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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Maryland education officials said yesterday they are confident real gains are being made in state pupils' reading skills, and that their scores on the latest national reading assessment test were not inflated by excluding more special education students from taking it."Our reading gains are modest, but we believe that they are real," said Ronald A. Peiffer, assistant superintendent for the Maryland Department of Education, noting the state's reading tests show similar gains.The average score for Maryland fourth-graders taking the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
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NEWS
February 22, 1998
Percent of students statewide who achieved a satisfactory score in the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program MSPAP) reading test.1994 -- 30.6%1995 -- 34.0%1996 -- 35.3%1997 -- 36.8%Pub Date: 2/22/98
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | July 15, 2008
The Baltimore school system posted historic gains on the Maryland School Assessments this year, with reading scores up an average of 11 percentage points and math up an average of 8 points. With the biggest improvement in fifth, sixth and seventh grades, the city bucked a national trend in which progress among young children stagnates or reverses by the time they enter middle school. Sixty-one percent of Baltimore's seventh-graders passed the reading test, compared with 43 percent last year, a jump of 18 percentage points.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Fewer than one-fourth of Anne Arundel County's public schools met at least one standard for the 1994 Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) exams -- and that was an improvement over last year."We have more schools meeting the standards, and we have increased the number of schools that are close to meeting the standards," Superintendent Carol S. Parham said yesterday after the school-by-school report cards were released.Twenty of 92 schools met at least one standard, up from 11 schools in 1993.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
Fewer Carroll County elementary and middle school pupils are reading below grade level this year than last year, according to countywide reading test scores that will be presented to the school board tonight. School officials credit early-intervention reading programs that have focused more individualized attention on schools' poorest readers, although administrators acknowledge that too many pupils still struggle to read. "We certainly have a long way to go," said Gregory Bricca, the school system's supervisor of accountability and assessment.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
MARYLAND STUDENTS generally did better this year than last on standardized state reading and math tests, a sign of good preparation for stiffer high school graduation requirements and annual assessments mandated under the federal No Child Left Behind law. But though students in all 24 school districts were more proficient in reading and math, and black and Latino students showed impressive improvements, there are still achievement gaps to be addressed, particularly...
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
Maryland gains in last year's national reading test were inflated because of an increase in the number of special education pupils excluded from the testing pool, the U.S. Education Department said yesterday.But federal and state officials said overall results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) were valid and that no scores or rankings will be officially changed.Nine percent of Maryland fourth-graders were excluded from the NAEP test in 1998, up from 7 percent in 1994.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Baltimore secondary students who struggled last year to pass state tests measuring basic competency in reading and math may have more trouble passing more challenging exams being used for the first time in high schools across Maryland. This year's ninth-graders will be the first to be officially scored on the state's new High School Assessments, which measure students' knowledge in subjects such as algebra, English, biology and government. Those exams are far more rigorous than the Maryland Functional tests - designed to ensure that children know how to read a glossary, change a fraction to a percent and identify the main idea of a text passage, among other things.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Maryland students made gains in reading and math on the most recent national tests, in some cases outpacing strides made in other states. In three of the four tests given in the spring, Maryland ranked slightly above the national average. Still, that means that - as in many other states - fewer than half of Maryland students are passing the national tests. The National Assessment of Educational Progress tests in reading and math were given to 700,000 students in the fourth and eighth grades in Maryland and across the nation in March.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Harford County students improved on statewide standardized tests last year, following a trend of better performance around Maryland. However, four of the county's schools are struggling to address the needs of some children who did not reach annual targets on these exams. The results of the math and reading Maryland School Assessments, offered in the spring, determine whether children have made "adequate progress" toward state goals as required under the federal No Child Left Behind act. Different groups State officials also examine the scores of children in different racial groups or those receiving services such as special education or subsidized lunches - an indicator of poverty - to determine whether all children are improving.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
MARYLAND STUDENTS generally did better this year than last on standardized state reading and math tests, a sign of good preparation for stiffer high school graduation requirements and annual assessments mandated under the federal No Child Left Behind law. But though students in all 24 school districts were more proficient in reading and math, and black and Latino students showed impressive improvements, there are still achievement gaps to be addressed, particularly...
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Baltimore public schools made gains in the latest round of the Maryland School Assessment, but improvements in the state's most-challenged school system were less substantial than this time last year. Although they acknowledged that they see plenty of room for improvement, city school officials said they were encouraged by the data released by the state yesterday. "Have we reached where we want to go with our children? No, we have not. But we are certainly headed in the right direction," said school board Chairwoman Patricia Welch.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Harford County pupils scored above the state average on all 12 of Maryland's math and reading tests, in many instances outperforming pupils in higher-profile counties such as Montgomery. The percentage of pupils who passed the exams also improved from last year in all grades and racial and ethnic groups, school officials said. But there remained room for improvement: At Aberdeen, Edgewood and Magnolia middle schools, more than two-thirds of eighth-graders failed the math test. More than 40 percent of those schools' eighth-graders failed the reading test.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Tanika White and Sara Neufeld and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Little more than a dozen years ago, Eastern Vocational-Technical High School in Essex was preparing its students to head straight to work, fixing cars, maybe, or styling hair. Today, with Vocational long since dropped, Eastern Tech has something else attached to its name: the highest 10th-grade reading score in the state. Blue-collar Essex, drained by a steady loss of manufacturing jobs, has demonstrated how possibility can grow out of pain. "We're used to seeing this in the richest school," said Rita Norman, whose daughter Jasmine is finishing her freshman year at Eastern Tech, in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
JOHNSON CITY, Texas -- The county is Blanco, and it's about the only thing hereabout that's not named for Lyndon Baines Johnson or his family.The local public school, naturally, is LBJ Elementary. It's where the 36th president went to grade school, though he learned to read at age 4 in a one-room school 14 miles and a million flowering bluebonnets west of here.It was in that school, now restored, that Johnson signed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The "original education president," the National Park Service guide tells a group of us on tour, signed 50 major pieces of school legislation and believed "the only valid passport from poverty is an education."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
The state's newest test intended to measure individual student and schoolwide achievement got off to a relatively smooth start yesterday, despite a last-minute scramble for test materials in some districts. Although nearly half of the school systems postponed the start of the four-day Maryland School Assessment testing until today - and a few Baltimore schools put off testing when they didn't get the materials in time- other school systems rebounded from the past few weeks' snow closures and gave the test on schedule.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
Anne Arundel County students performed better than the state average in reading and math on this year's Maryland School Assessment and made bigger gains over last year than their peers statewide, according to data released yesterday. The test scores also indicated that the county is having some success in narrowing an achievement gap between white or privileged pupils and those of minority or disadvantaged backgrounds, although special-education pupils fell further behind their peers. Superintendent Eric J. Smith said he was impressed by the results, which come at the end of a year of significant changes for the school system.
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