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NEWS
September 20, 1998
Howard, Carroll and Frederick counties, working as a consortium, will receive $228,000 in federal funds to train 135 teachers in a pilot project centered primarily on reading instruction for high school students.The program will allow teachers to work with their own students and schools to identify problems older students experience in reading in all subjects. Teachers will then try to find solutions and use them in class.The funding is part of $567,000 in federal Goals 2000 money that the Maryland State Department of Education awarded recently.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
In your editorial, "Ready to learn more" (Aug. 18), you correctly pointed out the vicious cycle of deficits at each grade level which makes it impossible for students to achieve success. One huge deficit begins at the elementary level with reading instruction. There is nothing more important for future success than reading, and if our students are not fluent readers by grade three, they will always be behind. Baltimore City schools chief Gregory Thornton should include professional development in reading for all elementary school teachers in his team focus.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
The Anne Arundel school district vowed yesterday to give sixth-graders two reading classes every day this year - no matter what happens with a challenge to that program that is before the State Board of Education. In a 22-page legal argument filed with the state board, the county defended its "bold program" to double reading instruction for middle school pupils while reducing time spent on electives such as physical education and fine arts. The plan has riled many parents, who say they support extra reading time but don't want it at the expense of electives.
FEATURES
By Julianne Peeling | March 28, 2013
Veteran Baltimore County teacher Helen Zeitzoff may have retired from her day job, but these days she keeps busy writing books that help elementary-school teachers enhance their students' reading skills. Upon her retirement, Zeitzoff, who taught third grade for 32 years, introduced a school-based tutorial program for first-graders to reinforce their developing early literacy skills. In addition, Zeitzoff started her own private tutoring practice where she has worked with children from first to sixth grade.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
Sounds and symbols are crucial, but without meaning aren't enough to motivate children to learn to read, a nationally recognized reading expert said yesterday."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
Carroll County students are settling into the slow pace of summer vacation, but some teachers and administrators returned to the classroom this week to learn about techniques for improving reading instruction in early grades.More than 160 kindergarten and first-grade teachers and administrators participated in the weeklong workshop at Friendship Valley Elementary School."What we hope to accomplish is to really encourage all teachers of young children to think about and reflect upon what they are doing as a classroom teacher to create an environment in which children can learn," said Dorothy Mangle, director of elementary schools.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
The spending plan for next school year proposed this week by Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey includes a renewed emphasis on early reading instruction and, particularly, phonics, a reflection of the national movement back to more traditional teaching methods."
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2000
Sixth-grader Jonathan Chavis works diligently at a computer on a Monday morning, excited about school work for the first time he can remember. Antoine Newman, Chavis' 14-year-old classmate, rushes to a reading station to grab the latest Sports Illustrated after his teacher is pleased by the progress he made during class. At Inverness Center - one of five alternative middle and high schools in Baltimore County - reading teacher Allison Traxler knows firsthand the effect intensive reading instruction can have on pupils with behavior and/or learning problems.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
The state school board has approved a new exam and qualifying score for elementary teachers to qualify for an exemption from Maryland's tougher reading course requirements. But passing the test will be far from easy, even for experienced teachers. The qualifying score set by the school board last week means that only 29 percent of the first 250 teachers to take the exam earned passing marks. The decision by the state board allows elementary school teachers who are renewing their teaching certification to take an exam developed by the Educational Testing Service, rather than enroll in additional courses in reading instruction.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
Carroll County students are settling into the slow pace of summer vacation, but some teachers and administrators returned to the classroom this week to learn about techniques for improving reading instruction in early grades.More than 160 kindergarten and first-grade teachers and administrators participated in the weeklong workshop at Friendship Valley Elementary School."What we hope to accomplish is to really encourage all teachers of young children to think about and reflect upon what they are doing as a classroom teacher to create an environment in which children can learn," said Dorothy Mangle, director of elementary schools.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 21, 2009
Fifth-grade teacher Jennifer Stairs singled out humiliated on a card of vocabulary words. "Have you ever felt humiliated?" she asked the boy sitting next to her. "Yes," said Harry Schuman, a student at Baltimore County's Chase Elementary. "My friend told somebody something that I didn't even do." "It's a good thing or a bad thing?" Stairs pressed. "Bad," Harry said. Stairs nodded, taking notes as he spoke. Humiliated is one of the words the fifth-grader should recognize and understand at his reading level.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | January 28, 2007
An ambitious plan to improve reading among Carroll County students would introduce more frequent assessments of their skills, foster consistent practices and smoother transitions from one level to another and require about 30 additional positions for specialists and other support staff. A draft of the two-year improvement plan, which school officials estimate will cost nearly $1.5 million, has been submitted to the board of education. That draft, which marks another step in a process that began in 2005 with an external audit of the district's reading program, was discussed at Wednesday's board meeting.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
In the 1990s, Hooked on Phonics rode a backlash against so-called whole language reading instruction in schools to become an infomercial phenomenon. But education experts and, at times, federal regulators have been skeptical of the company's claims that it could rapidly improve the skills of struggling young readers. Education experts caution that it works only as an after-school adjunct to comprehensive reading instruction that teaches children more than sounding out letters and words.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Baltimore County schools are adopting a new screening system to determine which of its seventh- and eighth-grade pupils need additional reading instruction. Under the new system, outlined at a school board meeting last night, all 26 middle schools in the county will use the same standards to assess pupils' reading levels. School officials are evaluating the reading skills of the current sixth-graders, who will be the first class affected. All Baltimore County pupils receive reading instruction through sixth grade.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Maryland school officials yesterday received the first installment of a $66 million federal grant aimed at improving reading instruction with an infusion of phonics. Eugene Hickok, U.S. undersecretary of education, delivered a $20 million check, much of which will go to training teachers in "scientifically proven" strategies. The six-year program, known as Reading First, "will change the way reading is taught in Maryland," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick. It was Maryland's second effort to win the grant.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
Carroll County schools scored solidly above average on every category of the new Maryland School Assessment tests, falling short of state-mandated goals only in reading performance by special-education students. The Carroll system was one of only four in the state to surpass 19 of the 20 markers used to monitor school progress. More than 70 percent of Carroll students are proficient or better readers at each grade level tested. Math scores were generally lower, but the worst scoring group, the county's eighth-graders at 52.3 percent proficiency, still beat the state average handily.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
It looks like half of Pat Appell's first-graders are absent today. The same seems to be true next door in Michelle Magee's classroom. In fact, pupils appear to be missing in all the first- and second-grade classrooms at Georgetown East Elementary School. Why else would everything seem so empty? But this is how it's supposed to look every day in a school fiercely devoted to cutting class sizes: Classes of only 14 or so young children seemingly dwarfed in spaces built for 25 or more. "It's so different than every other school," Magee says.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
The Howard County school board indicated last night it is likely to support increased spending for textbooks and elementary reading instruction for next year.As board members pored over the details of Superintendent Michael E. Hickey's proposed 1997-98 operating budget, they expressed approval for plans that include replacing textbooks more frequently and improving reading instruction in the early grades.Last night's work session focused on the instructional portion of Hickey's $251.9 million proposed operating budget.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 20, 2003
Mirroring national results, the reading achievement of Maryland fourth-graders has improved significantly since 1998, leading state officials to believe that a heavy emphasis on early reading instruction is paying off. The bad news from the 2002 reading results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress is that eighth-grade scores haven't budged for more than a decade. "I said three years ago that I would be shocked if early-grade reading scores did not improve everywhere by 2002 and 2003," said Mark D. Musick, former president of the National Assessment Governing Board, which released the scores in Washington yesterday.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
When Kay Hayes plans reading lessons for her third-graders at Mount Airy Elementary School, the 29-year teaching veteran frequently ends up on something of a scavenger hunt while rummaging for instructional materials. "Now you have to go searching," she said. "You go to the reading books in the school storage room. Each grade level also has a storage site. And then we each have our own supply of materials we've collected over the years. We kind of beg and borrow from each other." But a new collection of books introduced at the school this week - nearly $94,000 worth of teacher guidebooks, lesson planners, pupils' textbooks, intervention handbooks and books targeted for children reading on, below and above grade level - is changing that, teachers and administrators said.
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