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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2001
Starting in September, the Baltimore school system will dispatch a new corps of reading "coaches" into 32 elementary schools to help teachers, much the way the coach of a sports team helps his players. School officials are using $1 million of this year's extra funding from the state to give teachers in-classroom support and training in reading instruction from those who know it best: reading specialists. "We're going to put them in there and they're going to be our experts," said Patricia E. Abernethy, director of curriculum and instruction for the 98,000-student district.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Patricia E. Sadowski, a retired Baltimore County public schools reading specialist and music lover, died Sunday from congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Oak Crest Village resident was 76. "Pat worked with children who were learning to read and those who had been diagnosed with learning difficulties," said Flora Smith of Mount Washington, who worked with Mrs. Sadowski at Oakleigh and Hillendale elementary schools. "She was the ultimate professional. " The daughter of a business executive and a homemaker, the former Patricia Ellen Morrison was born in Baltimore and raised in Ridgewood, N.J., and Roland Park.
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NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Declaring that every child has the right to "excellent reading instruction," the International Reading Association -- a nonpartisan group -- is calling on school districts across the country to concentrate more resources on reading specialists, classroom teachers and supplies rather than on standardized tests. "Classrooms have changed very little in the last 45 years," said Carol Santa, president of the International Reading Association, at a National Press Club news conference Monday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Clara Mae Boender, a retired reading specialist and elementary school teacher who taught for 54 years, died of multisystem organ failure Jan. 12 at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 86. Born Clara Mae Crouch in Baltimore and raised in the Paradise section of Catonsville, she was the daughter of Harry Crouch, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad worker, and Ruth Crouch, who founded the Kinder Kraft Kindergarten, a school located in Catonsville and later Ten Hills.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1999
Students at Baltimore County's six alternative middle and high schools have serious reading problems but only one specialist to help them improve -- an alarming situation that has forced the Board of Education to consider hiring reading specialists at each school next year."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1998
Harford County school officials have never been eager to follow educational fads -- and, at least when it comes to reading, parents and teachers are grateful."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
Elementary schools in Anne Arundel County are understaffed by nearly 175 positions, not counting classroom teachers, according to a new report by elementary principals.The jobs are support staff: secretaries, assistant administrators, guidance counselors, reading specialists and technical workers."There are some rather gross inequities," said Oak Hill Principal Lawrence Campbell. "We don't feel that we are able to provide all the services that our students need."The report says the school system needs nine more administrators, 118 secretaries and technical staff, 16.5 reading teachers and 30.5 guidance counselors.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
On the second floor of Canton Middle School, in a classroom adorned with posters proclaiming the most elementary rules of reading, Liz Harris fights a daily battle to make readers of preteen illiterates.Her sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders look more like young adults than children, but their reading skills are no better than the average third- or fourth-grader's. Principal Craig Spilman has test data that suggest 80 percent of this year's sixth-graders read below third-grade level in September.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
It's often hard to keep politics out of decision-making on education. But when it came to selecting reading curriculums as part of a No Child Left Behind literacy program, some Department of Education officials didn't even try. A report released last week by the Department's inspector general shows that the reading improvement program has been shamefully mired in favoritism and conflicts of interest. Department officials need to clean up the mess as quickly as possible. The Reading First program aims to help first-, second- and third-graders read better as a way to boost broader academic success.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 27, 1999
In Baltimore CountyReading specialists to discuss training for assistants, volunteersCOCKEYSVILLE -- County elementary school reading specialists will meet today to learn how to train teacher aides and community volunteers to help young readers improve their word-recognition skills.About 120 elementary school reading specialists will meet at 8: 30 a.m. at Cockeysville Middle School for workshops that school system officials hope will result in better training for volunteers who lack educational training but want to help at neighborhood schools.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Carolyn Rosenstein, a retired McDonogh School reading specialist recalled as a nurturing faculty mentor who also served on the Women's Board of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, died of cancer Oct. 27 at her Pikesville home. She was 75. "She was a great gal, very irreverent. She called it just as she saw it," said Barbara Dover, a fellow member of the Hopkins' Women's Board. "She did it with a smile and a chuckle. " Born Carolyn Stein in Jersey City, N.J., and raised in Teaneck, N.J., she was a Teaneck High School graduate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Harriett Ann Colder, a reading specialist who established a remedial education company that helped students with English, math and reading, died Tuesdayof multiple organ failure at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 74. The former Harriett Ann Orth, who went by Ann, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1955, she earned her bachelor's degree from what is now Towson University in 1959. In the early 1960s, she earned a master's degree in remedial reading and diagnosis of learning disabilities from Loyola College of Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 31, 2011
Beatrice I. "Bea" Jefferson, a retired educator who taught in city public schools for more than two decades, died Jan. 24 of cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital. She was 89. The daughter of a butcher and a homemaker, Beatrice Irene Knotts was one of eight children. She was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. After graduating in 1939 from Howard High School in Wilmington, Mrs. Jefferson earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 from what is now Morgan State University. Mrs. Jefferson worked for the Social Security Administration while earning her teacher's certification from what is now Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
Cheryl L. Neugebauer, an award-winning reading specialist who embraced the challenge of helping students improve their reading skills, died Oct. 9 of a blood clot at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 34. Cheryl Leigh "Junie" Moher was born and raised in Scranton, Pa., and graduated from Abington Heights High School in 1992. She earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from the University of Scranton in 1996, and a master's degree in reading from the Johns Hopkins University in 2002.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 14, 2008
Deborah F. Griesinger, a reading specialist who was active in the Harford Jewish Center, died March 5 of breast cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Bel Air resident was 48. Deborah Ford was born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring, where she graduated from Springbook High School in 1977. After graduating from the University of Delaware in 1981 with a bachelor's degree in criminal justice, she worked for nonprofits including the Boy Scouts of America, the Leukemia Society of America, the American Heart Association and the Alzheimer's Association.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | February 13, 2008
Susan Schapiro Educational consultant Susan Schapiro Educational Evaluations and Get Set to Read Consultations, Towson Projected annual salary --$75,000 Age --50 Time on the job --Five months How she got started --"I've always enjoyed working with children," said Schapiro, who holds a master's degree in education with a concentration in reading from the Johns Hopkins University. She began her career as a private school teacher. She moved on to teach in the Baltimore County public school system, where she became involved with the program for students in the Gifted and Talented Program.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Entries being taken for national contest on letter-writing Applications are being accepted for the 2001 Letters About Literature Contest, in which pupils in grades four to 12 can win up to $500 for letters to an author, living or dead, about how a book changed their view of the world and themselves. The contest is sponsored by the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Weekly Reader Corp., and locally by the Maryland Center for the Book at Howard County Library. Winners at the national level will receive $500, and first-place winners in Maryland will receive $100.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1997
A statewide panel studying reading instruction in Maryland's public schools kicked into high gear yesterday, drafting a list of -- recommendations for boosting teacher preparation at the state's colleges.The recommendations, to be presented to the state school board next month, were requested by state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.A week ago, Grasmick said she wanted to quadruple the number of courses in reading instruction that early-elementary school education majors are required to take to become state-certified.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
It's often hard to keep politics out of decision-making on education. But when it came to selecting reading curriculums as part of a No Child Left Behind literacy program, some Department of Education officials didn't even try. A report released last week by the Department's inspector general shows that the reading improvement program has been shamefully mired in favoritism and conflicts of interest. Department officials need to clean up the mess as quickly as possible. The Reading First program aims to help first-, second- and third-graders read better as a way to boost broader academic success.
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