving with dispatch through Congress, but it is quietly transmuting into something a bit different from the one that candidate and then President Clinton so frequently described to enthusiastic crowds.Showing the effects of strong political and social forces, the program, which was approved by committees in both the House and Senate yesterday, is no longer primarily a way for middle-income young people to earn money for college while doing socially useful work.
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