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By DAN BERGER | April 11, 1991
The Kurds deserve something better than the reinvention of Indian reservations in Iraq.Queen Elizabeth will attend the Orioles, who need all the help they can get.Contrary to what you may have read or heard lately, the First Lady's social life was not -- rpt, not -- the most interesting aspect of the Reagan administration.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Here are five words that I never expected to put together in the same sentence: Bill Clinton owes Rush Limbaugh. Yes, it was El Rushbo, hero of the right, who leaked word via his national radio show that the Clinton administration, target of the right, was about to be trashed in ABC's docudrama The Path to 9/11. Actually, Mr. Limbaugh's leak was more of a gusher. Boasting that the screenwriter, Cyrus Nowrasteh, is a friend of his, Mr. Limbaugh said the movie "indicts the Clinton administration, Madeleine Albright, Sandy Berger.
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NEWS
October 10, 1991
Predictably, the Wall Street Journal screamed "character assassination" in its editorial comment on this week's guilty plea by Elliott Abrams, one of the Reagan administration's fiercest ideological warriors. Abrams pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts of withholding information from Congress about secret administration efforts to aid the Nicaraguan contras. He also agreed to cooperate with the independent prosecutor, Lawrence Walsh, in his probe of the Iran-contra scandal and other high-level wrongdoing during the Reagan administration.
NEWS
By CLAUDIA LUTHER and CLAUDIA LUTHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2006
Caspar W. Weinberger, the anti-Soviet hawk who oversaw the nation's huge peacetime military buildup as the defense secretary during most of President Ronald Reagan's two terms, died yesterday of pneumonia. He was 88. Mr. Weinberger, who also had prominent roles in the Nixon and Ford administrations, died in a hospital in Bangor, Maine, with wife Jane, son Caspar Jr. and daughter Arlin by his side, according to Forbes magazine, where he served as chairman. "I was deeply disturbed to learn of the death of a great American and a dear friend," former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said in a statement.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | April 23, 1991
Boston -- WILLIAM CASEY, President Reagan's director of central intelligence, made a secret trip to Baghdad in March 1982. After his visit the United States removed Saddam Hussein's Iraq from the list of countries supporting terrorism -- a decision that allowed Iraq to acquire sensitive U.S. technology.But the Reagan administration knew that Iraq was in fact still sponsoring terrorism, paying for it, supplying the tools of murder. One terrorist organization, operating as an instrument of Iraqi military intelligence, carried out bomb attacks on American, Israeli and Jewish targets around the world.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | October 8, 1990
THERE HAS BEEN much soul-searching since Aug. 2 about failures of American policy that helped to encourage Saddam Hussein's aggression. But not enough attention has been paid to the man whose folly led the way: Ronald Reagan.In three significant ways, President Reagan gave the Iraqi leader reason to believe that he did not have to worry about American opposition. Reagan played down human rights concerns, winking at horrendous cruelties by Saddam Hussein. He destroyed U.S. energy policy, making us more vulnerable to oil threats.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | March 2, 2003
JOHN Dimitri Negroponte, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has been appearing a lot these days to accuse Saddam Hussein of hiding the truth and covering up the threat he poses to the world. Whenever Negroponte speaks of lies and deceptions, I can't help thinking there's something wrong with this picture. Not that Hussein isn't dangerous and lying about what he has and where it is. I'm sure he's lying and concealing and dangerous. What's wrong with the picture is Negroponte, who has engaged in deception and covering up in his time.
NEWS
December 10, 1991
If ever there were any doubt as to whether allegations of secret deals between Reagan campaign operatives and the Iranian outlaws to rig the 1980 election should be investigated by Congress, that doubt surely was removed by the disclosures by New York Times reporter Seymour Hersh (The Sun, Dec. 8) that massive shipments of weapons to Iran were secretly initiated within weeks after the Reagan administration came to office.No longer are we talking about just speculation raised by witnesses of dubious credibility; Hersh is quoting the highest ranking officials of the Reagan administration in confirming the secret policy of supplying arms to Iran through the eager conduit of Israel.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
The unearthing -- literally -- of a body buried a decade ago in Honduras is one of the keys unlocking another sordid tale of U.S. complicity in political murders in Latin America. A series of articles which continues today, the product of a 14-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun, reveals a sickening tale of mayhem and murder by Honduran death squads financed and abetted by the Reagan administration in the '80s.Honduras was a valuable base camp for the Reagan administration and its CIA operatives to fight communism elsewhere in Central America.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As vice president during the Reagan administration, President Bush acted as an intermediary in sending strategic military advice to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein at a critical point in the Iran-Iraq war, according to sources and classified documents.The specific advice -- that Iraq unleash its air force against Iran -- was passed on during a trip to the Mideast by then-Vice President Bush in August 1986. Mr. Bush used Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to relay the message to Mr. Saddam, according to two Bush administration officials familiar with the incident.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
Michael Evans, 61, a photojournalist who captured an iconic image of a grinning Ronald Reagan wearing a worn cowboy hat, died Thursday at his Atlanta home. He had suffered from cancer for several years. In 1975, while covering Mr. Reagan's unsuccessful campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, he took the famous picture of the future president, which ran on the covers of Time, Newsweek and People magazines after the president's death last year. After Mr. Reagan defeated Jimmy Carter in 1980, Mr. Evans became the new president's personal photographer.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Senate Democrats renewed their request to see 16 files of documents on John G. Roberts Jr., President Bush's nominee for chief justice of the United States, arguing yesterday that the Reagan administration released similar documents when it nominated William H. Rehnquist to that position in 1986. Current administration officials countered that the two situations were dissimilar, that more than 60,000 pages of documents have been released and that the Democrats' request was unreasonable.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | February 22, 2005
`DUTIFUL" IS A word this newspaper used Sunday to describe John Dimitri Negroponte, the 65-year-old career diplomat President Bush named last week to be the first director of national intelligence. It was in an editorial that otherwise had little good to say about the man, and I think the word best characterizes the image that comes to mind when Mr. Negroponte is mentioned. He is a dutiful servant. One thinks of him as America's representative to the United Nations, sitting dutifully behind Colin L. Powell as the secretary of state testified incorrectly about the threat Iraq posed to the world.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - "Is David Stockman on the list?" one harried volunteer asked another in the Reagan funeral offices at the Mayflower Hotel. "It's being worked on," the second volunteer replied, acknowledging that there had been some "oversights" in invitations to former President Ronald Reagan's national service at the Washington National Cathedral tomorrow. So was it possible that Stockman, the Reagan administration budget director reviled at the White House for his tell-all tales that Reagan's supply-side economics did not work, had not been invited?
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 2004
The presidency of Ronald Reagan is widely credited with a muscular, assertive foreign policy that contributed to the downfall of the Soviet Union. But his response to a wave of terrorism in the early and mid-1980s - when there were far more terrorist attacks worldwide than in recent years - was far less consistent, historians and terrorism experts say. Reagan's reaction to the bloodiest anti-American attacks of the era - bombings in Lebanon in 1983...
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Ronald Reagan inherited a bad economy in the 1980s and made it better. That legacy endeared him to many Americans, but what he did and how he did it remain highly controversial two decades later. In slashing tax rates, building up the Pentagon budget and pushing deregulation, Reagan put his country and his party on a new economic path. And now, in a new century, the same battles over his economic philosophy are being fought again. The Republican Party has embraced the Reagan tax-cutting message as party dogma, emphasizing a lighter tax burden over reducing deficits.
NEWS
By Clifford Krauss and Clifford Krauss,New York Times News Service | March 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Reagan administration knew more tha it publicly disclosed about some of the worst human rights abuses in El Salvador's civil war and withheld the information from Congress, declassified cables and interviews with former government officials indicate.Charges that the Reagan administration, and to a lesser extent the Carter and Bush administrations, may have covered up evidence of abuses to win congressional approval of about $6 billion in aid were revived with the release last week of a United Nations-sponsored report documenting widespread human rights violations by the Salvadoran military.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Senior Reagan administration officials believed in 1981 that about 100 U.S. POWs could have been left behind in Southeast Asia at the end of the Vietnam War, but efforts to rescue them were abandoned after a covert reconnaissance mission mounted by the CIA failed to find them, documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times show.The belief that, contrary to official policy statements, U.S. prisoners were still being held in Southeast Asia was based in part on a satellite photograph of a Laotian prison camp that the Reagan administration received shortly after taking office in January 1981.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 7, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - It seemed like a good idea at the time. The Bush administration would use the earthquake tragedy in Iran that killed at least 30,000 people not only as an opportunity to show the United States was eager to alleviate international tragedy, but also as a diplomatic wedge. Some officials believed that as humanitarian aid was provided, discussions might open that could lead to a new relationship between the two countries. President Bush stated the potential political benefits of the aid when he said, "What we're doing in Iran is we're showing the Iranian people that American people care, that we've got great compassion for human suffering."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - The trials of Saddam Hussein and other Iraqi leaders could produce embarrassing reminders of past American support for his government and of the West's failure to punish him despite mounting evidence of Iraqi atrocities. Lawyers familiar with war crimes trials say attorneys for Hussein and his aides might try to introduce damaging evidence against Western leaders as a pressure tactic against their accusers or to shift responsibility away from the dictator's actions. The tactic is unlikely to work in his favor, they said, because Hussein's defense team would have a hard time persuading a tribunal that such evidence is relevant in judging whether he was responsible for war crimes, genocide or human rights abuses, the charges likely to be leveled against him. Nevertheless, the prospect that he will try to implicate other nations presents a powerful reason for the United States not to appear to be orchestrating the trial, said Diane Orentlicher, an international justice specialist at American University's Washington College of Law. "It underscores the importance that this not be seen as an American stage-managed process," Orentlicher said.
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