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By Luke Broadwater | May 12, 2011
A couple days ago, I pointed out on this blog that rapper Common isn't the monster some Republicans are making him out to be. In fact, he has lyrics that many conservatives could agree with, such as those that make the case for a pro-life world view .  Jon Stewart waded in to the contrived controversy last night on "The Daily Show," pointing out the lack of reading comprehension and hypocrisy on the part of those criticizing the Obama administration's...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 12, 2011
A couple days ago, I pointed out on this blog that rapper Common isn't the monster some Republicans are making him out to be. In fact, he has lyrics that many conservatives could agree with, such as those that make the case for a pro-life world view .  Jon Stewart waded in to the contrived controversy last night on "The Daily Show," pointing out the lack of reading comprehension and hypocrisy on the part of those criticizing the Obama administration's...
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NEWS
November 18, 2001
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: Chadwick Elementary School, 1918 Winder Road, Woodlawn, seeks volunteer tutors to listen to students read, work on reading comprehension and vocabulary and read and interpret math books for 8- and 9-year-old pupils. Information: Robin Rosebrough, 410- 887-1300. If your school or organization would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410- 783-1800 and enter code 6130.
FEATURES
November 8, 2007
You stop at the mailbox and bump into the guy down the hall. Or you pull into the driveway just as your neighbor is getting home. Suddenly you're gabbing about nothing in particular, and you end up frittering away 10 minutes. It's not a waste of time, according to research to be published in the February 2008 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Ten minutes of talking, face to face or by phone, improves memory and boosts intellectual performance as much as doing crossword puzzles.
NEWS
May 1, 1996
JUDGING FROM the suggestion that middle schools in Anne Arundel County reduce music and arts programs in order to improve results on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program, it would appear these tests have become the tail wagging the dog.A task force of parents and educators, concerned about below-average reading performance by eighth-grade students on the MSPAP exam, would like to cut art and music electives and require a new reading course.By...
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 7, 1990
WESTMINSTER - High school students already have deluged Emma Weishaar with questions about how much more difficult the Scholastic Aptitude Test -- the most widely used college entrance exam -- will be when some multiple-choice questions are eliminated in 1994.Weishaar can give them an educated guess."I think it will be more difficult," said the head of the math department at North Carroll High School. "Multiple choice lends to multiple guess."But like other Carroll educators, Weishaar has not seen details of the College Board trustees' revisions, which include allowing students to use calculators on some math problems and increasing the emphasis on reading comprehension.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1995
On national standardized tests this spring, Baltimore elementary students' average scores did not go up, ending a slight three-year rise that city officials had hailed as proof of academic improvement.After analyzing the results of the 1995 Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills for weeks, Baltimore school administrators interpreted the latest scores as a "leveling off" and said students in grades one through five are "keeping pace" with last year's performance.Reading comprehension scores were flat, while math scores dropped slightly from last year's levels, school administrators said.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
They've looked at outer space through a telescope, cruised the Inner Harbor by sailboat, and even flown -- on ropes, anyway -- in Baltimore's Leakin Park.Most important, the 70 children enrolled at SuperKids Camp's Federal Hill Elementary School site have completed their real work: daily 90-minute reading sessions for the past seven weeks.Well-deserving of the title "SuperKids," now they're ready to dedicate their last week of the grant-funded program to overnight camping trips, parties and graduation.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
Baltimore's school system overstated gains last spring when it released preliminary test scores for the eight elementary schools run by for-profit Education Alternatives Inc., newly revised results released yesterday show.Yesterday's new data also show that reading and math scores have declined at EAI-run schools over the past two years while rising districtwide.At a June news conference, city school leaders had touted overall average increases between last spring and the previous year in reading comprehension scores on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills for the eight "Tesseract" elementary schools run by EAI. In reality, the average scores in reading comprehension for the combined eight schools declined, new results show.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 30, 1999
Once a week this school year, Tolu Olokum has been working with second-grader Shiloh Jordan, listening carefully as the young boy sounds out words phonetically.Using rapid hand motions, she coaches Shiloh and offers words of encouragement when he struggles."It's fun. I help my 5-year-old brother sometimes," said Tolu, a tall fifth-grader who takes credit for helping her brother, Quan, learn to read.Tolu is among 15 fifth-graders at Pikesville's Winand Elementary School who have been gathering in the school library during homeroom period every Wednesday morning to help second-graders with their reading.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2004
Rebecca Fritz likes the rewards from the Eagle Challenge reading program at Longfellow Elementary School in Columbia, but what really motivates her is learning about the stories. "I like how the program encourages people to read because some children may not have been read to," the 8-year-old said. "It's really all about the reading." Her favorite books involve nature and princesses, and she enjoys books by authors Gail Carlson Levine and Andrew Clements. Rebecca's mother, Peggy, is a coach in the program, which began about eight years ago after a group of parents got together to promote a love of reading among schoolchildren.
NEWS
November 18, 2001
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: Chadwick Elementary School, 1918 Winder Road, Woodlawn, seeks volunteer tutors to listen to students read, work on reading comprehension and vocabulary and read and interpret math books for 8- and 9-year-old pupils. Information: Robin Rosebrough, 410- 887-1300. If your school or organization would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410- 783-1800 and enter code 6130.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
NEW YORK - Forget reading by 9. How about reading by 18? That's what Harvard University Professor Catherine E. Snow is saying these days. Three years ago, Snow was chairwoman of a National Research Council panel whose report, "Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children," pretty much put to rest the raging battle between phonics and whole language. The two approaches - one mapping letters to sounds, the other exposing children to good literature - aren't mutually exclusive, the report said.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
Baltimore County elementary school pupils will get two new reading series in the next academic year -- one that will concentrate on phonics, or the sounds letters form to create words, and another to teach reading comprehension. Administrators will spend $2.7 million to purchase a "balanced and comprehensive" collection of readers by publishers Open Court and Houghton Mifflin Co. for use in all elementary schools. In the past, principals picked their reading series, or teachers patched together reading materials from home and school libraries.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
They've looked at outer space through a telescope, cruised the Inner Harbor by sailboat, and even flown -- on ropes, anyway -- in Baltimore's Leakin Park.Most important, the 70 children enrolled at SuperKids Camp's Federal Hill Elementary School site have completed their real work: daily 90-minute reading sessions for the past seven weeks.Well-deserving of the title "SuperKids," now they're ready to dedicate their last week of the grant-funded program to overnight camping trips, parties and graduation.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 30, 1999
Once a week this school year, Tolu Olokum has been working with second-grader Shiloh Jordan, listening carefully as the young boy sounds out words phonetically.Using rapid hand motions, she coaches Shiloh and offers words of encouragement when he struggles."It's fun. I help my 5-year-old brother sometimes," said Tolu, a tall fifth-grader who takes credit for helping her brother, Quan, learn to read.Tolu is among 15 fifth-graders at Pikesville's Winand Elementary School who have been gathering in the school library during homeroom period every Wednesday morning to help second-graders with their reading.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
Learning to read is the first step; reading to learn is the ultimate goal. That's the premise of a state pilot project aimed at training more than 130 secondary school teachers from Carroll, Howard and Frederick counties in effective strategies to help students improve reading comprehension abilities.Although most pupils learn the mechanics of reading in the early grades, many don't acquire the skills to understand and retain what they read."They learn to decode. They learn to turn written symbols into recognizeable words," said Chris Paulis, an instructional facilitator for reading with Howard's schools and project director of the reading-for-content effort.
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