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By JEAN LESLIE | September 20, 1993
For years, Ellicott City resident Cathy Bond had been a reading teacher at RICA-Baltimore, a regional facility for troubled youngsters. So when she received an invitation from People to People International asking her to participate in the Reading Educators Delegation to China, she enthusiastically agreed, knowing that this chance might not soon return.Ms. Bond plans to leave the country on Oct. 18, and return on Nov. 2. During her two-week stay, Ms. Bond will combine professional growth with a tour of China's sites, spending time in the cities of Beijing, Hangzhou, Suzhou and Shanghai.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Bernard I.H. "Bernie" Kramer, a retired Baltimore public school vice principal who earlier had been an English department head and reading teacher, died Aug. 14 at Autumn Ridge Nursing Center in Pikesville of complications from a stroke. He was 92. The son of Harry Krasner, a plasterer, and Vivian Levita Krasner, Bernard Herman Krasner was born in Pruzhany, Poland, which is now part of Belarus. He was 4 when he and his family left Poland and arrived at Ellis Island in New York Harbor.
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NEWS
January 31, 1994
Board recognizes staff achievementsThe Carroll County School Board is recognizing these staff members for their achievements:* Linda Danmyer, secretary in Curriculum Division: for receiving a certificate of appreciation from Gov. William Donald Schaefer for her work on Total Quality Management conferences last fall.* William Hill, machine technology instructor at the Career and Technology Center: for receiving the award of excellence from the Greater Baltimore Committee and Regional Technology Council for efforts in developing student awareness of manufacturing careers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Alcuin H. "Al" Krebs, a retired Baltimore public schools reading resource teacher and World War II combat Marine, died Monday of Alzheimer's disease at Brightwood assisted living in Catonsville. He was 86. The son of a lithographer and a homemaker, Alcuin Henry Krebs, one of 10 children, was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore. He later attended Catonsville High School. "He begged his father to let him enlist in the Marine Corps when he was 17 years old," said a daughter, Nancy Krebs of Severn.
FEATURES
January 13, 1998
The Sun has assembled a panel of experts to address parents' concerns about reading -- from a psychologist and a pediatrician to an ophthalmologist and a reading teacher. We'll also ask other parents what's worked for them.Your questions and the responses of our experts will appear in our special "Reading by 9" pages on Sundays and Wednesdays, beginning soon in the Today section of The Sun.Address your concerns to: Ask the Experts, Reading by 9, Features Dept., The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278Pub Date: 1/13/98
FEATURES
January 16, 1998
One of the most worrisome things for parents are signs their child is having difficulty learning to read, because they know reading is the key to an education.The Sun has assembled a panel of experts to address your concerns about reading and your child -- from a psychologist and a pediatrician to an ophthalmologist and a reading teacher. We also will ask other parents what has worked for them.Your questions and the responses of our experts will appear in our special "Reading by 9" pages on Sundays and Wednesdays, beginning soon in the Today section of The Sun. If you have a question, send it in and we'll get the answer.
FEATURES
December 22, 1997
One of the most worrisome things for parents are signs their child is having difficulty learning to read, because they know reading is the key to the child's education.The Sun has assembled a panel of experts to address your concerns about reading and your child -- from a psychologist and a pediatrician to an ophthalmologist and a reading teacher. We also will ask other parents what has worked for them.Your questions and the responses of our experts will appear in our special "Reading by 9" pages on Sundays and Wednesdays, beginning soon in the Today section of The Sun.L If you have a question, send it in and we'll get the answer.
NEWS
August 2, 1998
Area schools, libraries and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children or adults improve reading skills. Among them are: Thomas Johnson Elementary School, 100 E. Heath St., in South Baltimore, to work with children on reading difficulties during the school day beginning in September. Training will be provided, and hours for tutoring arranged between 7: 45 a.m. and 3 p.m. Information: Maria Zozuliak, reading teacher, 410-396-1575.Baltimore Reading Aides, 6200 Loch Raven Blvd., for one-on-one tutoring of adults learning to read or trying to improve reading skills.
NEWS
January 16, 2006
Donald Byrd Marston Sr., an English and reading teacher who was once a top-ranked table tennis player, died of pneumonia Jan. 9 at Sinai Hospital after an extended illness. He was 79 and had lived in Sykesville. He taught for more than 30 years at the old Brooklyn Park Junior/Senior High School in Baltimore. He was stern in the classroom, said his daughter, Barbara Fost of Catonsville, but was also funny and passionate about his work. Mr. Marston, who was born in California, earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland.
FEATURES
April 12, 1998
In May, public school students in third, fifth and eighth grades will take the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program tests - or, the MSPAPs, as they are commonly known. In today's Ask the Experts, Susan Johnsen Webster, principal of Triadelphia Ridge Elementary and an educator in Howard County for 21 years, answers the most frequently asked question about the state test.Question: How can I use MSPAP information to help me !c understand how my child is reading?Answer: MSPAP scores should only be used as one small piece && of information about your child's reading achievement.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Eleanor Saulsbury's entry into teaching did not bode well for a long, successful career. When she graduated from what is now Coppin State University in 1968, she had asked to be placed at Norwood Elementary in Baltimore County because it was close to her family's home in Edgemere. She was naive, she said, not to think that the fact that she was an African-American might be an issue in an all-white school during a year when riots had left blocks in Baltimore burned and looted. Right away, a parent demanded that her child be taken out of Saulsbury's classroom.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Sarah Jeannette Raphel Tressler, a retired Baltimore County reading teacher, died of cancer Nov. 16 at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland. She was 87 and lived in Parkville and Ocean City. Born Sarah Jeannette Raphel in Cumberland, she earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from Towson University and a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. She began teaching in 1963 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Baynesville. She later joined the Baltimore County school system and taught at Back River and McCormick elementary schools and at Pine Grove Middle School.
NEWS
January 16, 2006
Donald Byrd Marston Sr., an English and reading teacher who was once a top-ranked table tennis player, died of pneumonia Jan. 9 at Sinai Hospital after an extended illness. He was 79 and had lived in Sykesville. He taught for more than 30 years at the old Brooklyn Park Junior/Senior High School in Baltimore. He was stern in the classroom, said his daughter, Barbara Fost of Catonsville, but was also funny and passionate about his work. Mr. Marston, who was born in California, earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
THE ANNUAL meeting of Maryland's reading teachers is a good place to judge the mood of the moment. Each March, several hundred teachers from all over the state gather at Hunt Valley. Many are specialists who spend their working days on reading, but others are traditional elementary instructors who cover the waterfront, from reading to science, social studies and math. This year they are mighty peeved. Two years ago - the last convention I attended - the teachers had just said sayonara to the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2001
THE NATION'S reading teachers feel put upon. President Bush wants - and both houses of Congress have approved - annual testing in reading of every child in grades three through eight. Some states are testing veteran classroom teachers. Maryland demands that elementary teachers take four college courses in reading. Other states are following suit. Worse, the teachers are being ordered to teach phonics. Resentment over all of this is easy to discern at the Baltimore Convention Center and downtown hotels, as 6,000 members of the National Council of Teachers of English gather for their 91st convention.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
It was a failed lesson on Leap Year Day that made a reading teacher of Alison Howell. She was Alison Harkins then, a 23-year-old senior at Towson University planning a wedding and a career in teaching. That Feb. 29, 2000, Howell taught her first lesson solo at Jessup Elementary School. Twenty second-graders and two unsmiling adults looked on. Howell had been up all night fretting over her lesson plan, and she was nervous. It had been a long journey to this ground-floor classroom in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2001
MORE THAN 150 sixth-graders from Northwest Middle School spent a hot day last week pulling weeds and picking up trash at two Taneytown parks as part of an environmental project for school. "This evolved in a funny way," said Emily Kissner, a language arts and reading teacher who proposed the idea. Kissner said she and fellow reading teacher Gayle Sands looked at how they could involve the community in their reading projects. Sands conducted a service project in which her pupils collected clothes for Baltimore foster children.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2001
MORE THAN 150 sixth-graders from Northwest Middle School spent a hot day last week pulling weeds and picking up trash at two Taneytown parks as part of an environmental project for school. "This evolved in a funny way," said Emily Kissner, a language arts and reading teacher who proposed the idea. Kissner said she and fellow reading teacher Gayle Sands looked at how they could involve the community in their reading projects. Sands conducted a service project in which her pupils collected clothes for Baltimore foster children.
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