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December 20, 1998
Reading to children is considered important by 95 percent of the adults surveyed in a recent study by Publishers Weekly. The survey also found that bedtime is the most popular time for sharing story books (60 percent) followed by early evening and before or after dinner (38 percent). Women buy more children's books than men, 20 books per year as compared to 14 by men. And more than half of the 900 respondents polled said their children read more than they did as kids.Pub Date: 12/20/98
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NEWS
By MARY SCOTT and MARY SCOTT,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
Daycare provider Lovia Matthews and nearly a dozen children dance and sing along with a song about peanut butter and jelly. Later, the children shout out words together during a reading of The Gingerbread Man. Their eyes follow the tale on a storyboard. "The interaction is really great, and all of the kids seem really attentive," Matthews says, as she sits on the rug with a wild animal theme, which matches the paintings, books and toys that surround her in the new Early Literacy Learning Center at the Woodlawn library.
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NEWS
September 19, 1999
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects.Among them are:Garrett Heights Elementary School, 2800 Ailsa Ave., Baltimore, for tutoring or reading to children in kindergarten through third grade. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on school days. Contact: Jill Hull, 410-396-6361.Our House Youth Home, 4110 College Ave., Ellicott City, for tutoring boys ages 16 to 19 in reading, math and writing. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2005
Children age 6 and under will be eligible to receive their own library cards and will be exempt from overdue charges at Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library under a campaign being announced today to encourage reading at the earliest ages. The young cardholders will get a pass on the 10-cents-a-day overdue fine and other red tape. They also could continue to borrow books if their parents have racked up fines. The program is called First Card, and experts and librarians hope it will encourage parents to make the library - and reading at home - a lifetime habit.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 30, 1997
Proclaiming November as "Maryland Family Reading Month," Gov. Parris N. Glendening urged parents yesterday to turn off their televisions and read with their children.During a ceremony at the Baltimore County public library branch in Towson, Glendening read to a group of students and stressed the importance of reading to children, even at a young age."The love of reading is one of the greatest gifts you can give a child," Glendening said.To promote the effort, bookmarks will be available at schools and libraries.
NEWS
By MARY SCOTT and MARY SCOTT,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
Daycare provider Lovia Matthews and nearly a dozen children dance and sing along with a song about peanut butter and jelly. Later, the children shout out words together during a reading of The Gingerbread Man. Their eyes follow the tale on a storyboard. "The interaction is really great, and all of the kids seem really attentive," Matthews says, as she sits on the rug with a wild animal theme, which matches the paintings, books and toys that surround her in the new Early Literacy Learning Center at the Woodlawn library.
NEWS
June 14, 1998
In a message marking the end of the school year, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has issued a report card of sorts on the state's Reading Across Maryland program that challenged children to read at least 10 books.The program promised a "Rising Star" reading certificate for each child achieving the 10-book goal."As the school year comes to a close," Glendening said, "we are happy to report that the children tackled my challenge with gusto and earned over 300,000 certificates. This means children in Maryland read at least 3 million books since November."
NEWS
May 2, 1993
Name: Jane Andrew of Severna ParkVolunteer work: Jane Andrew was one of three county residents recently honored at the J. C. Penney Golden Rule Volunteer Awards ceremony held at Martin's West in Baltimore.Mrs. Andrew was recognized for her work in founding Baby's First Step, a program that promotes adults reading to infants and toddlers.A county resident all her life and a member of the Board of Education from 1983 to 1989, Mrs. Andrew believes in the importance of getting preschoolers interested in reading.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 2001
DALLAS - Fredaysha Lucky was waving a red baton as she led the 15 children at her feet through the letters of the alphabet, each stapled to the wall behind her. She would shout out a letter, followed by a word and then the letter's sound - " `E', elephant, eh!" " `I', igloo, ih!" - and the children, cross-legged on a green rug, would follow in loud unison. She and her class tripped over only two letters, which isn't bad, considering that Fredaysha is 4 years old and half the others in Room 4 at the Margaret H. Cone Head Start center here are 3. Nearly all of them are black or Hispanic and live in an adjoining housing project, which is among the poorest in Dallas and is mostly barren, but for the occasional pecan tree.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
IF THERE ARE MUSES who watch over children, they must sleep over at JoAnn Fruchtman's Children's Book Store.When she set up shop 20 years ago in South Baltimore, Fruchtman had read every book on the shelves. After a move uptown to Harborplace and then way uptown to Roland Park, Fruchtman's store at 737 Deepdene Road is much bigger but no less crowded.The proprietor says she and her employees have read every author represented in a store stocked floor to ceiling with marvelous children's literature.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 2001
DALLAS - Fredaysha Lucky was waving a red baton as she led the 15 children at her feet through the letters of the alphabet, each stapled to the wall behind her. She would shout out a letter, followed by a word and then the letter's sound - " `E', elephant, eh!" " `I', igloo, ih!" - and the children, cross-legged on a green rug, would follow in loud unison. She and her class tripped over only two letters, which isn't bad, considering that Fredaysha is 4 years old and half the others in Room 4 at the Margaret H. Cone Head Start center here are 3. Nearly all of them are black or Hispanic and live in an adjoining housing project, which is among the poorest in Dallas and is mostly barren, but for the occasional pecan tree.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2000
While many youngsters were lounging poolside, taking advantage of their summer days off, school systems across the region were beginning to make use of federal money designated to help those same children - and others - learn to read. Eight school districts were given millions of dollars last year as part of the Reading Excellence Act, a grant to improve reading instruction allocated to counties with large numbers of children living in poverty. Of those eight - Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford, Howard, Prince George's, Somerset and St. Mary's counties - some started work last year; several put the grant money into full swing this summer; and some will start initiatives when school begins.
NEWS
By Mia McNeil and Mia McNeil,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
A $59,000 grant in Baltimore County is expected to make it easier for parents and caregivers to give their preschoolers a head start on reading and will also provide them with activities through the county public library system. The federal grant will be used by Baltimore County Public Library for a volunteer-based program called "Baby Boosters" that will reach out to preschoolers, their parents and caregivers in the community. The project is part of a statewide move by public and private organizations to ensure that all children are ready to learn reading by age 5. "Once kids are school age, there are a lot of things for them to do when it comes to reading," said Kathy Coster, marketing and programming manager for the county library.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen concludes her series on language development. Her column appears bi-weekly. Learning to read and write is not a single act but many steps on a developmental continuum. Most children develop the basic concepts of print by the time they are 6 years old. They begin to experiment with language. Some test their independence by reading by themselves. Others read simple stories and write about meaningful topics. Some will use an invented form of spelling, and almost all show their curiosity by asking many questions as they yearn to know more about the world around them.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
A FEW MONTHS ago, I interviewed 8-year-old Caitlin Smith, a Catonsville Elementary School second-grader who had - amazingly - read 1,000 books. A few days after my column appeared, Caitlin's mother, Carol Walter, volunteered one secret of her daughter's voracious literary accomplishment. "I have to admit," Walter said, "that I read to her in the bathtub even before she was born." There's no way to prove, of course, that prepartum reading is linked to postpartum literary interest, but Walter added quickly that she continued to read to - and eventually with - Caitlin virtually every day of her young life.
NEWS
September 19, 1999
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects.Among them are:Garrett Heights Elementary School, 2800 Ailsa Ave., Baltimore, for tutoring or reading to children in kindergarten through third grade. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on school days. Contact: Jill Hull, 410-396-6361.Our House Youth Home, 4110 College Ave., Ellicott City, for tutoring boys ages 16 to 19 in reading, math and writing. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
Baltimore pediatricians will soon be adding a new staple to their medicine kits -- books.In a citywide initiative that first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton announced in Baltimore yesterday, doctors and nurses will include daily doses of "Goodnight Moon" and "Curious George" in their prescriptions for infants and toddlers."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
THERE'S A LOT to like about home schooling.By definition, home schools are everything the big public schools aren't. They're small, they aren't tied up in regulatory knots, parental participation is guaranteed. (So is homework.) By necessity, they're resourceful.I saw an example the other night at the Arundel Homeschoolers Support Group workshop and used curriculum fair, held at a church on the outskirts of Annapolis.While some parents attended seminars with titles like "Developing Biblical Gender Roles in a Politically Incorrect World," "The Joy of Teaching Science at Home" and "Help for the Struggling Reader," others crowded around tables to barter in previously owned curricula.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
Parents visiting the Baltimore County Health Department are finding extra encouragement these days to read to their children.In "Prescription to Read," a partnership between the county public library system and the Health Department, pamphlets are being distributed at the eight county health centers that include lists of recommended books for children and adults.The book lists, which also are available in health centers at eight county schools, include titles intended to help adults improve their parental skills and others that are suitable to be read by children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
Vigen Guroian, a theologian and ethicist who teaches at Loyola College in Maryland, has read the important tomes by the authorities in his field. He has even written a couple of them.But to his mind, one of the best sources of moral wisdom lies in the classic fairy tales read to us when we were children.Not the sanitized Disney versions, mind you. But classics like the stories by the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid," and the story of the wooden puppet who wanted to become a real boy, "Pinocchio."
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