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By Jules Witcover | February 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- You may have missed it, but in advance of President's Day the Gallup Organization repeated its annual poll asking voters: "Whom do you regard as the greatest U.S. president?" No, the winner wasn't Abraham Lincoln or George Washington. It was none other than Ronald Reagan. Maybe the fact that the Great Emancipator is long dead, and the poll was taken amid much publicity about the Great Communicator's 90th birthday, had something to do with the result. Whatever the reason, Mr. Reagan was the choice of 18 percent of 1,016 respondents 18 and over, to 16 percent who named John F. Kennedy and only 14 percent for Lincoln.
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NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 1, 2014
 For more than 60 years with hardly a break, the Republican Partyhas chosen as its standard-bearer someone who has been able to claim it's his turn. Not since military hero Dwight D. Eisenhower defeated Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio, whose supporters so contended in 1952, has a conspicuous outsider run away with the prize. Patience nearly always has been rewarded for party stalwarts, whether it was Richard Nixon in 1960, Barry Goldwater in 1964, Nixon again in 1968, Gerald Ford in 1976, Ronald Reagan in 1980, the senior George Bush in 1988, Bob Dole in 1996, the junior George Bushin 2000, John McCain in 2008 or Mitt Romney in 2012.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | April 27, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Talleyrand's wisdom in expressing the sensibility of conservatism -- "Above all, gentlemen, no zeal" -- is unintelligible to some profoundly unconservative conservatives who advocate madly multiplying honors for Ronald Reagan. How many ways are there to show misunderstanding of Mr. Reagan's spirit? Let us count the zealots' ways. Not content with seeing Mr. Reagan's name attached to Washington's National Airport and to Washington's second (to the Pentagon) largest building and to an aircraft carrier, some people want -- seriously -- some sort of Reagan honor in all 3,141 American counties.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 18, 2014
 President Obama's yearning to become a peacetime president continues to be frustrated by the reality on the ground in the Middle East, and by Republicans' zeal to capitalize on it politically at home. The disintegration of Iraq, the emergence of a new extremist "Islamic State," a deepening of the Israeli-Palestinian stalemate and more Russian mischief in Ukraine all have combined to challenge the Obama Doctrine of selective use of power in foreign policy. As the Middle East crumbles, the GOP'swould-be 2016 presidential hopefuls have commenced kibitzing.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | April 29, 1991
Washington -- WHAT DIFFERENCE whether Nancy and Ol' Blue Eyes hanky-panked in White House nooners? They deserve each other in any case.Far more interesting is how President Reagan got away with an eight-year gig as colossus of the American scene.Lou Cannon, the reporter who covered him longest and best, lays out the theatrical illusions that framed his life and presidency in a new book, "President Reagan -- the Role of a Lifetime."Cannon all but ruptures himself with generosity to his inert subject, lavishing praise on Reagan for rekindling national pride and crediting his military build-up for ending the Cold War. Historians are likely to disagree.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | August 18, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- It's a measure of the strong hand that Democrats believe they hold this year that they feel free to criticize the once untouchable Ronald Reagan, embrace the once invisible Jimmy Carter and try to turn attacks on marital infidelity into points for their side.As Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton is home in the state capital watching the Republicans meet in Houston, he has authorized his campaign to use every opening to blunt the GOP message this week.Probably the toughest job is to turn attacks against Mr. Clinton's character into positive points, but a fresh promise by President Bush to fire any of his operatives who dealt in personal attacks provided some ammunition.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 5, 1993
A vote by former President Reagan for Bill Clinton for president surely belongs in the wonders-never-cease department, but a top Clinton inaugural official insists that's what Mr. Reagan did on Election Day."Use this only without attribution," the official told TV Guide for an article in the issue on newsstands yesterday."But remember when Clinton stopped to see Reagan [on Nov. 27] and got those jelly beans? How friendly they were? Well, Reagan voted for Clinton. I have it on the highest authority."
NEWS
By Newsday | January 4, 1993
A vote by former President Reagan for Bill Clinton fo president surely belongs in the wonders-never-cease department, but a top Clinton inaugural official insists that's what the Gipper did on Election Day."Use this only without attribution," the official told TV Guide for an article in the issue on newsstands today. "But remember when Clinton stopped to see Reagan [Nov. 27] and got those jelly beans? How friendly they were? Well, Reagan voted for Clinton. I have it on the highest authority."
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | March 17, 1994
In October 1947, Ronald Reagan testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings on communist influence in Hollywood. He "created something of a stir," according to a report in Motion Picture Daily, with his "affirmation of . . . American democracy, in and out of Hollywood."But, writes University of Wisconsin communications professor Stephen Vaughn in his absorbing -- but unsettling -- study of Mr. Reagan as actor-politician, Mr. Reagan was an informer for the FBI, complete with a code name, "T-10."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | May 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, a Republican presidential contender who favors abortion rights, said in a televised debate last night that it would be "OK" if the Supreme Court overturned the landmark ruling that established a constitutional right to abortion. Giuliani, the early front-runner in the polls, said he believes that abortion is a matter that should be left to a woman's conscience, but he also said that states could make their own decisions about whether to outlaw the procedure.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
I very seldom find that I agree with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column, but I heartily endorse his last sentence, "Where's our Reagan?" ( "Drawing insults, not fear, from our foes," March 30). If President Barack Obama's administration had the same IRS tax rates as did President Ronald Reagan, the United States would have close to a $1 trillion budget surplus rather than a $600 billion deficit. How is that possible? Well, if we compare Mr. Obama's sixth year in office with Mr. Reagan's sixth year in office, we find that under President Obama the highest tax bracket is 39.5 percent whereas under President Reagan the highest tax bracket was 50 percent.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Southwest Airlines won 54 slots recently vacated amid federal litigation at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, expanding its already-large presence in the region. The airline said its pending growth at Reagan, where its number of daily departures is expected to balloon from 17 to 44, will not impact existing schedules or routes out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport. "We have about 240 flights a day from BWI, and we're not expecting that to change," said Dan Landson, a Southwest spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The Transportation Security Administration identified and seized more firearms at U.S. airports in 2013 than in any year since records have been kept - including more than two dozen at airports in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. Nationwide, the TSA caught 1,813 guns at airport checkpoints in 2013, a 16.5 percent increase over the 1,556 guns it captured in 2012, it announced Friday. The TSA screened nearly 639 million passengers in 2013, about 1.1 million more than last year.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 5, 2013
It's no secret that the right is going through what some call a healthy debate and what others see as an identity crisis. For some, the solution to what ails conservatism requires a sudden philosophical shift leftward to win back the last Rockefeller Republicans, presumably hanging on in nursing homes like stranded Japanese fighters who haven't gotten word that World War II is over. Others argue that Republicans must shake off the heresies of moderation and compromise and accept the unalloyed true faith of 100 percent conservatism.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Many Baltimoreans declare that their morning commute only becomes bearable when tuned into the crazy antics of WWMX-FM morning radio host Reagan Warfield. He regularly interviews world-famous celebrities and rock stars and banters with a widespread listening audience, but his most popular calling card is being the largely undefeatable star of the show's pop-culture trivia game "Smarter Than Reagan. " While many DJs enjoy the faceless public anonymity of radio, Warfield is known for participating in a number of regional charity events while also finding time to teach at his alma mater, Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 3, 2013
"Could people like Bob Dole, even Ronald Reagan -- could you make it in today's Republican Party?" Chris Wallace of "Fox News Sunday" asked former Senate Majority Leader and 1996 GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole. "I doubt it," Mr. Dole replied. "Reagan wouldn't have made it. Certainly, Nixon couldn't have made it, because he had ideas and -- We might have made it, but I doubt it. " Let me state up front that I have incredible respect and admiration for Mr. Dole. He's an American hero and was a politician of undisputed integrity.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | April 18, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- I have no idea whether Fred Thompson, former senator from Tennessee, will run for the Republican nomination for president, but he should. He has Ronald Reagan's communication skills and speaks plainly, in ways most people can understand. Anyone who has listened to him substitute for Paul Harvey on ABC News Radio senses that, in this, he follows in Mr. Reagan's footsteps. Mr. Thompson conveys Middle American, common-sense values. When he is asked a question, he doesn't sound as if he's giving a poll-tested, pabulum answer.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 30, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- William French Smith, former President Reagan's personal lawyer and key adviser who placed his conservative stamp on federal policy during his term as U.S. attorney general, is dead of cancer at the age of 73.Smith died yesterday with his family at his bedside at the Kenneth Norris Jr. Cancer Center at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center where he was admitted Oct. 2, a hospital spokeswoman said.Smith was an original member of the "kitchen Cabinet" who helped guide Reagan from Hollywood to Sacramento, Calif.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
After news that his partner on the popular Mix 106.5 morning show had been let go, Reagan Warfield posted an emotional tribute to Jojo Girard on Facebook. "The last 24 hours have been and emotional blur," wrote Warfield, who remains at the station. "This is tough. " Girard confirmed to The Sun Thursday that he was told immediately after his show that day that his contract would not be renewed. Girard posted on Facebook: "have joined the ranks of the unemployed at least I'm not alone.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 13, 2012
It would seem that we're now at the stage of global economic lunacy where the worldwide socialist slide is so far gone that the president of Russia is lecturing the world, and particularly Europe, about the risks of socialism. Speaking at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference in Vladivostok, Russia, Vladimir Putin promoted the merits of free-market economics. He said that by pulling the former Soviet satellite states into its sphere after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Europe chose to take responsibility for subsidizing their economic well-being.
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