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By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 28, 1998
"Ready for School": Kindergarten, about $20, Fisher-Price, 800-545-7677.This is the newest title in the Fisher-Price line of "Ready for School" software. The program is designed to prepare children ages 4 to 6 for their first school experience by providing them with 20 different activities in the areas of early learning and social awareness. Whimsical animation and catchy tunes are interspersed with skills, such as telling time, recognizing letters, identifying shapes and colors and safety and manners.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | January 3, 2014
With Old School RAW coming to Baltimore on Monday, I got a chance to talk to a WWE Superstar that is constantly referred to as “old school," Antonio Cesaro. We had a chance to talk about his past year, his affiliation with the Real Americans, his rise through the independent circuit, his time recently at WWE's developmental organization, NXT, as well as his thoughts on Old School RAW. Q: How would you characterize your 2013 in the WWE? A: Well, I started the year as the United States champion, and now I am not the United States champion.
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NEWS
August 27, 1992
If the United States is to compete successfully in the 21st century, it will have to do a better job of cultivating its most important asset -- the children who as adults will make up the work force. As things stand now, children get little more than lip service as a national priority. A new report from the National Governors' Association hopes to change that.The report focuses on getting young children ready for school, so that they do not enter first grade distracted by poor health, family troubles or other problems that now cause many young pupils to face a hopeless catch-up game from the day they first enter the schoolhouse door.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
After months of observing, listening and preparing, Liberty High School rising senior Rachel Van Parys has left the audience and joined the actors, ready to take on her new role. Van Parys is the new student member of the Carroll County Board of Education, a position she will hold for a year. For the first time this month, she slipped into the seat recently vacated by Maggie McEvoy, a Century High student who just graduated. "It's really exciting, and it will definitely be hard to follow Maggie and Brendan [Schlauch]
NEWS
August 29, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about the importance of a positive attitude when youngsters head back to school. Her column appears biweekly.Wasn't summer great? Didn't we all have fun? Those long, lazy days outside, sitting around the pool, barbecuing, just having fun, are almost over. Never fear! With summer's end in sight, new fun is happening just around the corner. We're gearing up for a new school year. Happy New Year to all!Here are some things to consider when getting your child ready for school:* Create positive attitudes about the new school year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Seventeen Maryland school districts -- including all of those in the Baltimore metropolitan area -- have received grants totaling $2.42 million for new school-improvement projects under the federal Schools for Success/Goals 2000 program, now entering its third year.The award, announced at this week's Maryland State Board of Education meeting, is part of this year's $5 million federal grant.The rest of the money will be used for existing programs and administration.Overall, Maryland schools have received $11.6 million in the three years of the Goals 2000 awards, about $10 million of which has gone to programs of local school systems.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
The calendar says October, but at Piney Orchard Elementary School, the 23rd will read "First Day of School" - for the building, anyway. "We're just delighted," said Janet Fiorina, inaugural president of the new school's PTA. A series of construction delays have troubled the $12 million project in Odenton. The contract called for the school to be completed by July 15. It was supposed to be ready for the opening of county schools in late August. "Normally, we try to have schools that open on time," said Jane W. Beckett, spokeswoman for county public schools.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Until she attended a Head Start preschool program, 3-year-old Jazmine Moore used to pull her mother toward the kitchen to signal she wanted something to drink. "If I gave her milk instead of juice, she would fall out," or have a temper tantrum, recalled Tenesha Moore, a Govans resident. But after the little girl began spending her days in a program that helps children develop verbal and social skills, her mother said, Jazmine learned to speak in complete sentences -- and is likely to be ready for school by the time she turns 5. Stories like Jazmine's are the exception, however, mainly because of insufficient outreach to Baltimore families and lack of coordination among agencies that provide early-childhood services, according to a coalition of 50 community leaders and groups that has studied school readiness.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1995
The principal is coming to Kelsey Kolb's house in the middle of the afternoon.But Kelsey can't be in trouble. She's only a year old and just beginning to walk and talk.And the principal is smiling and bringing a balloon.What's wrong with this picture?Not a thing, says Linda Proudfoot, the principal of Battle Grove Elementary in eastern Baltimore County.Kelsey is at just the right age to be read to, and the school wants to be sure her parents know this. So Kelsey is receiving a "Happy Birthday, Baby" visit from her friends at the neighborhood school.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2003
Despite the pleas of about a dozen parents who believe their children will be ready for kindergarten before age 5, the Carroll County school board decided last night against developing a waiver program that would have allowed 4-year-olds to begin kindergarten even though they aren't old enough under new state rules. The board did vote, however, to permit waivers for the coming school year, noting that many parents in the community have said they have not had enough time to adjust to requirements approved by the state school board in May that moved up the date by which children must turn 5 before they can enter kindergarten.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2006
Michael Hale of Laurel had a fun and relaxing summer. He went to the beach with his family and participated in a nature camp and sports camp. Now he is ready to put those carefree days behind him and begin his career as a pupil. Next week, he will start kindergarten at Laurel Wood Elementary School. "I want school to start right now," Michael said. And why is he so eager to say goodbye to summer? "School is a good way to learn," he said. He is also excited about riding the bus. Michael and about 15 other children were at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library on Wednesday taking part in a half-hour get-ready-for-kindergarten program called "Kindergarten, Here We Come" run by Rita Snyder, a library associate in the children's department.
NEWS
By KATHERINE DUNN AND LEM SATTERFIELD and KATHERINE DUNN AND LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTERS | February 15, 2006
Look at the statistics for Catonsville's girls basketball team and one thing will jump out - how balanced the Comets have been. Nobody is putting up huge numbers, but everybody is contributing to the Comets' run to the Baltimore County championship game. Janay Johnson averages 11.1 points while Jennifer Willis adds 10, Jessica Nonn has eight and Shamika Williams, seven. Friday night, Johnson, Willis and Nonn scored in the low double figures as the Comets finished a 9-0 run through the county's 4A-3A Division with a 52-42 win over Perry Hall, which also came into the game unbeaten in the division.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Until she attended a Head Start preschool program, 3-year-old Jazmine Moore used to pull her mother toward the kitchen to signal she wanted something to drink. "If I gave her milk instead of juice, she would fall out," or have a temper tantrum, recalled Tenesha Moore, a Govans resident. But after the little girl began spending her days in a program that helps children develop verbal and social skills, her mother said, Jazmine learned to speak in complete sentences -- and is likely to be ready for school by the time she turns 5. Stories like Jazmine's are the exception, however, mainly because of insufficient outreach to Baltimore families and lack of coordination among agencies that provide early-childhood services, according to a coalition of 50 community leaders and groups that has studied school readiness.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2003
IN THE BOMB drills of the 1950s, we dove under our desks, covered our heads with our arms - and prayed it wasn't an A-bomb en route from Moscow. Here's the 2003 "Code Red" terrorist drill in Montgomery County: Children close the classroom blinds, huddle in a corner, stay quiet - and pray it's not some madman who has unleashed a chemical attack. If the kids are noisy during the drill, a note from a roving administrator is slipped under the door. "You're dead," it reads, meaning that those who don't take the threat seriously are risking their lives and the lives of others.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
With Carroll County planning a rare public school day on Good Friday to make up for snow days, administrators are bracing for least 15 percent absenteeism tomorrow among teachers - and perhaps even more absences by students. More than 300 of the school district's 1,950 teachers had given notice by Tuesday afternoon - the most recent statistics available - that they plan to take the revoked spring vacation day as a personal day. "The surprise is not the number of teachers taking off," said Stephen Guthrie, the school system's assistant superintendent of administration.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2003
Despite the pleas of about a dozen parents who believe their children will be ready for kindergarten before age 5, the Carroll County school board decided last night against developing a waiver program that would have allowed 4-year-olds to begin kindergarten even though they aren't old enough under new state rules. The board did vote, however, to permit waivers for the coming school year, noting that many parents in the community have said they have not had enough time to adjust to requirements approved by the state school board in May that moved up the date by which children must turn 5 before they can enter kindergarten.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
Only about half of Maryland children are fully prepared for kindergarten when they enter school, the state reported yesterday, spurring calls from state officials for more early-childhood education. Educators and politicians said this first report on the readiness of kindergartners demonstrates the need for full-day kindergarten and preschool programs, especially for poor and minority children. "Child care used to be just glorified baby-sitting - just snacks and naps," said Del. Mark K. Shriver, a Democrat from Montgomery County.
NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | August 3, 1994
"Do you have company?" she asked. "If you have guests I can come back later."Shaking my head, I ushered her in."I saw the strange car outside in the driveway. . . ." She stopped as it began to add up. "No guests. Strange, clean car. No oil slick. EPA warnings have been removed from the garage."Rushing to the window she gasped, "Where's the Buick?"Gone, I replied calmly. Twelve years, two transmissions and an odometer that's read 76,123 miles since 1989 -- all gone.And with it's demise, an era in my driving career ended:* No more special attention at traffic signals, where passing motorists who saw the steam spewing from assorted radiator leaks would frantically call out, "You're car is on fire!"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 29, 2002
AMMAN, Jordan - A senior American diplomat in Jordan, Laurence Foley, was gunned down outside his house yesterday, shot eight times at close range in what appeared to be the latest in a string of terror attacks against Western targets in the region and beyond. The assassination reverberated through this often-sleepy capital, not least among the expatriate community. Foreign residents said they had been rudely awakened to the realization that the potential for escalating violence on both sides of Jordan - in the West Bank as well as in Iraq - could roil a city long considered safe.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
Only about half of Maryland children are fully prepared for kindergarten when they enter school, the state reported yesterday, spurring calls from state officials for more early-childhood education. Educators and politicians said this first report on the readiness of kindergartners demonstrates the need for full-day kindergarten and preschool programs, especially for poor and minority children. "Child care used to be just glorified baby-sitting - just snacks and naps," said Del. Mark K. Shriver, a Democrat from Montgomery County.
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